NATIONAL DIGITAL
INFORMATION
INFRASTRUCTURE AND
PRESERVATION PROGRAM
A N O V E R V I E W O F T H I S D I G I TA L P R E S ...
AGENDA
[insert section divider here]
About Library and Congress
Program Background
Scope of NDIIPP
Timeline
NDIIPP In...
WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY
NATIONAL
DIGITAL
STEWARDSHIP
ALLIANCE
(164)
DIGITAL
PRESERVATION
OUTREACH
AND
EDUCATION (50)
N...
The National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation
Program (NDIIPP) is a collaborative digital preservation ...
SCOPE
The mission of the National Digital Information
Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) is to
develop a nat...
TIMELINE
2000:
2003:
2003:
2004:
2005:
2007:
2008:
2011:
WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY
Congress
created
legislation
that ena...
NDIIPP
INITIATIVES
Digital Preservation Partnerships (9)
Digital Archiving and Long-Term Preservation
(11)
Technical Archi...
LEAD
INSTITUTION
PARTNER
INSTITUTION(S
)
PROJECT A
AFFINITY
GROUPS
LC
SENIOR
STAFF
MEMBE
R
FACILIATED
BY
LC STAFF
WHO WHAT...
Educational Broadcasting
Corporation (Thirteen/WNET
New York)
WGBH Educational Foundation
LC
SENIOR
STAFF
MEMBE
R
WHO WHAT...
WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY
The NDIIPP is a national program that supports the stewardship of
digital content. They are in...
THANK YOU.
ANY QUESTIONS?
REFERENCES (1/2)
Ashenfelder, M. (2014). Digital Preservation Pioneer: Bill LeFurgy. Retrieved March 3,
2014, from http://...
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ISI 6522 ndiipp final

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  • Hi everyone, Today Kelly and I will be presenting an overview of the Library of Congress digital preservation program called “National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program”.
  • Here is our agenda for this presentation. We structured the presentation around the 5 W’s: Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How. Our approach is to look broadly at the digital preservation strategy at Library and Congress then will narrow to talk about how the program developed, its initiatives etc. Lastly, we will finish with our reflections as to why the program is important.
  • The NDIIPP is part of the Library of Congress’ digital preservation strategyAlthough this presentation is focussing on the National Digital Information Infrastructure And Preservation Program, we wanted to outline the Library of Congress’ other digital preservation partners. The Library of Congress has partnered with five groups for digital preservation.Three of those groups are based at the Library of Congress:Digital Preservation Outreach And Education National Digital Stewardship AllianceNational Digital Information Infrastructure And Preservation ProgramThe other two groups – The Federal Digitization Guidelines Initiative & The International Internet Preservation Consortium – are not based at the Library of Congress.The numbers in brackets below the groups name indicates the number of organizations that that group has partnered with. These numbers speak to the volume of groups and organizations working on digital preservation – a total of 320.As you can see, the NDIIPP has the largest number of partners with 261. (Library of Congress,n.d.-4)
  • Now we will look more closely at the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program. NDIIPP is a national program led by the Library of Congress that supports the stewardship of digital content. As we can see on the slide, its mission is aimed at implementing a national strategy to collect, preserve and make available significant digital content…”The program a is a cooperative effort of numerous partners to ensure successful and sustainable digital resources. The Program focuses on three areas:Capturing, preserving and making available digital content, such as geospatial information, web sites, audio visual productions, images and text, and materials related public policy issues.Building and strengthening digital preservation partnerships and networks. The program has more than 130 partners drawn from federal agencies, state and local governments, academia, professional and nonprofit organizations, and commercial entities.Developing technical tools and services. NDIIPP partners work collaboratively to develop a technical infrastructure by building the information systems, tools, and services that support digital preservation.Through this program, the NDIIPP and its partners have laid the foundation for a collaborative approach to digital preservation.http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/about/background.html
  • The following statement outlines the scope (or the WHERE) of NDIIPP:“The mission of the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) is to develop a national strategy to collect, preserve and make available significant digital content, especially information that is created in digital form only, for current and future use. Preservation partners from around the world are selecting and preserving at risk digital content organized into over 1400 collections.” (Library of Congress, n.d.-1)Within the US, NDIIPP is currently “working with 35 states to advance records preservation and access” (Ashenfelder, 2014).
