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45 Years in the Making: The Restoration of
a Northern Alabama Black High School to
a Community Center
Integrated Communica...
2	
Board Members
Rebekah Davis
Charlotte Fulton
Edward Gilbert
Masheldia Green
Kristina Hendrix
David Malone
Richard Marti...
3	
Executive Summary
The Athens-Limestone Community Association (ALCA) was
formed in 1981 and reorganized in 2007. Its pri...
4	
Timeline
•  City of Athens and the Athens-Limestone Community Association received a
Community Development Block Grant ...
5	
Research
History
Trinity High School was Athens and Limestone County’s only black high school
before integration. It wa...
6	
Research
12/23/15, 2:39 PMADECA News Release
Page 1 of 2http://www.media.alabama.gov/AgencyTemplates/adeca/adeca_pr4.as...
7	
Planning
February 2014
Kristina Hendrix, APR offered to volunteer to develop and implement
all of ALCA’s public relatio...
8	
Planning
Initial Positioning Presentation given to the ALCA Board
9	
Planning
Initial Positioning Presentation given to the ALCA Board
(continued)
10	
Planning
Once there was a dedicated public relations practitioner
supporting ALCA, a strategic communications plan was...
11	
February 2014
ALCA held its first Black History Celebration in 2014. It was widely
attended although there was very li...
12	
Implementation
Advertising Businesses Churches Classifieds Government Medical
Real Estate Schools Movies Weather Email...
13	
Implementation
September 2014
The City of Athens recommended the Trinity High School
renovation project be delayed unt...
14	
Implementation
November 2014
The ALCA board decided to hold a leadership and
organizational workshop to outline board ...
15	
Implementation
The leadership and organizational workshop yielded a vast
improvement in how the board operated. Simple...
16	
2014
Fundraising
and Increase
Awareness
2015
Construction
and
Continued
Awareness
2015
Grand
Opening
Implementation
20...
17	
Implementation
January-August 2015
Construction began on the community center in January 2015.
Many media outlets cove...
18	
Implementation
February 2015
ALCA, in partnership with the City of Athens and Spirit of Athens, a
downtown revitalizat...
19	
Implementation
February 2015
The Second Annual Black History Program garnered more than 300
people attending and more ...
20	
Implementation
Summer 2015
The board held numerous meetings to discuss how to proceed with
landscaping, interior décor...
21	
Implementation
September 2015
The Athens Rotary Club, a long-time partner of ALCA, gave
$15,000 for landscaping the Tr...
22	
Implementation
October/November 2015
The board planned numerous activities leading up to the grand
opening and ribbon ...
23	
Implementation
The former logo incorporated elements
from Trinity and Fort Henderson. The
school colors and the dates ...
24	
Implementation
October/November 2015
The three events were the main events leading up to the completion
of the signatu...
25	
Implementation
November 2015
The following products were used for the Honoring Trinity
School Day and the Community La...
26	
Implementation
November/ December 2015
The board had an opportunity to add more activities leading up
to the grand ope...
27	
Implementation
December 2015
The lead up period to the Pincham-Lincoln Center’s Grand
Opening and Ribbon Cutting Cerem...
28	
Implementation
Shareable: 398 views,
8 likes and 1 share
Before
and After:
1,245
views, 17
likes and
12 shares
Pincham...
29	
Implementation
The fountain
was restored
with
monuments
that were
around the
complex.
The Long Live Trinity 16 foot mu...
30	
Implementation
31	
Evaluation
Community Relations
There were five tactics that ALCA originally outlined
but then added three more totalin...
32	
Evaluation
Media Relations
There was an aggressive media relations strategy in
place for all activities leading up to ...
33	
Evaluation
Media Relations
WAFF-48 News , WHNT-19 News,
and Athens News Courier covered
the grand opening and used all...
34	
Evaluation
Social Media
ALCA began a Facebook page on December 7th. Within the 24
hours, the page had 100 likes. By th...
35	
Evaluation
Special Events
The grand opening event had been 45 years in the making. Many
people wanted to donate their ...
36	
Evaluation
Special Events
Table 2. Center’s Permanent Expenses
Tactic Expense
ALCA Flag $150
Brick Display $800
Chairs...
37	
Evaluation
Overall Goal and Objectives
The overall goal of the project:
To restore the former Trinity High School (ALC...
38	
Appendices
A.  Positioning Plan
B.  Board Organization Workshop Recap
C.  Pincham-Lincoln Center Communications and Lo...
S
Athens Limestone
Community Association:
Positioning for the Future
Presented by Kristina Hendrix, APR
Overview
S Where are we now?
S Where do we want to go?
S Who do we want to get involved?
S How can we start?
S Trinit...
SWOT Analysis
Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
Let’s look at where we are today!
ALCA Strengths
S 501 C 3 Status
S Strong Mission, Vision, and Goals
S Solid Board of Directors
S Built-in Audience
S ...
ALCA Weaknesses
S Name that doesn’t resonates with the
mission
S Similar Age Demographic
S Small number of revenue- gen...
ALCA Opportunities
S  Unique mission from other non-profits
S  Interesting story to share
S  Reach a younger demographi...
ALCA Threats
S  Other non-profits (Existing and Emerging)
S  Lack of interest by community members
S  Loss of financial...
Fiscal Position
Positioning
S Keep the ALCA brand visible
S Expand the reach of ALCA efforts
S Become the premier non-profit for the
co...
Current vs. Future Target Audiences
Current Audiences Future Audiences
Trinity HS Alumni Athens/Limestone Community
Member...
Getting Started
S  Build a diverse coalition
S  Start a social media presence
S  Write opinion editorials/articles for ...
S
Athens Limestone
Community Association:
Positioning for the Future
Trinity HS Project Initial Start
S Perform informal and formal research
about the current state of the project
S Educate...
Imperial Centre for the Arts and Sciences
Rocky Mount, NC
Arts, Science, Theater, Facility Rental, and Children’s Museum
Real Life Example: Imperial Centre
S  City-owned/operated museum and cultural
arts center; Managed by the Parks and
Recre...
Benefits of the Trinity HS Project
S Make this an attraction for Athens
S Tells the ENTIRE Athens and Limestone
County S...
S
Athens Limestone
Community Association:
Positioning for the Future
1	
Athens-Limestone	Community	Center		
Board	Retreat	Recap	and	Actions	
November	11,	2014	
	
