Android past present-future

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Android past present-future

  1. 1. Past, Present, Future Presented by Charlie Sanders
  2. 2. Charlie Sanders „ Twitter: @krnlsndrs „ GitHub: https://github.com/sandersch „ Blog: http://krnlsndrs.blogspot.com
  3. 3. What is Android?
  4. 4. What is Android? „ Linux-based operating system targeted at mobile devices „ Owned by Google „ Open Source, Apache License „ Java-based applications (apps)
  5. 5. Android and Google „ Android, Inc founded October 2003 „ Acquired by Google on August 17, 2005 „ Google wanted to offer an alternative to Apple’s iOS
  6. 6. Android and Open Source „ Google mostly publishes as Apache 2.0 „ Kernel changes and GNU utilities are GPL „ Third parties cannot use Google’s Android trademark unless Google certifies the device „ Many of Google’s ecosystem apps are proprietary „ Gmail, Maps,Youtube, Play Store,
  7. 7. Android and OEMs „ Hardware manufacturers may port Android to their devices at no cost „ Google works with a device partner on a flagship device whose specifications are chosen to push Android in the direction Google wants „ OEMs and carriers have no incentive to offer updates
  8. 8. Android System Architecture
  9. 9. Android System Architecture „ Linux Kernel „ Hardware Abstraction Layer „ Userland Libraries „ Dalvik (Android Runtime) „ Application framework
  10. 10. `
  11. 11. Android Linux Kernel „ Original fork based on 2.6 series, later rebased on 3.x series „ Merged back into mainline in 2012 (3.3/3.5) „ Android Kernel Unique Features: „  YAFFS2 flash file system „  Wakelocks/alarm timers (power management) „  “Paranoid” networking security patches „  Shared memory subsystem „  Process memory allocator
  12. 12. Userland Libraries „ Programs, libraries, and APIs implemented in a low-level language „ Usually written in C/C++ „ Many commonly used FOSS packages „ Android Debugger
  13. 13. DalvikVirtual Machine „ Java-compatible application framework „ Designed with mobile devices in mind „ Convert compiled class files into Dalvik Executable format (.dex) „ Register-based instead of typical stack-based architecture „ Just-in-time (JIT) compiler
  14. 14. Application Framework „ Interface available for Android app developers „ Principle of least privilege „ Each process has its own virtual machine (VM), so an application’s code runs in isolation from other applications.
  15. 15. Application Framework „ Application Components „ Activities – represent a single screen with a user interface „ Services – run in the background to perform long- running operations or remote interaction „ Content Providers – manage a shared set of application data „ Broadcast Receivers – respond to system-wide broadcast announcements
  16. 16. History of Android
  17. 17. Android 1.0 September 2008
  18. 18. Android 1.0 (Astro) „ Pull down notifications „ Home screen widgets „ Android Market „ First class Gmail support „ Google Maps „ Google Data Sync
  19. 19. T-Mobile G1 – October 22, 2008
  20. 20. Android 1.1 (Bender) „ February 2009 „ Primarily bug patches „ Over-the-air upgrade
  21. 21. Android 1.5 (Cupcake) „ May 2009 „ First to use dessert naming convention „ Extensive UI changes „ Soft keyboard „ Widget SDK „ Clipboard Improvements „ Video Capture and Playback
  22. 22. Android 1.6 (Donut) „ October 2009 „ Minor visual refinements „ CDMA support „ Support for different screen resolutions „ Universal search „ Redesigned Android market „ Improved camera interface
  23. 23. Android 2.0 November 2009
  24. 24. Android 2.0 „ Better Account Support and APIs „ Google Maps Navigation „ Quick Contact „ Soft keyboard improvements „ Revamped browser „ Live Wallpapers „ Speech-to-text „ New lock screen
  25. 25. Motorola Droid
  26. 26. Motorola Droid „ Exclusive toVerizon „ Start of very successful mobile franchise „ Improved build quality „ 854x480 display „ By far best physical keyboard on the market
  27. 27. Android 2.1 (Eclair) „ Not a major upgrade, hence no codename change „ Strategic shift for Google „ Choose to work directly with HTC to make its own flagship device „ Showcase Android without any modifications – like Google intended „ Extension of work began with Motorola Droid
  28. 28. Android 2.1 and Nexus One „ First Nexus device „ “Stock” Android experience „ One of the most well-regarded Android phones ever produced
  29. 29. Nexus One
  30. 30. Android 2.2 (Froyo) „ May 2010 „ Redesigned home screen „ New Gallery apps showcased 3D capabilities „ Better Copy / Paste support in Gmail „ Mobile hotspot support
  31. 31. HTC Evo 4G „ Beginning of the mobile size wars „ First popular Android device on Sprint „ Very heavily skinned