  • Now, I will outline the background of NDIIPP:In the year 2000, Public Law 106-554 passed Congress; this legislation enacted the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP). This legislation “provided up to to $100 million of funding, was authorized to support NDIIPP, with $75 million contingent on a dollar for dollar match from nonfederal sources” (LeFurgy, 2005, p. 164) In 2003, after spending years in meetings with stakeholders across the country “and studying critical aspects of the challenge, the Library issued a comprehensive plan for tackling the digital preservation problem. The plan, called Preserving Our Digital Heritage, outlined an approach to build a national network of entities committed to digital preservation and that are linked through a shared technical framework.” (LeFurgy, 2005, p. 164) Later in 2003, a program announcement was launched to start accepting program proposals. “Proposals could seek awards of between $500,000 and $3 million for up to three years; applicants were also required to provide matching resource contributions. The call specified that proposals provide for three outcomes:Partnership models for allocating collecting roles and responsibilities across collaborating institutions.Collections of at-risk digital content.Strategies and best practices for identifying, capturing, and retaining content.” (LeFurgy, 2005, p. 165) A year later, 2004, NDIIPP began funding proposals; these included partnerships with universities, research institutes, archives, law firms, OCLC, and others, and were focused on a variety of topics within cultural, social, historical, business and technological domains (LeFurgy, 2005, p. 167-170). In 2005, “the Library hosted an opening kickoff meeting for all the partners.” (LeFurgy, 2005, p. 166). The library has continued to sponsor regular meetings since (Library of Congress, n.d.-6). These meetings speak to the importance of partnerships and collaboration for NDIIPP. “In 2007, the Library funded the Preserving Creative America initiative to target preservation issues across a broad range of creative works, including digital photographs, cartoons, motion pictures, sound recordings and video games” (Library of Congress, n.d.-6). “The Preserving State Government Information Initiative got underway in 2008 with support for four projects involving 23 states” (Library of Congress, n.d.-6). As I mentioned earlier, this number has since grown to collaborations with 35 states. And “in 2011, the Library published a report, Preserving Our Digital Heritage: The National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program 2010 Report, that documents the achievements of the Library of Congress and its NDIIPP partners” (Library of Congress, n.d.-6).    
  • NDIIPP initiatives are divided into 9 categories (Library of Congress, n.d.-3).Within these categories, NDIIPP has 261 partners (Library of Congress, n.d.-4)Partners within the “strategic partnerships” initiative include some organizations that other presenters in class have discussed and we’ve read about in our readings, like:Internet ArchiveLOCKSS/CLOCKSSPorticoSCOLA(Library of Congress, n.d.-3)
  • This diagram demonstrates how NDIIPP projects and partnerships work. For each project, there is a lead institution and at least one partner institution.An LC staff member is the point on contact on the project and acts as the “go-between” for the project and NDIIPP. In addition to project groups (dedicated to working on a single project), there are also affinity groups. Any and all partners can participate in affinity groups; affinity groups address “significant topics that cut across all the interests of the partners” (LeFurgy, 2005, p. 166).These include: “intellectual property rights, content collection and selection, technical infrastructure, and the economics of sustaining digital preservation over the long term” (LeFurgy, 2005, p. 166).
  • Next, to better demonstrate the NDIIPP working structure, I will apply it to one of the NDIIPP’s initial projectsThis project was outlined in an article published by William Lefurgy in 2005 (LeFurgy, 2005, p. 167-168).I’m quoting directly from LeFurgy’s article (2005, p. 168):Thirteen and WGBH are the two largest producers of public television content in the United States. Through PBS, their productions are made available to audiences from coast to coast.Together, these three entities produce and distribute the majority of public television in the United States. NYU is home to one of America’s most distinguished research libraries, and the university recently established a graduate-level program in moving image preservation, which includes the exploration of digital technologies. The four partners will focus on such influential series as “Nature,” “American Masters,” “NOVA,” and “Frontline,” which are increasingly being produced only in digital formats, including the new high-definition standard (HDTV). Issues associated with the preservation of important corollary content, such as Web sites that accompany broadcasts, will also be examined
  • NDIIPP provides a national program to address important policy, standards and technical components necessary for digital preservation. I have provided a few bullets as why we find NDIIPP an influential leader in digital preservation. **Add more- To conclude, Library of Congress is clearly seen as having a role to play as a digital stewardship advocate and leader and the National Digital Information Infrastructure & Preservation Program is one step in that right direction.
