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IndiaFood Processing IndustryCompiled by:Swiss Business Hub IndiaMumbai, December 2008Download: www.osec.ch      1 / 15
1.   Overview and Trends1.1 Food IndustryAccording to a study by McKinsey & Company, the Indian food market is poised to g...
The domestic food market, according to the India Food Report 2008 is estimated at over US$ 182 billion ac-counting for abo...
Primary food processing (packaged fruit and vegetables, milk, milled flour and rice, tea, spices, etc.) constitutesaround ...
Milk and milk products contribute to a significant 17% of the country’s total expenditure on food. Traditionaldairy produc...
India produced nearly 209.32 million tonnes of grains in 2005-06. India’s production covers all major grains –rice, wheat,...
369 freezing units with a daily processing capacity of 10’266 tonnes and 499 frozen storage units with a capac-ity of 134’...
years, prepared by Berry Bros. & Rudd, one of the oldest, independent wine merchants in Britain, suggests thatthe market f...
Following suit, the Darjeeling Tea Association (DTA) has mounted efforts to increase the production of organictea. Accordi...
High                                                                                      Mass market basic               ...
The Government has been supporting this segment through policy initiatives such as:• Automatic approval of foreign equity ...
Located in Geneva, Kimaco SA specialises in manufacturing cheese processing machines for the milk industryand is present i...
food processing and 51% FDI in single-brand food retailing, the next step will be allowing FDI in select fooditems, fresh ...
Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export   NCUI Building 3Development Authority (APEDA)                     Siri In...
National Research Development Corporation         20-22, Zamroodpur Community Center,                                     ...
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Bbf india foodprocessingindustry2009

  1. 1. IndiaFood Processing IndustryCompiled by:Swiss Business Hub IndiaMumbai, December 2008Download: www.osec.ch 1 / 15
  2. 2. 1. Overview and Trends1.1 Food IndustryAccording to a study by McKinsey & Company, the Indian food market is poised to grow from US$ 155 billion in2005 to US$ 310 billion by 2015 and US$ 344 billion in 2025 - at an approximate compounded annual growthrate of 4.1%..The development of the food industry in India stems from the consistently increasing agricultural output. Withthe second largest global arable land area, India is one of the key food producing countries in the world, sec-ond only to China. • Currently, India ranks second in fruit production and third in vegetable production in the world. • In 2007-08, food grain production in India had registered a 4.6% growth with 227.32 million tonnes as against 217.28 million tonnes in 2006-07, according to estimates by the Ministry of Agriculture. • The output of coarse cereals in 2007-08 was 39.67 million tonnes, 17% higher than the 33.92 million tonnes in the previous fiscal. • The total output of oilseeds is estimated to have risen to a record 28.2 million tonnes, about 16% higher than the 24.29 million tonnes in 2006-07. • The production of pulses has risen to 15.19 million tonnes, registering a year-on-year growth of 7% and touching a new high. According to estimates by the agri-trade promotion body, the Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA), Indias exports of agricultural and processed food products in 2007-08 has grown by 38%, which, in absolute value terms, is US$ 6.59 billion, against US$ 4.79 billion in 2006-07. 1.2 Food Processing India’s food processing industry is one of the largest industries in the country - it is ranked fifth in terms of production, consumption, export and expected growth. India is one of the world’s major food pro- ducers but accounts for only 1.7% (valued at US$ 7.5 billion) of world trade in this sector – this share is slated to increase to 3% (US$ 20 billion) by 2015.The Indian food processing industry is estimated at US$ 70 billion. According to the Ministry of Food Process-ing, this industry contributed 9% to India’s GDP and had a share of 6% in the total industrial production. Theindustry employs 1.6 million workers directly.Sustained by high agricultural output, international demand and a strong domestic market, the Indian food in-dustry offers ample scope for large investments in processing technologies, skills and equipment, packaging,refrigeration of frozen food and thermo processing.Currently, only 6% of the countrys fruit and vegetable produce is processed and Indias share of the globalmarket stands close to a dismal 0.03%. While the size of the global processed-food market is estimated at US$3.2 trillion and nearly 80% of agricultural products in the developed countries get processed and packaged (assuggested by India Food Report 2008, released at the Food Forum India, in Mumbai), there is huge scope forexport-led growth in this particular sector. Recognising this, in the next few years India aims at raising theshare of processed food to 20% in comparison to total agri-produce, on the one hand, and enhancing export ofthese items to 3% on the other.Download: www.osec.ch 2 / 15