Major	Topics	of	Discussion	
•...
2	
	
Communications	Products	
• Website	that	will	accept	book	sales	and	donations	
• Letterhead	
• Envelope	
• Note	card/S...
3	
• Memorials-	Either	on	paper	or	with	a	plaque	in	the	building	for	people	who	have	
donated	to	ALCA	in	memory	of	someone...
Revised:	October	2,	2015	
	
	
	
Athens-Limestone	Community	Association	
Pincham-Lincoln	Center		
Grand	Opening	and	Ribbon	...
2	
	
Overview	
The	Athens-Limestone	Community	Association	(ALCA)	is	nearing	the	completion	of	
the	Pincham-Lincoln	Center....
3	
	
	
Strategies	
• Community	Relations	
• Media	Relations/Social	Media*	
• Special	Event	Planning	
*If	the	ALCA	Board	ag...
4	
WAFF-TV	Noon	Show	 November/December	
WHNT-TV	Noon	Show	 November/December	
Cooper	and	Company	 November/December	
Athe...
5	
	
Closing/Enter	the	Center/Reception	
	
Special	Event	Logistical	Support	
The	following	items	will	be	needed	to	success...
6	
• Exterior	signs-	Kristina	is	working	with	Athens	Sign	Company	now.	She	
should	have	new	drafts	for	board	review	and	ap...
Media	Report	
Publication/Media	
Outlet	
Date	 Topic	
WHNT-TV	(CBS)	 June	2012	 Preservation			
Athens	News	
Courier	
May	...
606 Trinity Circle Ÿ P.O. Box 1476 Athens, AL 35612
	
  
	
  
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
45 Years in the Making: Grand Opening...
606 Trinity Circle Ÿ P.O. Box 1476 Athens, AL 35612
supported our efforts to enhance the Trinity-Fort Henderson site for ...
Subject: MEDIA ADVISORY: ALCA and Athens Rotary Club to host Community Landscaping Day
From: Kristina L. Hendrix, APR (kri...
Athens-Limestone Community Association
Public and Community Relations Lead
kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com
256-777-9414
Attachm...
Subject:
FEATURE STORY: Athens-Limestone Community Association Announces Upcoming Events and Ribbon
Cutting
From: Kristina...
Athens Working to Preserve Trinity Site, WHNT-19 News, 2012
Holding The Fort Book Sales, Al.com, 2014
100–Year Old Woman W...
1	
David	Malone	stands	gazing	over	the	campus	of	Trinity	School	where	he	graduated	in	1966,	seeing	only	
in	 his	 mind’s	 ...
2	
	
century;	and	dozens	of	teachers	and	preachers	who	staffed	Limestone	County’s	rural	African-American	
schools	and	fill...
3	
	
Center	planned	for	Dec.	17th;	and	productions	of	Arise	and	Build,	a	musical	play	based	on	the	history	of	
Trinity	 Sc...
Kristina	Hendrix,	APR	
Athens	Limestone	Community	Association		
Public	and	Community	Relations	Lead	
kristinalhendrix@yaho...
The	ALCA	Board	President	Edward	Gilbert	accepted	the	donations	on	behalf	of	the	
organization.	“We	appreciate	the	support	...
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45 Years in the Making: Pincham-Lincoln Center Grand Opening

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The signature project has been named a National Finalist in the 2016 Ragan Communications Nonprofit Public Relations Awards competition, http://www.prdaily.com/mediarelations/Articles/21163.aspx.

The Athens-Limestone Community Association renovated the historic Trinity High School into the Pincham-Lincoln Center. Founded in 1865 by the American Missionary Association, Trinity was the only high school for black students in Limestone County, Alabama before integration. The school was built on Fort Henderson, an earthen-work fortress built by Union soldiers during the American Civil War. The school closed in 1970 due to a desegregation court order. ALCA, started in 1981, made Trinity and Fort Henderson its mission to preserve one of Athens' oldest historical landmarks. Through a partnership with ALCA, City of Athens and Limestone County, grants and years of fundraising, ALCA was proud to open the Pincham-Lincoln Center at the Trinity-Fort Henderson Complex 45 years after the school closed.

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45 Years in the Making: Pincham-Lincoln Center Grand Opening