  32. 32. Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) „ December 2010 „ Reskinning of platform „ Improved on-screen keyboard „ Front-facing camera support „ NFC support „ Improved gaming API support
  33. 33. Nexus S
  34. 34. Android 3.x (Honeycomb) December 2010
  35. 35. Motorola Xoom
  36. 36. Motorola Xoom „ First officially sanctioned Android tablet „ Google worked closely with Motorola to showcase stock Android 3.0
  37. 37. Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) „ Fundamental redesign of Android UX „ New UI designed for tablets „ Redesigned home screen and widget placement, resizing „ Death of physical buttons – now all buttons are virtual „ Quick access System and Action Bars „ Redesigned keyboard
  38. 38. Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) „ New application layout options „ Fragments „ Multi-column layouts „ Better support for dealing with different screen resolutions and aspect ratios „ Improved Multitasking
  39. 39. Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) October 2011
  40. 40. Galaxy Nexus
  41. 41. Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) „ First release under Matias Duarte’s direction „ Galaxy Nexus „ First Nexus device with 4G wireless support „ Brought Honeycomb UX to smartphones „ Nearly universal critical acclaim
  42. 42. Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) „ New custom-designed typeface, Roboto „ Refreshed notification dropdown „ Soft keyboard improvements „ Complete overhaul of correction intelligence „ Inline spellcheck and replacement (much like iOS) „ Text entry, clipboard support, and soft keyboard finally feel as good as the best on the market
  43. 43. Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) „ Home screen folders and favorites „ Android Beam (NFC data transfer) „ Face unlock „ Data usage analysis „ New calendar and email apps „ No more Adobe Flash support
  44. 44. Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) „ June 2012 „ Nexus 7 „ Project Butter „ Google Now „ Expandable, actionable notifications „ Predictive text
  45. 45. Nexus 7 „ Reboot in Google’s tablet strategy „ Aimed at Kindle Fire and Nook „ A device for consuming content from Google’s store
  46. 46. Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) „ Project Butter „ Significantly improves graphics and touch performance „ Locks all drawing at 16ms „ Triple-buffering graphics „ Closing the gap with lag against iOS
  47. 47. Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) „ Google Now „ Entirely new platform for Google „ Provides context-aware “cards” of information „ Makes the information that Google knows about you available for your own use „ Weather „ Sports scores „ Traffic alerts „ Public Transit „ Flight updates „ Shipping notifications „ Calendar events
  48. 48. Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean) „ November 2012 „ Nexus 4/Nexus 10 „ Gesture Typing (like Swype) „ Multiple user support (tablets only) „ Wireless video sharing „ Lock screen widgets
  49. 49. Current State of Android
  50. 50. Android Ecosystem
  51. 51. Stock Android Apps „ Browser „ Clock „ Calculator „ Email „ Gallery „ Messaging „ Phone
  52. 52. Closed-source Google Apps „ Google Data Sync „ Play Store „ Gmail „ Google Maps/Navigation „ YouTube
  53. 53. Google Play Store „ Applications „ Music „ TV and Movies „ Books and Magazines
  54. 54. Gmail „ Archiving „ Filters „ Labels „ Threaded conversations „ Actionable notifications
  55. 55. Google Maps „ Accurate, reliable location data „ Turn-by-turn navigation „ Information on nearby locations „ Download maps for offline viewing
  56. 56. Third Party Apps „ Swype „ Dropbox „ Spotify/Pandora/Google Music/Rdio „ Netflix „ Barcode Scanner „ Amazon Kindle
  57. 57. Android Device Market
  58. 58. Nexus Devices
  59. 59. Nexus 4
  60. 60. Nexus 10
  61. 61. Samsung
  62. 62. Galaxy S3
  63. 63. Galaxy S4
  64. 64. Galaxy Note 2
  65. 65. Samsung Android Screen Sizes 2.6” 2.8” 3.14” 3.2” 3.4” 3.6” 3.65” 3.7” 3.8” 3.97” 4” 4.2” 4.27” 4.3” 4.5” 4.52” 4.65” 4.7” 4.8” 5” 5.3” 5.5” 5.8” 6.3” 7” 7.7” 8” 8.9” 10” 10.1”
  66. 66. HTC
  67. 67. HTC One
  68. 68. HTC First
  69. 69. Motorola „ Bought by Google on August 15, 2011 „ Google warned things wouldn’t change immediately due to “long pipeline” „ Rumors „ Stock Android „ “Just right” size „ X Phone
  70. 70. Future of Android
  71. 71. Leadership „ Google announced Andy Rubin was stepping down in March 2013 „ Replaced by Sundar Pichai, head of Chrome OS team
  72. 72. Android 5.0 (Key Lime Pie) „ Expected release at Google I/O (May 2013) „ Nexus partner rumors: Sony, LG „ Babble (unified messaging)
  73. 73. Beyond Smartphones and Tablets „ Set-top boxes „ Pivos „ Ouya „ Google TV/Fiber „ Gaming Systems „ Project Shield „ Wearable computing „ Pebble „ Google Glass „ FitBit „ Cameras

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