  3. 3. The domestic food market, according to the India Food Report 2008 is estimated at over US$ 182 billion ac-counting for about 2/3rd of the total Indian retail market. India’s Competitive Advantages in Food Processing India Global Rank Share in Global ProductionArable Land (million hectares) 161 2 -Irrigated Land (million hectares) 55 1 -Coast Line (km) 8041 19 -Major Food Crops (MT) 35 3 4%Fruits (metric tonnes) 47 1 10%Vegetables (metric tonnes) 82 2 10%Rice/Paddy (metric tonnes) 132 2 22%Wheat (metric tonnes) 65 2 12%Milk (metric tonnes) 88 1 16%Sugarcane (metric tonnes) 289 2 21%Pulses (metric tonnes) 12 1 21%Tea (metric tonnes) 0.88 1 28%Edible Oilseed (metric tonnes) 25 3 7%Cattle (million) 226 1 20%Source: Cygnus report, India Food Processing Sector, 2005The steady economic growth is leading to a positive change in the lifestyle of the consumers and they are will-ing to pay a premium for both value-added private and branded products.Interestingly, the fact is that while the countrys GDP growth rate has increased from 3.5% in 2002-03 to 9% in2006-07, the food processing sector has grown from 7% to 13.1% during the same period. However, marketexperts are of the opinion that in future, the food products is going to increasingly contribute towards IndiasGDP growth.2. The Indian Food Processing Industry2.1 Structure and CompositionFood processing is a large sector that covers activities such as agriculture, horticulture, plantation, animal hus-bandry and fisheries. It also includes other industries that use agriculture inputs for manufacturing of edibleproducts. However, the Ministry of Food Processing, Government of India has defined the following segmentswithin the Food Processing industry:• Dairy, fruits and vegetable processing• Grain processing• Meat and poultry processing• Fisheries• Consumer foods including packaged foods, beverages and packaged drinking water.While the industry is large in terms of size, it is still at a nascent stage in terms of development. Out of thecountry’s total agriculture and food produce, only 2% is processed. The highest share of processed food is inthe grain processing and the dairy sector.Download: www.osec.ch 3 / 15
  4. 4. Primary food processing (packaged fruit and vegetables, milk, milled flour and rice, tea, spices, etc.) constitutesaround 60% of processed foods. It has a highly fragmented structure that includes thousands of rice-mills andhullers, flour mills, pulse mills and oil-seed mills, several thousands of bakeries, traditional food units and fruits,vegetable and spice processing units in the unorganised sector. In comparison, the organised sector is rela-tively small, with around 516 flour mills, 568 fish processing units, 5’293 fruit and vegetable processing units,171 meat processing units and numerous dairy processing units at state and district levels. Segment Dairy Fruit and Meat and Fisheries Packaged Beverages Staple Sector Vegetables Poultry foods foods ProcessingGrowth 15% 20% 10% 20% 8% 27% 85%rate of themarketKey Value Raw fruit Cattle, Marine Noodles/ Fruit-based Sugar,segments added milk and buffalo and fisheries, vermicelli drinks and wheat flour products vegetables, poultry frozen carbonated and salt like butter, fruit pulps, products drinks cheese canned and and ghee fruits and minced fish pickles productsExtent of 37% 2% 1% 12% - - -processingShare of 15% 48% 5% - 80% 77% 50%organisedsectorSource: http://www.investmentcommission.in/food_&_agro_products.htm and KPMG Analyses2.2 Sector-wise Analysis2.2.1 Dairy and ProbioticsThanks to “Operation Flood”, India today stands first in the world in terms of milk production .The output is ex-pected to be about 108 million tonnes (estimate for 2007), growing at a compounded annual growth rate of 4%.Consumption of milk has registered a growth of nearly 8.4% (in urban areas) and is currently valued at US$ 16billion.Within India, the dairy sector also ranks second in terms of proc-essed foods with 37% of the produce being processed. The or-ganised sector processes an estimated 15% of the total milkoutput in India. There are 676 dairy plants registered with Gov-ernment of India, which come under the organised sector.According to estimates of “Dairy India 2007”, the current size ofthe Indian dairy sector is US$ 62.67 billion and has been growingat a rate of 5% a year. Both production and consumption of milkand its derivatives are traditionally high in the country. The dairyexports in 2007-08 rose to US$ 210.50 million against US$113.57 million in the corresponding period, in the last fiscal,whereas the domestic dairy sector is slated to cross US$ 108billion in revenues by 2011.Download: www.osec.ch 4 / 15