  1. 1. 45 Years in the Making: The Restoration of a Northern Alabama Black High School to a Community Center Integrated Communications Summary November 2013 - December 2015 Kristina L. Hendrix, APR Communications Consultant and Board Member
  2. 2. 2 Board Members Rebekah Davis Charlotte Fulton Edward Gilbert Masheldia Green Kristina Hendrix David Malone Richard Martin Ronnie Smith Carolyn Williams Jimmy Woodroof
  3. 3. 3 Executive Summary The Athens-Limestone Community Association (ALCA) was formed in 1981 and reorganized in 2007. Its primary mission was to preserve the former Trinity High School, Athens and Limestone County, Alabama’s only all-black high school before integration, and the Union fort that was used during the American Civil War, Fort Henderson. It is located in Northern Alabama. ALCA began forming a partnership with the City of Athens and Limestone County Commission to make this project a priority. The former school is located in Athens and when it was open it was a private school before being included in the Limestone County School District. In 2013, significant progress was made to restore the former school. Then in February 2014, ALCA obtained volunteer public relations support to help promote the Trinity renovation project as well as the organization as a whole. This document will outline the integrated communication strategy developed during the two-year period leading up to the grand opening of the newly named Pincham-Lincoln Center, the former Trinity High School.
  4. 4. 4 Timeline •  City of Athens and the Athens-Limestone Community Association received a Community Development Block Grant from the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs to renovate the former Trinity High School to be used as a community center November 2013 • ALCA Board Members voted Kristina Hendrix, APR to become the Community and Public Relations Lead to support the board in all projects •  ALCA held its inaugural Black History Celebration fundraising event February 2014 • ALCA received $75,000 total from The City of Athens, Limestone County Commission, and the State of Alabama for the renovation projectMay 2014 •  ALCA, Architect Jeff Tosh, and the City of Athens Department of Public Works collaborated on the renovation project to get the project to a reasonable cost •  ALCA released the book, Holding The Fort, a historical look at Trinity High School Summer 2014 •  The City of Athens recommended the Trinity High School renovation project be delayed until ALCA received more funding •  ALCA started an online crowdfunding campaign and a letter-writing campaign to raise additional funds September 2014 • ALCA board held a leadership and organizational workshop to outline board responsibilities and begin planning for 2015November 2014 • The City of Athens began the construction and renovationJanuary 2015 • ALCA held the Second Annual Black History Celebration fundraising eventFebruary 2015 • Construction was completed • ALCA Board Members voted to name the community center the Pincham- Lincoln Center at the Trinity-Fort Henderson Complex Summer 2015 • Athens Rotary Club gave ALCA $15,000 for the Pincham-Lincoln Center’s landscapingSeptember 2015 • ALCA board planned and executed numerous events and activities leading up the Pincham-Lincoln Center’s grand openingNovember 2015 • ALCA opened the Pincham-Lincoln Center at the Trinity-Fort Henderson ComplexDecember 2015
  5. 5. 5 Research History Trinity High School was Athens and Limestone County’s only black high school before integration. It was open from 1865-1970 and founded by the American Missionary Association. Trinity High School was a private school and then in the mid-1940’s it was acquired by the Limestone County Schools Board of Education until it closed in 1970. In 1981, the Athens-Limestone Community Association was founded to renovate the school so it could be used a community center. In 2007, ALCA reorganized with a renewed spirit to continue to the project. There were a number of black schools in North Alabama that had the same fate as Trinity. They were either abandoned, demolished, or renovated. •  Huntsville’s Councill High School- Abandoned •  Florence’s Burrell-Slater High School- Renovated to a community center •  Sheffield’s Sterling High School- Demolished •  Decatur’s Lakeside High School- Renovated to an elementary school •  Scottsboro’s Carver High School- Demolished ALCA, The City of Athens, and Limestone County wanted to preserve this historical site so a partnership was formed. Each organization understood the significance of this project and how it was in their best interest to save this landmark because the area of the city it was in was a blighted and neglected community. Funding Needed The City of Athens began researching grants that could be used to renovate the former school as none of the three main organizations had enough funds for the complete renovation. Once a grant was identified, ALCA funded a grant writer. The grant was a Community Development Block Grant from the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA). In November 2013, ADECA granted the City of Athens $250,000 to renovate Trinity. The grant was later increased to $290,000. ALCA then started their own campaigns to raise additional funds to complete the project. Funds came from corporations and individual donors.
  6. 6. 6 Research 12/23/15, 2:39 PMADECA News Release Page 1 of 2http://www.media.alabama.gov/AgencyTemplates/adeca/adeca_pr4.aspx?id=8314 (To Print this page, press the "Print" button on your browser. To return to the previous page, close this window.) November 8, 2013 Governor awards funding for improvements in Tennessee Valley MONTGOMERY—Gov. Robert Bentley has awarded more than $1.25 million in Community Development Block Grants for improvements in four north Alabama municipalities. Tuscumbia was awarded a $308,422 grant to upgrade water services and fire protection in one section of the city, and Athens was awarded a $250,000 grant to construct a community center. New Hope plans to make sewer improvements with a $350,000 grant, while the town of Hillsboro will use a $349,850 grant for drainage improvements. “Community Development Block Grants provide essential resources that help Alabama counties, cities and towns address urgent public needs,” Bentley said. “I am pleased to assist local officials with projects that will improve life in their communities.” Tuscumbia will replace deteriorated water lines in the Stuart/North Milton neighborhood. The new water lines will eliminate rust-colored water caused by older metal pipes and boost water pressure, improving service and fire-fighting capabilities. Athens will use its grant funding to convert the historic Trinity High School into a community center. The center will be available for senior-citizen and after-school programs, community meetings and activities and for private functions. The school is located at the site of Fort Henderson, an earthen-work fortress built by Union Soldiers during the Civil War. New Hope will replace sewer lines in the Maple Road neighborhood, an area with about 211 residents. The city will upgrade sewer pump stations to alleviate sewage backup in houses and overflows at manholes. Hillsboro will address some health and safety concerns by improving drainage in the Davis Road subdivision and in a small housing area along Lawrence County Road 400. The project will minimize flooding and standing water in the area. ADECA approves of the grant for the City of Athens and ALCA’s signature project.
  7. 7. 7 Planning February 2014 Kristina Hendrix, APR offered to volunteer to develop and implement all of ALCA’s public relations strategy. The board accepted her offer. At the February 2014 board meeting, Hendrix outlined a positioning plan that showed board members how to increase visibility and raise awareness about the project. The overall goal of the project: To restore the former Trinity High School (ALCA’s signature project) to be used as a community center The communication objectives: • To increase awareness by 50% about the Trinity renovation project to the residents of Athens and Limestone County during 2014 and 2015 • To obtain new donors from different target audiences identified for the signature project during 2014 and 2015
