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Constructing a Strategic Plan:
Essential Processes & Components
Presented by
Rebecca Jones, MLS
Managing Partner, Dysart &...
Strategic Planning Process
Investigate
• Audit organization’s current situation
• Scan environment & emerging trends
Consu...
In the environment emerging
around us, how will our products
& services positively impact the
studies or work of those in ...
Like any project, it requires:
Planning is
a good
thing
And, planning
is a good
thing, right?
Lots…
If these
elements
are
missing
Courage
Commitment
Decisiveness
Vision
Leadership
Measurement
Courage
Takes courage to question assumptions:
• The SWOT is a powerful analytical tool if used
properly
• Focus on the future – e...
Takes Courage to Research &
Forecast Future Trends
• Future forecasts are based on analysis; there is
limited trends analy...
Takes Courage to Use the SWOT
Properly
• Isolate elements of the SWOT that indicate the need
for change – all else is irre...
Takes courage to change:
Willingness to shift service focus:
– Divest to Invest
Readiness to:
– Accept the Implications
– ...
Takes courage to drive a true
planning process
Commitment
https://goo.gl/RYm48J
Commit the Time and Energy
• Strategic Planning is hard
work
• Advance preparation is
essential
• Senior staff must commit...
Decisiveness
https://goo.gl/1e4PQs
18
Determining your mission, your vision, and
your strategies is fundamentally a decision-
making process to go in this di...
Vision
“Vision statements … are also the
most overused, abused, and
poorly written part of strategic
planning you will ever see.”...
An Effective Vision
• Addresses the SW and the OT in the SWOT
• Communicates a clear picture of a preferred
future
• Focus...
Leadership
“The only way a leader is going to translate
a vision into reality – an ability that is the
essence of leadership – is to ...
Leaders know that passionate discussion, with
difficult perspectives on the future, are essential
for a successful strateg...
Demonstrating Leadership
• Identify necessary changes – regardless of the
discomfort
• Challenge public opinion and percep...
Decisions are Critical Throughout
the Process
1. Is it a Strategic Plan, a Service Plan or an Operational Plan?
2. Will th...
Measurement
Measurement is Part of Strategic
Planning, NOT an Afterthought
“Strategic planning is an organizational management activit...
Strategic Planning Process
Investigate
• Audit organization’s current situation
• Scan environment & emerging trends
Consu...
How Do We Know if
We Are Achieving
Success?
Measure and Evaluate.
The Evaluation Framework
1. Engage
Stakeholde
rs
2. Describe
Program
3. Focus
Evaluation
Design
4. Gather
Credible
Evidenc...
1. Engage Stakeholders
• Who is involved in program
operations?
• Who is served or affected by the
program?
• Who are the ...
2. Describe the Program:
The Logic Model
3. Choose the Evaluation Design
• Formative evaluation
– Is the program designed to meet the identified need?
– How can pr...
4. Establish Criteria, Gather Evidence
Evaluation Question
Definition of Success
Criteria for Success
Indicators / Measure...
Guiding
Principles
to
Selecting
Indicators
• Ensure that the indicators are linked to
the program goals and are able to
me...
5. Justify Conclusions
• Link your conclusions to the evidence
• Consider the conclusions against agreed-upon
values or st...
6. Ensure Use & Share Lessons
• Design the evaluation to achieve intended use by
intended user.
• Make sure all stakeholde...
Q & A
Thank You
Rebecca Jones – Rebecca@dysartjones.com
Kimberly Silk – Kim@brightsail.com
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Constructing a Strategic Plan: Essential Processes and Components

Presented by Rebecca Jones and Kimberly Silk at SLA Annual Conference, June 2018

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Constructing a Strategic Plan: Essential Processes and Components