  5. 5. Milk and milk products contribute to a significant 17% of the country’s total expenditure on food. Traditionaldairy products account for about 50% of the total milk produced. The market for dairy products is expected togrow at 15-20% over the next three years.• Ghee (or clarified butter) is the most widely marketed and branded product with a nation-wide penetration of24.1%. It is estimated to be growing at a rate of 8% per annum• The dairy whitener market comprises of sweetened milk powders, condensed milk and creamers. Its marketsize is estimated at US$ 450 million for 2005-06• The cheese market is estimated at US$ 2.49 million for 2005-06 (54’000 tonnes in volume terms), growing ata rate of nearly 10% per annum. The organised cheese market is dominated by proessed cheese which ac-counts for 74% market share• The ice-cream market in India is estimated at US$ 226 million in 2005-06, with the organised market at US$158.2 billion. This is currently growing at 20%.Probiotic dairy products - containing live organisms building immunity and helping in digestion - are an emerg-ing category in the Indian food market. Along with domestic dairy majors like, Amul and Mother Dairy, globalplayers like Nestle have made significant investments to capitalise the potential of this particula niche segment.The latest entrant is Yakult Danone with its investment worth US$ 28.3 million and an additional US$ 20.8 mil-lion on the cards for the next 2-3 years.According to the latest report on Indian Functional Foods and Beverage Markets by Frost & Sullivan, the mar-ket of neutraceuticals and probiotics earned revenues of over US$ 185 million in 2007 and is projected to touchan estimated US$ 1.16 billion in 2012. Although the segment is currently in its nascent stage, it is poised for anupswing riding piggy-back on a healthy domestic economy and awareness of health products, thus giving aboost to this segment.2.2.2 Fruits and VegetablesIndia produces the widest range of fruits and vegetables in the world. It is the second largest vegetable andthird largest fruit producer accounting for 8.4% of the world’s food and vegetable production. The share of or-ganised sector in fruit processing is estimated to be nearly 48%. Fruit production in India registered a growth of 3.9% during the period 2000-05 whereas the fruit processing sector grew several times faster at 20% over the same period. The total area under fruit cultivation is estimated at 4.18 million hectares. The total area under vegetable cultivation is estimated at 7.59 million hectares. However, less than 2% of the total vegetables produced in the country are commercially proc- essed, as compared to nearly 70% in Brazil and 65% in USA. India’s installed capacity for fruits and vegetable process- ing nearly doubled during the 1990s, from 1.1 million ton- nes in 1993 to 2.33 million tonnes in 2004. About 20% ofprocessed fruits and vegetables are exported. Major products exported include fruit pulps, pickles and chut-neys, canned foods, concentrated pulps and juices and vegetables.Fruit exports have registered a growth of 16% in volume and 25% in value terms in 2005-06. Mango andmango based products alone constitute 50% of these exports.2.2.3 Grain ProcessingDownload: www.osec.ch 5 / 15
  6. 6. India produced nearly 209.32 million tonnes of grains in 2005-06. India’s production covers all major grains –rice, wheat, maize, barley and millets like jowar, bajra and ragi. It ranks third in the production of grains in theworld. With a share of 40%, grain processing is the biggest component of food sector. Primary processing con-stitutes 96% with the remaining accounted for by the secondary and tertiary sectors.Total rice milling capacity in the country is 186 million tonnes. There are about 516 large flour mills in the coun-try, as well as about 10’000 pulse mills.Soya food segment is also growing due to increased health consciousness and abundant production of qualitysoya bean (3.72 million tons/year) in the country. Soya bean is grown mainly in Madhya Pradesh and meas-ures are being taken to extend its cultivation further2.2.4 Meat and Poultry ProcessingIndia has the largest number of livestock population in the world accounting for 50% of buffaloes and 16% ofthe goat population. Meat production grew at a CAGR 1 of 34% during the period 1999-2004 and stood at US$12.44 million in 2005-06. Meat exports stood at US$ 0.104 million in 2005-06.Most of the animals in India are not bred for meat. Animals generally used for production of meat are cattle,buffaloes, sheep, pigs and poultry. Only 11% of the buffalo population, 6% of the cattle, 33% of the sheep and38% of the goat population is culled for meat. Consumption per head of both fresh and processed meat is verylow at 1.5 kg compared with world average of 35.5 