  8. 8. 8 Planning Initial Positioning Presentation given to the ALCA Board
  9. 9. 9 Planning Initial Positioning Presentation given to the ALCA Board (continued)
  10. 10. 10 Planning Once there was a dedicated public relations practitioner supporting ALCA, a strategic communications plan was devised. Year one, 2014, was dedicated to fundraising and increase awareness about ALCA and its mission. Year two, 2015, was dedicated to construction and awareness about the community center and continued financial support to ALCA. 2014 Fundraising and Increase Awareness 2015 Construction and Continued Awareness 2015 Grand Opening
  11. 11. 11 February 2014 ALCA held its first Black History Celebration in 2014. It was widely attended although there was very little publicity for the event. While at the event, board members asked attendees to make a donation. In one night, more than $12,000 was collected. Implementation May 2014 ALCA received a collective $75,000; $25,000, each from the State of Alabama, Limestone County and the City of Athens. ALCA released this photo and news release to the local media. (See products in the rear of this document.) ALCA board members accept funds from State Representative Dan Williams, Limestone County Commission Chairman Stanley Menefee, and Athens Mayor Ronnie Marks.
  12. 12. 12 Implementation Advertising Businesses Churches Classifieds Government Medical Real Estate Schools Movies Weather Email us ShopAthensFirst Previous Page ALCA Hosts “Holding The Fort” Book Signing With Author Charlotte Fulton ATHENS, ALABAMA - Athens and Limestone County have a magnificent story to share about how generations of African-Americans were educated during the Civil War era through the American Civil Right Movement at the Trinity School. Holding The Fort, by acclaimed author Charlotte Fulton, is a book that tells the intimate story of how self-sacrificing white missionary teachers came to establish schools for freedmen after the Civil War. Holding The Fort details the sacrifice, determination, and perseverance of African-American students in Limestone County who stood bravely to obtain a better future for them and their families. Hosted by the Athens Limestone County Association, author Charlotte Fulton will be autographing copies of Holding The Fort at the Trinity High School Grand Reunion Picnic on Friday, August 29 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Lincoln-Bridgeforth Park located on Hine Street; and during the Trinity Grand Reunion Parade on Saturday, August 30 11 a.m. to 2p.m. at Pablo’s on Market. Starting Tuesday, September 2, additional copies of Holding The Fort can be purchased at the Limestone County Archives or from ALCA board members. The cost is $40 if picked up in Athens and an additional $7 if it has to be shipped. Profits from the sale of Holding The Fort will be to benefit the construction of the new Trinity Community Center. For more information, visit www.athenslca.org. Kristina Hendrix, APR Athens Limestone Community Association Public and Community Relations Lead kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com ALCA host Holding the Fort book signing http://www.athensplus.com/holding-the 1 of 2 12/27/15, August 2014 ALCA commissioned author Charlotte Fulton to write a book about the history of Trinity High School. Fulton spent five years researching and writing the book. In August 2014, Holding The Fort was released. The book sales were used to benefit the construction and ongoing operation of the community center. Three media outlets picked up the release: AL.com, Athens Plus, and the Athens News Courier. Alabama Christmas Scenes from Stevenson: Alabama designer turns historic 3-story [http://connect.al.com/staff/KKazek/index.html] By Kelly Kazek | kkazek@al.com [http://connect.al.com/staff/KKazek/posts.html] Email the author | Follow on Twitter [https://twitter.com/KellyKazek] on August 29, 2014 at 10:25 AM, updated August 29, 2014 at 10:45 AM ATHENS, Alabama [http://www.al.com/local/limestone/index.ssf] – For the past five years, local historian and retired journalist Charlotte Fulton has researched the history of Trinity School, the Athens school where black students were educated until integration in 1970. The result of her work is a book detailing the history of the school and its impact on the community, including some tales of famous graduates. Fulton's book, "Holding the Fort: A History of Trinity School in Athens, Alabama," a name derived from the fact that a Union fort stood on the site [http://alabama.travel/places-to-go/fort-henderson-historic-site-and-trinity-high-school] of the school during the Civil War, is being launched with book signings today and Saturday. The book traces the history of the school from its founding in 1865 for the education of freedmen. The school is now a derelict building on Brownsferry Street, but the Athens Limestone County Association plans to build a community center at the site and later create a museum to house the school's memorabilia. Proceeds from sale of the book go toward the building projects. This weekend's book signings coincide with the Grand Trinity Reunion, held every two years for anyone who attended the school. As many as 600 people are expected at the reunion. Fulton, who said she became interested in the history of the school while writing for The News Courier in Athens, talked with many surviving Trinity graduates to weave the tale, beginning with the white missionary teachers who established schools for freedmen after the Civil War. Fulton will be signing copies of the book during the reunion picnic from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. today at Lincoln-Bridgeforth Park on Hine Street. She will also sign books at Pablo's on Market in downtown Athens from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday during the Trinity Grand Reunion Parade. Beginning Tuesday, copies of "Holding the Fort" can be purchased at the Limestone County Archives in downtown Athens or from ALCA board members. Books are $40 each, plus $7 for shipping. For more information, visit www.athenslca.org [http://www.athenslca.org] . Related Stories Group hoping to make landmark of Athens' historic black high school launches book tracing its past Group hoping to make landmark of Athens' historic black high ... http://www.al.com/living/index.ssf/2014/08/group_hoping_to_... 1 of 2 12/27/15, 6:27 PM
  13. 13. 13 Implementation September 2014 The City of Athens recommended the Trinity High School renovation project be delayed until adequate funding was secured by ALCA. ALCA began two campaigns: •  Letter writing campaign to individual donors, churches, and other corporations. These letters were mailed or distributed. •  Online crowdfunding campaign using Go Fund Me. This campaign was launched to reach a new target audience. The link was posted on board members’ personal social media pages since the board had not agreed upon a branding strategy for the organization. Nearly $2,000 was raised in the first month on the online platform and even more through the other campaign.
