Chapter 3

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  • Review chapter objectives.
  • Explain description Share examples of descriptive paragraphs.
  • Reviewhints for writing a descriptive paragraph. Explain specific words and sense words.Activity—Think, Pair, Share: Direct students to think about their favorite celebrity or public figure. Ask students to brainstorm and only include specific or sense words in their descriptions of this individual. Inform each student that they are not to disclose the individual they are describing in the brainstorm. Direct students to pair up and share their brainstorms with their partners. Ask partners to try and guess which celebrity or public figure their partner has described in their brainstorm. Have partner groups discuss how the use of specific and sense words influenced their guess.
  • Review the stages of the writing process for a descriptive paragraph.
  • Review prewriting activities for a descriptive paragraph. Explain dominant impression and share examples. Allow students the opportunity to review brainstorms about favorite celebrity or public figure. Have students create a dominent impression for a descriptive paragraph about their favorite celebrity or public figure.
  • Explainthe relationship between the dominant impression and the topic sentence. Have students practice adding details to the dominant impressions created about their favorite celebrity or public figure. Create an outline for a descriptive paragraph. Show examples of descriptive paragraphs that have time sequence, spatial position, and similar types order.
  • Have students create a rough draft from the information presented in the outline. In partner groups, have students peer review drafts of the descriptive paragraphs. Have students use the revision checklist as a guide in the peer review sessions. Review transitions for a descriptive paragraph.
  • Allowstudents to exchange drafts with another student. In the new partner groups, have students proofread each other’s paper.
  • Chapter 3

    1. 1. Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    2. 2. CHAPTER 3: DESCRIPTIONCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    3. 3. CHAPTER OUTLINE AND LEARNING OBJECTIVESIn this chapter, you will learn to write a descriptiveparagraph that: supports a dominant impression, and contains effective sense details.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    4. 4. WHAT IS DESCRIPTION? Description shows a reader what a person, place, thing, or situation is like.  When you write a description, you try to show, not tell about, something.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    5. 5. HINTS FOR WRITING A DESCRIPTIVE PARAGRAPH Using Specific Words and Phrases  Using specific words and phrases will help the reader “see” what you are describing.  Note difference between specific and general words. Using Sense Words in Your Descriptions  One way to make your description specific and vivid is to use sense words.  INFO BOX: Devising Sense DetailsCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    6. 6. WRITING THE DESCRIPTIVE PARAGRAPH IN STEPS PrewritingDescription—how to generate and develop ideas for your description paragraph Planning Description—how to organize your ideas for your description paragraph Drafting and Revising Description—how to create, revise, and edit rough drafts of your description paragraph Proofreading Description—how to proofread and make one final check of your description paragraphCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    7. 7. PREWRITING DESCRIPTION Writing a descriptive paragraph begins with thinking on paper, looking for specific details and sense descriptions.  Think by brainstorming, freewriting, or writing in a journal. The Dominant Impression  This idea is the main point or topic sentence of the descriptive paragraph.  Once you have a dominant impression, you are ready to add more details.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    8. 8. PLANNING DESCRIPTION The sentence created for the dominant impression can be the topic sentence for your outline. Beneath the topic sentence, list the details you have collected. Descriptions can be listed in the following orders:  time sequence  spatial position  similar types Outline for a Descriptive ParagraphCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    9. 9. DRAFTING AND REVISING DESCRIPTION After you have an outline, the next step is to create a rough draft. Checklist for Revising a Descriptive Paragraph Transitions  Words or phrases that link one idea to another.  INFO BOX: Transitions for a Descriptive ParagraphCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    10. 10. PROOFREADING DESCRIPTION Look for errors in spelling, punctuation, typing, and copying. Lines of Detail: A Walk-Through Assignment Topics for Writing a Descriptive Paragraph Topics for Critical Thinking and WritingCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    11. 11. WHAT IS DESCRIPTION?A. Divides something into different categories according to some basis.B. Shows a reader what a person, place, thing, or situation is like.C. Explains how to do something or describes how something happened or is done.D. Discusses similarities.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    12. 12. WHAT IS DESCRIPTION?A. Divides something into different categories according to some basis.B. Shows a reader what a person, place, thing, or situation is like.C. Explains how to do something or describes how something happened or is done.D. Discusses similarities.contains effective sense details.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    13. 13. DETAILS MAKE THE DESCRIPTION MORE VIVID.A. FiveB. MajorC. MinorD. SenseCopyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    14. 14. DETAILS MAKE THE DESCRIPTION MORE VIVID.A. FiveB. MajorC. MinorD. Sensecontains effective sense details.Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    15. 15. THE MAIN POINT OF A DESCRIPTION IS CALLED A. main idea B. gist C. dominant impression D. controlling idea Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.
    16. 16. THE MAIN POINT OF A DESCRIPTION IS CALLED A. main idea B. gist C. dominant impression D. controlling idea supports a dominant impression. Copyright © 2012 by Pearson Education, Inc.

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