kg.Indian poultry meat market was approximately US$2.03 billion in 2005. The countrys poultry market isexpected to grow at 12% -15% per annum. At thesame time, fuelled by a booming retail sector, themarket for processed meat is also growing at an es-timated 15% - 20% per annum. Favourable condi-tions such as rising incomes and a young and urbanpopulation have fuelled increasing domestic demand.The rapidly growing sector offered investment oppor-tunities for foreign players in activities such as breed-ing, animal health, feed, equipment, processing andretail distribution.2.2.5 FisheriesIndia with its considerably long coastal lines enjoys a natural advantage in the marine food sector. India is thethird largest fish producer in the world and second in in-land fish production. The fisheries sector in India hasbeen classified into marine, inland and aquaculture. The fisheries sector contributes 1.1% to the country’sGDP. This segment also provides employment to 11 million people engaged fully, partially or in subsidiary ac-tivities pertaining to the sector.According to the estimates by Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA), Indian seafood ex-ports rose to US$ 1.55 billion during 2007-08. Frozen shrimp accounted for 52% of total marine exports at US$980 million followed by frozen fish at US$ 326 million.India’s fish production stood at a level of 6.7 million metric tons in 2007. Of this, about 60% (3.9 million tons)came from marine resources. Currently fish processing is mostly targeted for export markets. There are over1 CAGR = compounded annual growth rateDownload: www.osec.ch 6 / 15
  7. 7. 369 freezing units with a daily processing capacity of 10’266 tonnes and 499 frozen storage units with a capac-ity of 134’767 tonnes.Processed fish product exports include conventional block frozen products, individual quick frozen productsand minced fish products like fish sausage, cakes, cutlets, pastes etc.2.2.6 Packaged FoodsThe packaged foods segment in India registered a growth of 8% in 2005-06. Noodles/vermicelli is the fastestgrowing category in this segment with a CAGR at 15%. The market for branded noodles is estimated at 230million servings per year.The soups market is still small and nascent in India and is approximately US$ 14 million in value. The marketfor culinary products is estimated at US$ 475’000 and estimated to grow at 18% to 20% per annum. Productslike tomato ketchup and jams currently have low penetration levels, but are growing rapidly. Ketchups, for ex-ample, have a penetration of just 3% in India; however, this category is estimated to be growing at 20% perannum.2.2.6 BeveragesThe beverages market primarily consists of non-alcoholic beverages which can be broadly classified into car-bonated drinks, non-carbonated drinks and hot beverages. According to industry experts, the market for car-bonated drinks in India is worth US$ 1.8 billion while the juice and juice-based drinks market accounts for US$300.67 million, of the approximately US$ 2.38 billion packaged beverages category. Growing at a rate of 25%per cent, the fruit-drinks category is one of the fastest growing in the beverages market.The US$ 1.80 billion carbonated drinks category is expected to face the heat of the rising competition fromcategories falling under the health umbrella, i.e. juice and juice-based drinks, energy and sports drinks, maltedbeverages, probiotic drinks and bottled water. They are considered a socially acceptable alternative to alco-holic beverages.At US$ 300.67 million, the juice and juice drink category is among the fastest growing segments While fruitdrinks as a category is growing at 18% - 20%, carbonated soft drinks are growing at 6% - 8% driven by thepositive changes in India’s consumer profile.Hot beverages include health drinks such as white beverages (Horlicks, Bournvita, etc) and brown beveragessuch as tea/coffee as well as branded drinks (Boost). The total size of this market is estimated at US$ 333million by value and 85’000 tonnes by volume. White beverages account for 65% of the market and brown bev-erages constitute the remaining 35%. India is the largest producer of tea in the world accounting for 28% of the total global production, at 857 million kgs. Tea production in India has been growing at 1.2% per annum and India is the fourth largest exporter of tea in the world with estimated exports of US$ 5 million in 2002-03. India is also the fifth largest producer of coffee accounting for 4% of the total production in the world. Nearly 75% of India’s production is ex- ported and coffee exports stood at US$ 5.2 million in 2005-06. Additionally, the market for alcoholic beverageshas also been growing consistently. The Future of Wine, a report on the state of the wine industry over 50Download: www.osec.ch 7 / 15