  14. 14. 14 Implementation November 2014 The ALCA board decided to hold a leadership and organizational workshop to outline board responsibilities and begin planning for 2015. The City of Athens confirmed that construction would begin on the project in January 2015 since funding had been secured from donations and a $40,000 addition from the ADECA grant. ALCA knew that going into 2015 they needed reorganize much of their operating procedures leading up to the construction of the community center. They also knew they needed to identify an integrated branding strategy. Former Mission Statement To create a historical reflection of the Browns Ferry Street site whose ties to the antebellum times, Civil War at Fort Henderson (“The Fort”) which included many African-American soldiers from this area serving in the U.S. Army, the American Missionary School for freed slaves which later became known as Trinity High School – all providing a significant impact to Athens, Alabama and abroad. Current Mission Statement To create a connection between the history and the future of Athens and Limestone County through quality programs and stimulating activities. Current Vision Statement The Athens-Limestone Community Association aims to inform and engage with the public through cultural, educational, and historical activities that will honor the past and enrich the lives of current and future generations. The former mission and vision statements were not inclusive of the organization and left the organization with no future once the signature project was completed.
  15. 15. 15 Implementation The leadership and organizational workshop yielded a vast improvement in how the board operated. Simple tools as a flip chart and frank discussions helped to start the conversation and set the stage for 2015. Notes were taken and an action list was given to all board members following the workshop. (It is included in the rear of this document.) Six pages of notes were taken on the flip charts that included the following: •  Likes and dislikes about the organization •  New Vision and Mission Statement •  Board Roles •  Communication Products •  2015 Black History Program •  2015 Calendar of Events •  Revenue-Generating Streams
  16. 16. 16 2014 Fundraising and Increase Awareness 2015 Construction and Continued Awareness 2015 Grand Opening Implementation 2015 was the year ALCA focused on creating awareness to its target audiences that community center was being renovated and more funding was needed. It had been 150 years since the school opened and 45 years since the school closed. Using those two anniversary dates helped to resonate with target audiences as they understood the significance of those dates. The City of Athens began construction in January of 2015. The board also reiterated all official correspondence was to go through the Community and Public Relations Lead as 2015 was a very important year for the organization. They wanted a consistent and professional look for all products.
  17. 17. 17 Implementation January-August 2015 Construction began on the community center in January 2015. Many media outlets covered the ongoing construction. Here are pictures from beginning to end in August. The landscaping and the interior’s décor were last to be completed. Mid-2012 January 2015 August 2015 CBS affiliate WHNT-19 News has covered the ongoing renovation since 2012. •  January 2015 •  June 2012
  18. 18. 18 Implementation February 2015 ALCA, in partnership with the City of Athens and Spirit of Athens, a downtown revitalization organization, held the Second Annual Black History Program. This was the official black history program for the City of Athens. This year, more preparation was used to create awareness about the program and ALCA’s signature project. The following communication products were implemented: •  Press Release •  Flyer •  Printed Program •  Speech
  19. 19. 19 Implementation February 2015 The Second Annual Black History Program garnered more than 300 people attending and more than $7,000 in donations. NBC affiliate WAFF-48 and the Athens News Courier covered the event. Pictured here are guest keynote speaker Dr. Robert Mayberry and the entertainment, the Committed Acapella Chorus.
  20. 20. 20 Implementation Summer 2015 The board held numerous meetings to discuss how to proceed with landscaping, interior décor, rental agreements, and how to promote the grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony. During this time, the board voted to name the community center the Pincham-Lincoln Center. It was named for two Trinity graduates who were integral to the revival of the school as well as benefactors for the project. The two men were Judge R. Eugene Pincham and Dr. C. Eric Lincoln. The board did not want to lose the Trinity name recognition since the community knew the area for Trinity High School. The new name for the existing Pincham Athletic Field, forthcoming Fort Henderson Memorial, along with the community center, was voted as the Trinity – Fort Henderson Complex because of the former school and Fort Henderson was the name of the Union fort where black soldiers fought for their freedom during the American Civil War. The board also discussed implementing a new branding strategy since most of the work pertaining to the signature project was completed and the organization’s brand needed an update. The initial logo for the organization was not in keeping with the new mission and vision statements that were implemented in November 2014.
  21. 21. 21 Implementation September 2015 The Athens Rotary Club, a long-time partner of ALCA, gave $15,000 for landscaping the Trinity-Fort Henderson Complex. Rotary contracted with Grayson Bailey Landscaping to manage the project. The board decided to wait until November when the weather was cooler to plant the trees and grass. This update was posted on ALCA board members’ personal social media pages and in the Athens News Courier. The board set the grand opening for December. The Community and Public Relations Lead presented an integrated communications plan leading for strategies and tactics leading up to the grand opening. (The plan is in the rear of this document.)
  22. 22. 22 Implementation October/November 2015 The board planned numerous activities leading up to the grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony in December. The strategies included the following: •  Community Relations •  Traditional Media Relations and Social Media •  Special Events Planning The tactics were diverse so that they reached many of the target audiences. More than 20 different tactics were executed. October and November were used to prepare the media and ALCA partners and supporters to make them aware of the upcoming opening. Communication products such as a feature story and in- depth media interviews were pitched early. Links to the stories published are in the integrated communications plan.
  23. 23. 23 Implementation The former logo incorporated elements from Trinity and Fort Henderson. The school colors and the dates for the fort and the opening and closing of the school are represented. The name of the organization is not listed in the logo. The new logo includes the former school’s colors, purple and gold and the organization’s name. The people are different colors and sizes to represent the community as a whole and the curved line where the people are standing on shows the bridging of the community. There is a variation of the logo with the organization’s initials listed. There are also two brand extensions to include the Pincham-Lincoln Center and the Trinity-Fort Henderson Complex. The brand identity was proposed and approved by the board in late October 2015.
  24. 24. 24 Implementation October/November 2015 The three events were the main events leading up to the completion of the signature project. The board knew partnerships with existing partners were the best way to communicate and spread the message about the grand opening. •  The black church community is a long-time supporter and partner of ALCA with direct ties to Trinity High School. Two board members attended Sweet Home Missionary Baptist Church (located behind the Trinity-Fort Henderson Complex) and offered to host a reception for the community following morning worship service. •  ALCA and the Athens Rotary Club partnered to host a Community Landscaping Day. This event allowed for more people to be exposed to the project. •  The Pincham-Lincoln Center Grand Opening was the final event for the signature project. The board expected record attendance at this event.