  1. 1. Constructing a Strategic Plan: Essential Processes & Components Presented by Rebecca Jones, MLS Managing Partner, Dysart & Jones Associates & Kimberly Silk, MLS Principal Consultant, Brightsail Research
  2. 2. Strategic Planning Process Investigate • Audit organization’s current situation • Scan environment & emerging trends Consult • Identify stakeholder & market perceptions & expectations Consider & Decide • Analyze findings to determine strengths, weaknesses, opportunities & threats • Agree on mission, vision, strategies & specific action plans Do & Assess • Implement actions • Evaluate progress Phases Key Questions 1. Where are we now? 2. What is or will impact our market – & us? 3. What will happen if we continue in our current direction? 1. Who are those with a stake in our success – or demise? 2. How are we positioned in their work & minds? 3. What do they need to succeed? 1. SoWOT do these findings mean for us? 2. Where do we need to be in 3-5 years? 3. How will we get there? 4. What will success look like? 1. Who is accountable for doing what, when? 2. How are we managing our assessment? 3. Are we succeeding?
  3. 3. In the environment emerging around us, how will our products & services positively impact the studies or work of those in our “market”?
  4. 4. Like any project, it requires:
  5. 5. Planning is a good thing And, planning is a good thing, right?
  6. 6. Lots… If these elements are missing Courage Commitment Decisiveness Vision Leadership Measurement
  7. 7. Courage
  8. 8. Takes courage to question assumptions: • The SWOT is a powerful analytical tool if used properly • Focus on the future – ensure “O” and “T” are grounded in research on the future of communities, society and the industry you are in • Frame the SWOT as “SoWOT” – seriously consider what this means for your library
  9. 9. Takes Courage to Research & Forecast Future Trends • Future forecasts are based on analysis; there is limited trends analysis • Few information professionals are trained forecasters; little understanding of the field or the techniques • We are generally too preoccupied with today to think seriously about the future
  10. 10. Takes Courage to Use the SWOT Properly • Isolate elements of the SWOT that indicate the need for change – all else is irrelevant and distracts you from the primary purpose of the strategic plan • In most cases – the critical considerations can be counted on one hand – in most strategic plans 80% of the strengths and weaknesses are of no significance
  11. 11. Takes courage to change: Willingness to shift service focus: – Divest to Invest Readiness to: – Accept the Implications – Reallocate Budget and Priorities to Reflect New Directions
  12. 12. Takes courage to drive a true planning process
  13. 13. Commitment https://goo.gl/RYm48J
  14. 14. Commit the Time and Energy • Strategic Planning is hard work • Advance preparation is essential • Senior staff must commit a significant amount of time and staff investment
  15. 15. Decisiveness
  16. 16. https://goo.gl/1e4PQs
  17. 17. 18 Determining your mission, your vision, and your strategies is fundamentally a decision- making process to go in this direction as opposed to that direction.
  18. 18. Vision
  19. 19. “Vision statements … are also the most overused, abused, and poorly written part of strategic planning you will ever see.” Peter Wright http://www.planningbootcamp.com
  20. 20. An Effective Vision • Addresses the SW and the OT in the SWOT • Communicates a clear picture of a preferred future • Focuses on the need for major changes • Drives the strategic directions and ultimately the goals and tactics
  21. 21. Leadership
  22. 22. “The only way a leader is going to translate a vision into reality – an ability that is the essence of leadership – is to anchor, implement and execute that vision through a variety of policies, practices, procedures and systems that will bring in people and empower them to implement the vision”. Warren Bennis
  23. 23. Leaders know that passionate discussion, with difficult perspectives on the future, are essential for a successful strategy.
  24. 24. Demonstrating Leadership • Identify necessary changes – regardless of the discomfort • Challenge public opinion and perceptions – be prepared to take your services in a different direction • Actively engage segments of your market that no longer view your services as a important part of their life or a vital contributor to their interests – “Non users?” nah…..”potential customers” • Make your case for change – reasoned, defensible and practical – and then do it
  25. 25. Decisions are Critical Throughout the Process 1. Is it a Strategic Plan, a Service Plan or an Operational Plan? 2. Will the vision describe an organization that addresses major social, economic, and sector changes? 3. Does the plan consider, and likely change, key outcomes and priorities? 4. Does the plan lead rather than follow popular opinion? 5. Does it reallocate resources? 6. Is there commitment to establish success measures and to monitor and manage the measures?