  8. 8. years, prepared by Berry Bros. & Rudd, one of the oldest, independent wine merchants in Britain, suggests thatthe market for wine in India was growing at over 25 per cent per year.Approaching the milestone of one million cases a year, the Indian wine market has also recorded an impres-sive growth rate. An impressive 59.84% growth of wine production in Maharashtra bears testimony to the fact.Global wine majors have already set up shop in India to tap the vast potential.However, domestic companiescontrol 80% of the market and are way ahead of the MNCs, producing nearly 800’000 cases of wine in a year.And, while Bangalore, Chandigarh, Mumbai are reporting high growth in consumption, Nashik, the capital ofIndian wines, registered a 100% rise.Out of the total consumption of grape wine in India, around 80% wine consumption is from the major cities.Although alcohol consumption level in India is lower than the leading countries of the world, such as, Italy,France, USA, the future growth potential is immense.2.2.7 Staples – Bread, Wheat Flour, Salt and SugarBread is slowly coming to be a staple product consumed by people of all economic classes in India. Totalbread production in the country in 2004-05 was estimated at 2.7 million tons, growing at 7.5%. About 55% ofbread production comes from the organised sector.India is the second largest producer of wheat in the world with an output of more than 70 million tonnes.Branded ‘atta’ (wheat flour) is an important item in this segment with an estimated market of US$ 195 million.2.2.8 Snacks and ConfectioneryThe Indian market holds enormous growth potential forsnack food, which is estimated to be a market worth US$3 billion. The market is clearly and equally divided intothe organised and unorganised sector. The organisedsector of the snack food market is growing at 15% - 20%a year while the growth rate of the US$ 1.56 billion unor-ganised sector is 7% - 8%.Consumption level of commercial savoury snacks is 10times higher than that in the rural markets. Around 1’000snack items and 300 types of savouries are sold in India.The segment is largely dominated by potato chips andpotato-based products with over 85% share of the saltysnack market.2.2.8 Organic Food – An Emerging TrendWhile organic food and health food are emerging as a global trend in the food and food processing sector, In-dia remains a traditional grower and consumer of organic food. The global retail market for organic food hasgrown to US$ 100 billion from US$ 35 billion over the last three years. The exports of organic food from Indiahave grown to US$ 65 million over the past one year from US$ 21.6 million two years ago.Some players, like Navdanya, organically cultivates crops like jowar, bajra, millet, in its 21 acre farm in De-hradun and sells it from its retail outlets in Delhi and Mumbai. The number of such growers has been rising inthe Dehradun valley and Bundelkhand. APEDA in association with the Ministry of Agriculture has taken aninitiative to convert 20’000 farmers and a total area of 75’000 hectares to organic farming over the next threeyears.Download: www.osec.ch 8 / 15
  9. 9. Following suit, the Darjeeling Tea Association (DTA) has mounted efforts to increase the production of organictea. According to the industry experts, about 37% of the total crop grown on the slopes of the eastern Himala-yas, at present, is organic tea, as per certifications given by European and Japanese agencies. DTA is aimingto organically produce the majority of the champagne of teas by 2010.3. Attractiveness of Certain Segments in Food ProcessingIndia presents several potential growth areas in the food processing sector. Based on potential growth oppor-tunities and the enabling environment in terms of policy support, three key segments have been identified thatindicate high attractiveness.3.1 Mass Market Basic Foods3.1.1 Fruits and Vegetables SegmentSeveral factors make the fruits and vegetables sector inIndia attractive from a market size and growth perspective.As mentioned, India is a significant producer of fruits in theworld, contributing to 10% of global production. The fruitsand vegetables sector is growing rapidly at a healthy rateof 20% per annum. It is, however, nascent with penetrationlevel of about 10%. These factors indicate the high growthpotential in the sector. This is also highly unorganised atpresent, with the unorganised sector at 48% share, indicat-ing the scope for organised players to make an impact.Several policy measures have been undertaken by the Government to create the right stimulus for growth inthis sector. Some of the key initiatives include:• Foreign equity participation up to 51% allowed. Initiatives like post-harvest management, logistics given prior-ity in attracting FDI• Complete exemption from excise duty• Income tax rebate of nearly 100% of profits for new industries in fruits and vegetables sector• Many fruits and vegetables processing industries eligible for automatic approval of technology upgradation3.1.2 Meat, Poultry and Fisheries SegmentThe meat, poultry