  • ISI 6522 ndiipp final

    1. 1. NATIONAL DIGITAL INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND PRESERVATION PROGRAM A N O V E R V I E W O F T H I S D I G I TA L P R E S E R VAT I O N I N I T I AT I V E C H R I S T I N E N E W M A N A N D K E L L Y S I R E T T I S I 6 5 2 2 G E S T I O N D E S D O C U M E N T S E L E C T R O N I Q U E M A R C H 1 0 T H , 2 0 1 4
    2. 2. AGENDA [insert section divider here] About Library and Congress Program Background Scope of NDIIPP Timeline NDIIPP Initiatives Program Structure Importance LC image taken from NDIIPP 2010 Report
    3. 3. WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY NATIONAL DIGITAL STEWARDSHIP ALLIANCE (164) DIGITAL PRESERVATION OUTREACH AND EDUCATION (50) NATIONAL DIGITAL INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTUR E AND PRESERVATION PROGRAM (261) FEDERAL DIGITIZATION GUIDELINES INITIATIVE (17) INTERNATIONAL INTERNET PRESERVATION CONSORTIUM (37)
    4. 4. The National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) is a collaborative digital preservation program that supports the successful and sustainable stewardship of digital content. The program’s mission statement is aimed at implementing a national strategy to collect, preserve, and make available significant digital content especially information that is created in digital form only, for current and future generations. Library of Congress. (n.d.-6). Program Background. . WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY NATIONAL DIGITAL INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND PRESERVATION PROGRAM “ ”
    5. 5. SCOPE The mission of the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) is to develop a national strategy to collect, preserve and make available significant digital content, especially information that is created in digital form only, for current and future use. Preservation partners from around the world are selecting and preserving at risk digital content organized into over 1400 collections. (Library of Congress, n.d.-1) “ ” WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY
    6. 6. TIMELINE 2000: 2003: 2003: 2004: 2005: 2007: 2008: 2011: WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY Congress created legislation that enacted NDIIPP Started acceptin g program proposal s Kickoff meeting for all partners Began Preserving State Government Information Initiative “Preserving Our Digital Heritage” was issued by Library of Congress Funded first proposals Launched Preserving Creative America Initiative Published “Preserving Our Digital Heritage: 2010 Report“
    7. 7. NDIIPP INITIATIVES Digital Preservation Partnerships (9) Digital Archiving and Long-Term Preservation (11) Technical Architecture (7) Digital Preservation Policy (2) Preserving Creative America (9) Preserving State Government Information (5) Strategic Partnerships (4) Organizational Alliances (5) Standards Alliances (3) WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY
    8. 8. LEAD INSTITUTION PARTNER INSTITUTION(S ) PROJECT A AFFINITY GROUPS LC SENIOR STAFF MEMBE R FACILIATED BY LC STAFF WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY
    9. 9. Educational Broadcasting Corporation (Thirteen/WNET New York) WGBH Educational Foundation LC SENIOR STAFF MEMBE R WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY PROJECT: Establish procedures, structures, and national standards necessary to preserve public television programs produced in digital formats. Public Broadcasting Service New York University LEAD INSTITUTIO N PARTNER INSTITUTIONS
    10. 10. WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN HOW WHY The NDIIPP is a national program that supports the stewardship of digital content. They are influential in a number of ways:  The NDIIPP has invested in a variety of initiatives to form a network of preservation partners.  The NDIIPP has developed infrastructure with the help of their international community of partners to support the stewardship of digital content.  The NDIIPP has funded numerous initiatives to target at-risk material in a broad range of creative works, including digital photographs, cartoons, motion pictures, sound recordings and video games.  The NDIIPP contribute to greater access to preserved material through various partner collections. IMPORTANCE
    11. 11. THANK YOU. ANY QUESTIONS?
    12. 12. REFERENCES (1/2) Ashenfelder, M. (2014). Digital Preservation Pioneer: Bill LeFurgy. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2014/02/digital- preservation-pioneer-bill-lefurgy/ LeFurgy, W. (2005). Building Preservation Partnerships: The Library of Congress National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program. Library Trends, 54(1), 163-172. doi: 10.1353/lib.2006.0004 Library of Congress. (n.d.-1). About the Library. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://www.loc.gov/about/ Library of Congress. (n.d.-2). General Information. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://www.loc.gov/about/general-information/ Library of Congress. (n.d.-3). Initiatives. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/about/initiatives.html Library of Congress. (n.d.-4). Partners. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/partners/ Library of Congress. (n.d.-5). Partner Collections. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/collections/collections.html Library of Congress. (n.d.-6). Program Background. Retrieved March 3, 2014, from http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/about/background.html National Digital Information Infrastructure & Preservation Program. (2010). Preserving Our Digital Heritage: The National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program 2010 Report. Washington, D.C: Library of Congress http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/documents/NDIIPP2010Report_Post.pdf

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