  25. 25. 25 Implementation November 2015 The following products were used for the Honoring Trinity School Day and the Community Landscaping Day. There was also media coverage from the Athens News Courier, the Decatur Daily, WHNT-19 News about the Community Landscaping Day. Decatur Daily (above) & Athens News Courier (below)
  26. 26. 26 Implementation November/ December 2015 The board had an opportunity to add more activities leading up to the grand opening. The purpose of those activities was for more awareness and fundraising for the signature project’s grand opening. They were no to low-cost events with very little impact to the organization. •  North Pole Stroll: The inaugural Christmas tree display located in Downtown Athens. ALCA was one of 15 trees. •  Chick-Fil-A Spirit Night: The Athens location donated to ALCA a portion of the proceeds from each meal purchased one evening. •  Initials, Inc. Party: A board member hosted a party and portion of the proceeds benefited ALCA from the sale of the bags and other gifts.
  27. 27. 27 Implementation December 2015 The lead up period to the Pincham-Lincoln Center’s Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony was a fast and furious time for the ALCA board. It was an ‘all hands on deck’ event for all board members. Each board member had certain responsibilities. Most of the tools needed for the ceremony and reception were donated or borrowed to keep the costs down. Costs were mainly for printing and decorations including a commemorative Christmas ornament to be given to all guests. The rest of the costs were associated with permanent décor of the center. The board also utilized the services of the Limestone County Sherriff Department’s trustee program to help with the manual labor to clean the interior and exterior of the community center. ALCA started its own Facebook page a week prior to the event. This was a great way to streamline the message from one channel. Within the first day, there were 100 likes to the page.
  28. 28. 28 Implementation Shareable: 398 views, 8 likes and 1 share Before and After: 1,245 views, 17 likes and 12 shares Pincham and Lincoln Name Sakes Post: 849 views, 10 likes and 3 shares Grand Opening Album: 363 views, 7 likes and 12 shares Meet Our ALCA Board Post: 1480 views, 16 likes and 1 share Facebook posts were to encourage awareness prior to the grand opening.
  29. 29. 29 Implementation The fountain was restored with monuments that were around the complex. The Long Live Trinity 16 foot mural is at the entrance of the center. It depicts the history of the school, 1865-1970. The naming plaque for Judge Pincham and Dr. Lincoln is located in the center. The brick display is where people can have their name at the center. The dignitaries cut the ribbon at the new community center, a project that had been 45 years in the making for Athens and Limestone County. A live Christmas tree was donated and commemorative ornaments were bought as giveaways for the guests.
  30. 30. 30 Implementation
  31. 31. 31 Evaluation Community Relations There were five tactics that ALCA originally outlined but then added three more totaling eight. This is an evaluation of those activities. Tactics Status Athens Rotary Club Meeting (Guest Speaker) Did not pursue Round Island Creek Missionary Baptist Association General Assembly Meeting Made an announcement to 200 people Athens-Limestone County Tourism Association Meeting Made an announcement to 150 people Honoring Trinity School Day Held a reception for nearly 100 people Community Landscaping Day -  55 people volunteered -  WHNT-19, Athens News Courier, and Decatur Daily covered the event North Pole Stroll Decorated a Christmas tree for the community event with more than 3,000 views Chick-Fil-A Spirit Night Raised less than $4.29 Initials, Inc. Party Raised $120.62
  32. 32. 32 Evaluation Media Relations There was an aggressive media relations strategy in place for all activities leading up to the grand opening. ALCA wrote the following communication products: •  Media Pitch about all ALCA activities and it included a feature story (October) •  Media Advisory for the Community Landscaping Day (November) •  Press Release for the Grand Opening (December) Each of these products were sent to nearly 50 different media outlets in the Tennessee Valley and across Alabama to give ample time to develop the story. (Links to many of these products are in the rear of this document.)
  33. 33. 33 Evaluation Media Relations WAFF-48 News , WHNT-19 News, and Athens News Courier covered the grand opening and used all of ALCA’s messages in the copy.
  34. 34. 34 Evaluation Social Media ALCA began a Facebook page on December 7th. Within the 24 hours, the page had 100 likes. By the end of 2015, the page had more than 200 likes. This page helped to focus the message and encouraged people to find ALCA. The City of Athens, Limestone County and the president of the Athens-Limestone County Tourism Association, and the Limestone County District Attorney each had posts on their Facebook pages for their friends to view the grand opening. This further showed the partnership between ALCA and these organizations. There were more than 6,000 potential views to all posts leading up to the grand opening and the photos of the opening.
  35. 35. 35 Evaluation Special Events The grand opening event had been 45 years in the making. Many people wanted to donate their time and resources to help make the event a success. The following tables will outline the costs associated for the grand opening event and for the permanent costs to the center. Table 1. Grand Opening Expenses Tactic Expense Catering Donated by the Trinity Class of 1970 Chairs Donated by Royal Funeral Home- Mason Chapel Christmas Tree Donated by Trim-A-Tree Christmas Tree Farm Commemorative Ornament $380 Decorations $179.50 PA System Borrowed from Athens Recreation Center Photography Donated by Kenneth Owens Photography Programs, Invitations, and Two Posters Printing $347.70 (Program Design was donated) Stanchions Borrowed from Athens State University Grand Total $907.20
  36. 36. 36 Evaluation Special Events Table 2. Center’s Permanent Expenses Tactic Expense ALCA Flag $150 Brick Display $800 Chairs and Tables $3,100 (Funded by a Grant) Fountain $3,200 Mural Design and Printing $926.50 Mural Glass and Installation •  $84.04 for materials •  $940.00 Naming Plaque Design and Framing Donated Signage $1,095.60 Grand Total $4,316.14
  37. 37. 37 Evaluation Overall Goal and Objectives The overall goal of the project: To restore the former Trinity High School (ALCA’s signature project) to be used a community center This goal was started in 1981 and completed on December 17, 2015. ALCA will begin renting the facility in 2016. The communication objectives: •  To increase awareness by 50% about the Trinity renovation project to the residents of Athens and Limestone County during 2014 and 2015 Limestone County has a population of 90,787 and in Athens, the population is 24,522. Because Trinity High School was the only black high school in Limestone County before integration, one could deduce that the black population were aware of the former school. In Athens, black people make up 17.5% or 4,300 people. In Limestone County, black people make up 15.33% or 13,900. So a conservative estimate would be that 9,600 black people live in the city and county. ALCA felt pretty confident that 4,000- 5,000 black people knew about Trinity and at least another 5,000-7,000 people within the county knew about Trinity and its upcoming renovation, totaling 12,000 people. To increase awareness by 50%, that would mean 6,000 more people would need to know about the project. During the two year period, ALCA’s aggressive integrated communications strategy garnered awareness from more than 6,000 people because of the strong media relationships with ten different outlets and local social media outlets as well as relationships with many other ALCA partners. •  To obtain new donors from different target audiences identified for the signature project during 2014 and 2015 The new target audiences were outlined early in 2014. ALCA received numerous donations from people who were recently made aware of the project during 2014 and 2015. During those years, $40,000 was raised and more than half of that was from new donors.