and fisheries segment is another high potential area that has the advantage of several favor-able factor conditions. In terms of raw material, India has the best supply of livestock in the world, accountingfor 50% of buffaloes and 16% of the goat population. India also ranks third in the world in production of fisher-ies. As mentioned earlier, the bulk of the livestock is not bred for slaughter.There is a large potential for setting up modern slaughter facilities and development of cold chains in meat andpoultry processing sector. In the fisheries segment also, India’s long coastline and network of inland waterwaysand lakes, offers plentiful availability of different types of fishes. Fishery resources in India are seriously under-utilised.The Government has also taken up several initiatives to encourage investment and growth in this segment.These include:• Foreign Equity participation allowed in the fisheries sector subject to approval. Foreign investment proposalson nearly US$ 210 million have been approved in this sector• Financial assistance given for setting up of processing infrastructure like IQF plants, refrigerating transportequipment, freezing plants• Excise duty on meat poultry and fisheries reduced from 16% to 8%.Download: www.osec.ch 9 / 15
  10. 10. High Mass market basic foods (fruit and vege- tables, meat, poultry and fisheries) Opportunities for growth Mass market value Niche market prod- added products (Dai- ucts (snack foods ry products) and packaged foods) Low Low High Policy attractiveness and Government Initiatives3.2 Mass Market Value-Added Products- Dairy, BakeryIndia is the world’s largest milk producer and dairy is the one of the most promising segments of food process-ing. Demand for dairy products is expected to grow at a healthy rate of 15% to 20% over the next five years.The segment offers a high potential for value addition – the level of processing value addition, at 37%, isamongst the highest in the food processing industry. At the same time the share of organised players is stillsmall, at 15%, indicating the potential for growth for organised players.Bakery products is a related segment that has also been growing strongly, at about 7.5%. The segment is stillhighly fragmented, though organised players have nearly 55% share of output.Both these segments, while indicating attractive growth potential, have also been focus areas for policy supportby the Government.• Foreign equity participation permitted to the extent of 51% in dairy processing sector• De-reservation of many segments like ice-cream and ghee from small-scale industries• Excise duty of 16% on dairy processing machinery fully waived for promotion of dairy processing• Subsequent to decanalisation, exports of some milk based products are freely allowed provided these unitscomply with the compulsory inspection requirements of concerned agencies like the National Dairy Develop-ment Board, Export Inspection Council, etc.3.3 Niche Market Foods - Snack Foods, Ready-to-Make Foods, Packaged FoodsThis business is characterised by high volumes and low margins. Penetration levels are yet quite low in thissegment, with product acceptance largely restricted to the urban population. Product innovation and brandingplay a key role in success of these products. As such, this segment could be an attractive option for multina-tional companies with established brands and strengths in innovation, to enter and get established in India.Download: www.osec.ch 10 / 15
  11. 11. The Government has been supporting this segment through policy initiatives such as:• Automatic approval of foreign equity participation up to 51%• Income tax rebate of 100% of profit for five years and 25% of profits for the next years for packaging of foods4. Government InitiativesThe Government of India has declared food processing a priority by introducing a number of progressivemeasures to set up and modernize food processing units, create infrastructure, support research and develop-ment and human resource development. • The National Policy aims to increase the level of food processing from 2% to 10% in 2010 and to 25% in 2025 • The level of institutional credit to be provided by banks and financial institutions has been increased from US$ 17.41 billion during 2003-04 to about US$ 23.76 billion in 2005-06 • Full repatriation of profits and capital is allowed • Automatic approvals for foreign investment up to 100%, except in few cases, and also technology transfer • The government has decided to give a boost to research and development in this sector with its deci- sion to set up the National Institute for Food Technology and Management in collaboration with Cornell University of the US. • Zero import duty on capital goods and raw material for 100 per cent export-oriented units. Custom duty on packaging machines reduced. Central excise duty on meat, poultry and fish reduced to 8% • Income tax rebate allowed (100% of profits for 5 years and 25% of profits for the next 5 years) for new industries in fruits and vegetables besides institutional and credit support. • The government would also set up abattoirs and dairies and will give a grant of US$ 3.1 million per ab- attoir and US$ 2.08 million per dairy.On the Government side, there is also a renewed enthusiasm to popularise organic food cultivation since ex-ports of organic food have grown to US$ 75.16 million over the past one year from US$ 25.05 million just twoyears ago.In a bid to boost the food sector, the Government is also developing 30 mega food parks which would cover theentire food processing cycle from the farm gate to the retail outlet. While the Government would provide agrant of US$ 12.53 million for each one, private investment to the tune of US$ 75.21 million would be encour-aged in these parks. The first five such parks would be set up in Punjab, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Jhark-hand and the North-East region in the first phases.5. Swiss Presence in India in the Food and Food Processing SectorNestlé’s relationship with India dates back to 1912, when it began trading as The Nestlé Anglo-Swiss Con-densed Milk Company (Export) Limited, importing and selling finished products in the Indian market. Today,with seven factories (the first one was set up in Moga, Punjab, in 1961) and a large number of co-packers,Nestlé India is the largest Swiss company in the food sector providing consumers in India with products ofglobal standards. Nestlé India manufactures products of truly international quality under internationally famousbrand names such as Nescafé, Maggi, Milkybar, Milo, Kit Kat, Bar-One, Milkmaid and Nestea and in recentyears the Company has also introduced products of daily consumption and use such as Nestlé Milk, NestléSlim Milk, Nestlé Fresh N Natural Dahi And Nestlé Jeera Raita.Bühler AG, Uzwil, has been active in India since the early 1990’s and today has its own manufacturing set up,Bühler India Pvt. Ltd., at Attibele near Bangalore. Bühler India underwent a factory expansion plan in 2007based on the success it is enjoying in the niche sector of grain processing (especially rice).Download: www.osec.ch 11 / 15
  12. 12. Located in Geneva, Kimaco SA specialises in manufacturing cheese processing machines for the milk industryand is present in India through a local agent. Other Swiss companies present ini Indian are EMS Chemie(through EMS Chemie Asia) and Givaudan through their own Indian subsidiary, actively doing business in theflavours and food extracts business.August 2008 saw the opening of the first chocolate academy in India by Swiss confectioner Barry Callebaut,extending the companys Asian presence to five markets. It is expected that the academy would be comple-mented by a local manufacturing facility before long, as Callebaut aims to take advantage of the tendency tobuy more premium products in increasingly rich urban areas.6. ConclusionsAs already mentioned at the beginning of this report, India is one of the world’s major food producers but ac-counts for about 1.7% of international food trade. This indicates vast scope for both foreign investors and ex-porters.The Indian food industry is widely recognised as a "Sunrise Industry" in India having huge potential for upliftingagricultural economy, creation of large scale processed food manufacturing and food chain facilities, resultantgeneration of employment and export earnings. India has enormous growth potentials from its current status ofbeing the worlds second largest food producer to be a worlds number one producer. The Indian food process-ing industry has the highest number of plants approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) outsidethe USA.India requires an investment of US$ 28 billion to bring the level of processing to 10% - 12% by 2012. It is ex-pected that in future bulk investments and modern food processing technologies are going to turn the fortunefor Indian food processing industry. Some of the most promising sub-sectors in the Indian food industry, asidentified by the Ministry of Food Processing, include: • Soft-drink bottling • Confectionery manufacture • Fishing and aquaculture • Grain-milling and grain-based products • Meat and poultry processing • Alcoholic beverages • Milk processing • Tomato paste • Fast-food • Ready-to-eat breakfast cereals • Food additives, flavors etc. • Mega food parks • Agri-infrastructure and supply chain integration • Logistics and cold chain infrastructure • Fruit and vegetable products • Animal products, meat and dairy • Wine and beer • Packaging machineryAccording to the estimates of the Ministry of Food ProcessingIndustry, currently, the food processing sector contributes nineper cent of the GDP and there is immense scope for furthergrowth. In a bid to give a boost to the sector, the government isconsidering a proposal to allow foreign direct investment (FDI)in the food retail sector. While 100% FDI is already allowed inDownload: www.osec.ch 12 / 15
