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Enterprise UX patterns: Good, bad and ugly

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Documented, enterprise design standards supporting homogenous customer experiences across different systems and touch points are often considered a holy grail of UX design. In many ways they are. bBut they can also lead to unintended consequences for both the design team and subsequent designs. We draw on experiences from a large federal agency to describe the impact, some positive and some less so, that mature but evolving design standards can have on designers, design and the development processes.

Published in: Design
  • This really hits the mark. My team at Ogee Studio is primarily designing enterprise software for Networking & Security products; and over the last 2 years we have experienced so much of what you have documented. Would like to have a offline discussion and dig in detail on the documentation you have.
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Enterprise UX patterns: Good, bad and ugly

  1. 1. 1 Interaction Research in Practice.16 Studies UX Pros should know Kath Straub Usability.org 1 Enterprise UX patterns: Good, bad and ugly Kath Straub, PhD
  2. 2. 2 Abstract Documented, enterprise design standards supporting homogenous customer experiences across different systems and touch points are often considered a holy grail of UX design. In many ways they are. But they can also lead to unintended consequences for both the design team and subsequent designs. We draw on experiences from a large federal agency to describe the impact, some positive and some less so, that mature but evolving design standards can have on designers, design and the development processes. Attendees will be exposed–for the first time–to the agency’s extensive and extensively tested design patterns, and will benefit from a frank discussion of the new challenges that evolving enterprise standards introduce.
  3. 3. 3 Design patterns The Easter bunny & the O’s in first place Promises, promises …
  4. 4. Benefit Consistency across systems and devices. 4
  5. 5. Benefit Patterns reduce everyone’s effort. 5
  6. 6. Benefit Supports the paramedic model of UX 6
  7. 7. Benefit Integrate testing across projects. 7
  8. 8. The User Experience Framework 8 Agency Web Patterns
  9. 9. If you could change 1 thing about the way you’ve developed or managed your web standards, what would you change? 9
  10. 10. Key insight Developers are users, too. 10
  11. 11. 11 We are here. Challenge Patterns are necessarily deployed incomplete.
  12. 12. Challenge Role of developers morphs 12
  13. 13. 13 Challenge Pattern developers have to make choices.
  14. 14. 14 Challenge Pattern developers do not want to be CSRs.
  15. 15. 15 Challenge Pattern developers have to make choices.
  16. 16. Challenge Patterns are documented as atoms not molecules. 16
  17. 17. 17 Challenge Pattern documentation testing needs to be multi-layer. • Find • Apply • Modify
  18. 18. Challenge Overtime patterns and code become one. 18 Patterns Code Axure Prototyping Tools
  19. 19. Challenge Designers with “advanced” tools stop sketching (!) 19
  20. 20. Benefit? Challenge? A little of both? The role of designer changes, too. 20
  21. 21. Challenge Designers start think in patterns first, not needs 21
  22. 22. Challenge Designers now come in two flavors 22 Compliance
  23. 23. Challenge Retrofitting legacy systems to patterns 23
  24. 24. 24 We are here. What’s next? Web Components
  25. 25. Methods 25 Questions? What do you think?
  26. 26. kath@usability.org https://www.linkedin.com/in/kathstraub/ @kathstraub 26 About the speaker Kath Straub, PhD Principal Contact
  27. 27. 27 Usability.org helps organizations around the world improve customer engagement and evolve their customer research/ design capabilities. We provide • Customer research • Interaction and communication design • Evaluation • Training/mentoring • Organizational change strategy • Staff augmentation Have a question? Please ask! info@usability.org

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