  38. 38. 38 Appendices A.  Positioning Plan B.  Board Organization Workshop Recap C.  Pincham-Lincoln Center Communications and Logistics Plan (It does include links to all of the stories published for the grand opening.) D.  Other Development and Public Relations Products
  39. 39. S Athens Limestone Community Association: Positioning for the Future Presented by Kristina Hendrix, APR
  40. 40. Overview S Where are we now? S Where do we want to go? S Who do we want to get involved? S How can we start? S Trinity Project
  41. 41. SWOT Analysis Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats Let’s look at where we are today!
  42. 42. ALCA Strengths S 501 C 3 Status S Strong Mission, Vision, and Goals S Solid Board of Directors S Built-in Audience S Available Financial Resources
  43. 43. ALCA Weaknesses S Name that doesn’t resonates with the mission S Similar Age Demographic S Small number of revenue- generating projects S Name Recognition Year Round S Small Team
  44. 44. ALCA Opportunities S  Unique mission from other non-profits S  Interesting story to share S  Reach a younger demographic S  Unite the community
  45. 45. ALCA Threats S  Other non-profits (Existing and Emerging) S  Lack of interest by community members S  Loss of financial resources
  46. 46. Fiscal Position
  47. 47. Positioning S Keep the ALCA brand visible S Expand the reach of ALCA efforts S Become the premier non-profit for the community S Be an influencer in the community
  48. 48. Current vs. Future Target Audiences Current Audiences Future Audiences Trinity HS Alumni Athens/Limestone Community Members Trinity HS Descendants Historical Groups Friends of Trinity Art Groups Black Churches Agricultural Groups Children’s Groups Women’s Groups All Churches Educational Groups (Formal and Informal) Young Adults We have to expand our target audiences to be more inclusive!
  49. 49. Getting Started S  Build a diverse coalition S  Start a social media presence S  Write opinion editorials/articles for the newspaper S  Start a signature annual fundraising event S  Have a monthly event that keeps the brand in front of people S  Start an online newsletter/publication S  Partner with other non-profits on special events and programs
  50. 50. S Athens Limestone Community Association: Positioning for the Future
  51. 51. Trinity HS Project Initial Start S Perform informal and formal research about the current state of the project S Educate people as to why it is important S Locate other cultural arts/community centers that we could emulate S Leverage existing relationships
  52. 52. Imperial Centre for the Arts and Sciences Rocky Mount, NC Arts, Science, Theater, Facility Rental, and Children’s Museum
  53. 53. Real Life Example: Imperial Centre S  City-owned/operated museum and cultural arts center; Managed by the Parks and Recreation Group S  Job Creator S  Shares the story of Rocky Mount and other cultures that interests the community S  Fiscally Strong because of ticket sales and other revenue-generating ways
  54. 54. Benefits of the Trinity HS Project S Make this an attraction for Athens S Tells the ENTIRE Athens and Limestone County Story S Keeps the Trinity story alive S Ability to tell more stories about Athens and Limestone County
  55. 55. S Athens Limestone Community Association: Positioning for the Future
  56. 56. 1 Athens-Limestone Community Center Board Retreat Recap and Actions November 11, 2014 Major Topics of Discussion • New Vision and Mission Statement • Board Roles • Communication Products • 2015 Black History Program • 2015 Calendar of Events • Revenue-Generating Streams • Actions Vision Statement- It was voted on and approved by the board. The Athens-Limestone Community Association aims to inform and engage with the public through cultural, educational, and historical activities that will honor the past and enrich the lives of current and future generations. Mission Statement- It was voted on and approved by the board. To create a connection between the history and the future of Athens and Limestone County through quality programs and stimulating activities Board Roles • President: Preside over meetings, official spokesperson, coordinate functions, and signatory authority • Vice President: Acts in the president’s absence, property/inventory administrator (Will work with the secretary to perform an annual inventory of all artifacts and exhibits bought or donated to ALCA) • Secretary: Prepare and record minutes and meeting agendas, sends minutes prior to the meeting, notifies board members of the meetings • Treasurer: Signatory authority, financial administrator, official financial document provider, Holding The Fort book shipping coordinator • Recording Secretary: Signatory authority, sends donation receipts, acts as the liaison to Trinity graduates through the class representative, acts in the secretary’s absence • Public Relations: Official spokesperson, develops all communications products, and special event planner • Project Managers: Work with the City of Athens on all building-related projects
  57. 57. 2 Communications Products • Website that will accept book sales and donations • Letterhead • Envelope • Note card/Stationery • Promotional Rack Card • Brochure • All direct mail pieces • Social Media Accounts- Facebook, Instagram, Twitter • Promotional Items 2015 Black History Program • Theme: A Century of Black Life, History and Culture (The National Black History Month Theme) • Date: Saturday, February 7, 2015 • Event time: 6pm-6:30 pm Social Hour; 6:30pm Event Begins • Potential Location: First United Methodist Church- Beasley Center, Limestone County Event Center • Potential Speaker (in order): Robert Mayberry, John Meredith, and Sonnie Hereford • Introduction of the Speaker: Rev. Louis Malone • Entrance Fee: No • Donations Encouraged: Yes • Entertainment (in order): 100 Men Choir, Committed • Refreshments: Seek a sponsor • Partnerships: Coordinate with the City of Athens, Spirit of Athens, and Limestone County to make this event the OFFICIAL Athens and Limestone County Black History Program 2014-2015 Calendar of Events • December 2014/January 2015: Small Scale Ground-Breaking Event • February 2015: Black History Month Program • April 2015: Poetry Event • June/July 2015: Trinity Community Center Ribbon Cutting Revenue-Generating Streams and Other Activities • Donations • Holding The Fort Book Sales • Black History Program • Limestone County Student Hall of Fame- Similar to the Limestone County Sports Hall of Fame but with an academic tie. This program would start in 2016. • Poetry Event • Brick Sales- Inviting people to buy bricks as a legacy that will be displayed at the Trinity Community Center