  13. 13. food processing and 51% FDI in single-brand food retailing, the next step will be allowing FDI in select fooditems, fresh and processed fruit and vegetables, which may include retailing of farm and dairy produce, marineand poultry products. The initiative would underline inclusive growth in the food sector through marketing-driven farming, disciplined procuring from the farms, state of the art processing, and organised retailing. Some of the main key drivers of the Indian food industry are: • Food, beverages and tobacco industry dominates the Indian retail industry and is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of nearly 8% during 2008-2012. • Soft drinks market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of nearly 12% from 2008 to 2012, and major demand will be seen in health & energy drinks, bottled water and fruit juices. • Snack food market is estimated to grow at an annual rate of 18% to 20% in coming few years, albeit from a small base of consumers. • With growing health awareness and concern, the functional food & drinks market is set to grow rapidly in India. • Changing lifestyle, coupled with growing middle class population and changing eating habits, is an- ticipated to fuel 7%-10% growth in the Indian food service sector annually. • Low per capita consumption of alcoholic drinks makes the country highly lucrative to expand, with wine consumption projected to grow at a CAGR of nearly 23% in volume terms. In combination with the potential boom in the organised re- tailing sector, there is bound to be an increase in privatelabels, also in the food sector, which will provide a further thrust to the Indian food and food processing indus-tries.Swiss companies, active in the food and food processing, are well advised to seriously study the vast potentialon offer and plan a systematic entry in the Indian market. As a first step, they are advised to promote – to testthe market – their products through importers/distributors/agents. In this connection, they can utilise the ser-vices of Osec and the Swiss Business Hub India who have experience in conducting qualified business partnersearches working through their excellent network of specialised external consultants.Additionally, Swiss companies also have the possibility to gain first hand experience of the Indian food andfood processing sector by participating at the official Swiss Pavilion at the bi-annualy held Foodtec exhibitin inIndia. Osec collaborates closely with Kölnmesse in organising the Swiss pavilion.7. Important Contacts (in alphabetical order) Apex Contact Agency AddressAll India Food Processors Association 206, Aurobindo Place, Hauz Khas, New Delhi - 110016 Website: http://www.aifpa.net/index.phpDownload: www.osec.ch 13 / 15
  14. 14. Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export NCUI Building 3Development Authority (APEDA) Siri Institutional Area August Kranti Marg New Delhi – 110 016 Website: http://www.apeda.com/apedawebsite/index.aspNational Cooperative Development Corporation 4, Siri Institutional Area Hauz Khas New Delhi – 110 016 Website: http://www.ncdc.in/Cashew Export Promotion Council of India PB 1709, Chittoor Road Ernakulam Cochin - 682 016 Website: www.cashewindia.orgCentral Food Technological Research Institute CFTRI Mysore – 570 020 Website: http://www.cftri.com/index.htmlCentral Institute of Fisheries Technology CIFT Junction Willingdon Island Matsyapuri P.O. Cochin – 682 029 Website: http://www.cift.res.in/Coffee Board 1, Dr. Ambedkar Veedhi, Bangalore – 560 001 Website: http://www.indiacoffee.org/default.htmMarine Product Export Development Authority MPEDA House,(MPEDA) Panampilly Avenue PB No. 4272 Cochin – 682 036 Website: http://www.mpeda.com/Ministry of Food Processing Industries Panchsheel Bhavan August Kranti Marg New Delhi – 110 049 Website: http://mofpi.nic.in/index.htmMinistry of Agriculture Krishi Bhavan Dr. Rajendra Prased Road New Delhi – 110 001 Website: http://agricoop.ni.inNational Dairy Development Board (NDDB) PB No. 40 Anand – 388 001 Website: http://www.nddb.org/index.htmlNational Dairy Research Institute Karna l-132 001 Website: http://www.ndri.res.inDownload: www.osec.ch 14 / 15
  15. 15. National Research Development Corporation 20-22, Zamroodpur Community Center, Kailash Colony Extension, New Delhi – 110 048 Website: http://www.nrdcindia.com/Spices Board of India Sugandha Bhavan Cochin – 682 025 Website: http://www.indianspices.comTea Board of India 14, B.T.M. Sarani Kolkata 700 001 Website: http://teaboard.gov.in/Date: 5th of December 2008Author: Ashwin MerchantAuthor’s address: Swiss Business Hub India c/o Consulate General of Switzerland 102 Maker hambers IV 222 Nariman Point Mumbai 400 021 sbhindia@mum.rep.admin.chDownload: www.osec.ch 15 / 15

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