  26. 26. Measurement
  27. 27. Measurement is Part of Strategic Planning, NOT an Afterthought “Strategic planning is an organizational management activity that is used to set priorities, focus energy and resources, strengthen operations, ensure that employees and other stakeholders are working toward common goals, establish agreement around intended outcomes/results, and assess and adjust the organization's direction in response to a changing environment. It is a disciplined effort that produces fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide what an organization is, who it serves, what it does, and why it does it, with a focus on the future. Effective strategic planning articulates not only where an organization is going and the actions needed to make progress, but also how it will know if it is successful.” The Balanced Scorecard Institute. (2017). The Basics of Strategic Planning, Strategic Management and Strategy Execution. Retrieved May 3, 2017, from https://www.balancedscorecard.org/BSC- Basics/Strategic-Planning-Basics
  28. 28. Strategic Planning Process Investigate • Audit organization’s current situation • Scan environment & emerging trends Consult • Identify stakeholder & market perceptions & expectations Consider & Decide • Analyze findings to determine strengths, weaknesses, opportunities & threats • Agree on mission, vision, strategies & specific action plans Do & Assess • Implement actions • Evaluate progress Phases Key Questions 1. Where are we now? 2. What is or will impact our market – & us? 3. What will happen if we continue in our current direction? 1. Who are those with a stake in our success – or demise? 2. How are we positioned in their work & minds? 3. What do they need to succeed? 1. SoWOT do these findings mean for us? 2. Where do we need to be in 3-5 years? 3. How will we get there? 4. What will success look like? 1. Who is accountable for doing what, when? 2. How are we managing our assessment? 3. Are we succeeding?
  29. 29. How Do We Know if We Are Achieving Success? Measure and Evaluate.
  30. 30. The Evaluation Framework 1. Engage Stakeholde rs 2. Describe Program 3. Focus Evaluation Design 4. Gather Credible Evidence 5. Justify Conclusions 6. Ensure Use and Share Lessons Adapted from the CDC Program Performance and Evaluation Office (https://www.cdc.gov/eval/framework/index.htm)
  31. 31. 1. Engage Stakeholders • Who is involved in program operations? • Who is served or affected by the program? • Who are the primary users of the evaluation?
  32. 32. 2. Describe the Program: The Logic Model
  33. 33. 3. Choose the Evaluation Design • Formative evaluation – Is the program designed to meet the identified need? – How can program operations be improved? • Process evaluation – Is program being implemented correctly? – Is the intended audience being reached? – Are clients satisfied? • Summative evaluation – Did the program achieve its goals? • Outcome evaluation – Did the program produce the intended outcomes? – How well did the program work? • Economic evaluation – What is the program ROI? – Is the program cost-effective? (Cost-benefit analysis) Formative and Process Evaluations are complementary. Summative Evaluations are done to inform future planning.
  34. 34. 4. Establish Criteria, Gather Evidence Evaluation Question Definition of Success Criteria for Success Indicators / Measures / Metrics Data source
  35. 35. Guiding Principles to Selecting Indicators • Ensure that the indicators are linked to the program goals and are able to measure change. • Ensure that standard indicators are used to the extent possible (to compare across studies). • Consider the cost and feasibility of data collection and analysis. • Keep the number of indicators to a minimum and include only those needed for program and management decisions or for reporting.
  36. 36. 5. Justify Conclusions • Link your conclusions to the evidence • Consider the conclusions against agreed-upon values or standards set by the stakeholders.
  37. 37. 6. Ensure Use & Share Lessons • Design the evaluation to achieve intended use by intended user. • Make sure all stakeholders are aware of the evaluation findings. • Prepare stakeholders throughout the project how different conclusions affect program operations. • Providing continuous feedback to stakeholders regarding interim findings. • Scheduling follow-up meetings with intended users to facilitate the transfer of evaluation conclusions into appropriate actions or decisions. Adapted from the CDC Program Performance and Evaluation Office (https://www.cdc.gov/eval/framework/index.htm)
  38. 38. Q & A
  39. 39. Thank You Rebecca Jones – Rebecca@dysartjones.com Kimberly Silk – Kim@brightsail.com
  • RadzmaAlfad

    Jul. 26, 2019

Presented by Rebecca Jones and Kimberly Silk at SLA Annual Conference, June 2018

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