  58. 58. 3 • Memorials- Either on paper or with a plaque in the building for people who have donated to ALCA in memory of someone else Actions • All: No receipts will be sent after the book, Holding The Fort, is sold to buyers. • Rebekah Davis: Send minutes and agenda prior to the meetings, notify members of the meetings, help with the inventory (with David), and submit existing community center rental policies (with Masheldia) • Masheldia Green: Update the donor list (with Carolyn), create a list of the Trinity High School class representatives to communicate with (with Carolyn and David), submit existing community center rental policies from other centers (with Rebekah), and research legacy brick vendors so this activity can begin again and bricks can be sold. • Kristina Hendrix: Work with the City of Athens, Spirit of Athens and Limestone County to deem the Black History Program the official program for the city and county, continue with rebranding, develop a card to promote Holding The Fort as a Christmas present to others, continue to plan other special events, and work with formal and informal educators about the Center’s use • David Malone: Begin drafting an inventory plan of all exhibits and artifacts (with Rebekah) • Richard Martin: Begin research for Student Hall of Fame plan and continue to work as the project manager with the City of Athens for the Center • Carolyn Williams: Update the donor list (with Masheldia), ask Robert Mayberry to be our Black History Program speaker, ask Frank Travis of the 100 Men Choir and Committed’s representative if they will be the entertainment for the Black History program
  59. 59. Revised: October 2, 2015 Athens-Limestone Community Association Pincham-Lincoln Center Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Communications and Logistics Plan September 17, 2015 Presented by: Kristina Hendrix, APR Community and Public Relations Lead
  60. 60. 2 Overview The Athens-Limestone Community Association (ALCA) is nearing the completion of the Pincham-Lincoln Center. The plan will explain the strategies used to communicate the grand opening before, during and after and the tools need to execute the plan. Goals • To communicate and execute a ribbon cutting/grand opening for the Pincham-Lincoln Center at the Trinity – Fort Henderson Complex. • To continue to reach current and potential donors for the Trinity – Fort Henderson Complex projects. Objectives • To plan one memorable event for the opening of the Pincham-Lincoln Center for the citizens of Athens and Limestone County during November or December 2015. • To educate current and potential donors about the progress of the Trinity – Fort Henderson Complex during October 2015-January 2016. Target Audiences • Citizens of Athens and Limestone County • Tennessee Valley media outlets • Local and state government officials Key Messages • Trinity School was Limestone County’s only school for black students from 1865-1970. • Trinity School closed 45 years ago. • The location of Trinity School has been deserted since many of the activities ended in the 1980’s. • Established in 1981, the Athens-Limestone Community Association began working to renovate the former school into a community center. • After many years of fundraising and community involvement, ALCA will be opening the Pincham-Lincoln Center at the Trinity – Fort Henderson Complex. The center is named for two prominent Trinity graduates - Judge Eugene Pincham and Dr. C. Eric Lincoln who were integral to the revival of the Trinity School location. • ALCA is planning the ribbon cutting and grand opening for the Pincham- Lincoln Center is Thursday, December 17, 2015 at 10am. • The center will be used for community outreach purposes.
  61. 61. 3 Strategies • Community Relations • Media Relations/Social Media* • Special Event Planning *If the ALCA Board agrees on the overall social media strategy, information will be shared on those platforms. Tactics Community Relations Tactic Description Date Athens Rotary Club Meeting Arrange for a speaker at one of their luncheon meetings October or November 2015 Round Island Creek Missionary Baptist Association General Assembly Meeting Make an announcement and distribute progress flyers at the meeting September 25-26, 2015 Athens-Limestone Tourism Association Meeting Make an announcement and distribute progress flyers at the meeting September 29, 2015 AND another date in the future Honoring Trinity School Day Partner with Sweet Home Missionary Baptist Church for a day of worship with the classes November 1, 2015 Community Landscaping Day Partner with Rotary to plant all the trees November 21, 2015 Media Relations/Social Media Pre-Grand Opening: We will build relationships with each of these outlets to get placement in their publication or television show prior to the grand opening. The focus of these stories will be to explain the history of the project and the upcoming opening. Publication/Media Outlet Date Limestone Life Article November Source: Athens Limestone Hospital Magazine Feature Story November/December WAAY-TV Noon Show November/December
  62. 62. 4 WAFF-TV Noon Show November/December WHNT-TV Noon Show November/December Cooper and Company November/December Athens News-Courier Feature Story November AL.com (Kelly Kazek) November/December Boom! Article November/December During the Grand Opening: Publication/Media Outlet Date News Release 2 weeks before the event Media call backs to each of the outlets 3 days before the event Post-Grand Opening: Tactic Date Image Release with extended caption of the ribbon cutting Immediately following the event Special Events Planning Ribbon Cutting Agenda Location: Pincham-Lincoln Center Front Steps Date and Time: November/December 2015 10am Emcee: Kristina Hendrix, ALCA Community and Public Relations Welcome and Recognition of Special Guests…………....……..Kristina Hendrix Presentation of the Colors…………… Austin High School, COL James Walker National Anthem…………………………………………………………….Talent TBD Prayer………………..Robert Malone or Trinity Congregational Church Pastor Remarks • ALCA-Kristina Hendrix (History, Progress, and Future) • Athens City Council- Jimmy Gill, President • Limestone County Commission- Mark Yarbrough, Chairman • City of Athens- Ronnie Marks, Mayor • Alabama Department of Economic Development- Jim Byard, Director Ribbon Cutting (Individuals will be selected to cut the ribbon. There will be an approved list as well as identified standing positions.)
  63. 63. 5 Closing/Enter the Center/Reception Special Event Logistical Support The following items will be needed to successfully execute the ribbon cutting. Tactic Point of Contact Status/Due Date Catering • Light refreshments • Punch • Plates, napkins, silverware, cups, serving utensils Class of 1970; Deborah Gill and Marie McLin Chairs City of Athens Commemorative Memento Kristina Hendrix Decorations • Balloons • Flowers • Table cloths Carolyn Williams Invitation List Kristina Hendrix and Masheldia Green Invitations Kristina Hendrix PA System Edward Gilbert and Masheldia Green Parking TBD Photography TBD Podium Edward Gilbert Printed Program Kristina Hendrix, Rebekah Davis, and Charlotte Fulton Purple and Gold Ribbons Carolyn Williams Signage Kristina Hendrix Stanchions Kristina Hendrix Thank you cards Carolyn Williams, Charlotte Fulton, and Kristina Hendrix Additional items for on-going status
  64. 64. 6 • Exterior signs- Kristina is working with Athens Sign Company now. She should have new drafts for board review and approval in the coming days. • Historical Mural- Photos have been sent to Kelly Cain and she is laying out the design now. • Fort Henderson Project artist’s rendering- An email has been sent to Jeff Tosh for him to design the Fort Henderson project exterior. • Brick Project • Pincham and Lincoln Naming Plaque- Kristina and Charlotte will work together with a designer to lay this project out for approval. Budget The Athens-Limestone Community Association Board must approve all monetary requests. There will be a running tally of all requests throughout this event. Evaluation After the event, there will be a full analysis of all tactics from both a quantitative and qualitative perspective. The final results will be shared with the ALCA board in early 2016.
  65. 65. Media Report Publication/Media Outlet Date Topic WHNT-TV (CBS) June 2012 Preservation Athens News Courier May 2014 $75,000 Gift to ALCA AL.com August 2014 Holding the Fort Book Signing AthensPlus.com August 2014 Holding the Fort Book Signing Athens News Courier August 2014 Holding the Fort Book Signing WHNT-TV January 2015 Beginning Construction WAFF-TV (NBC) February 2015 2nd Annual ALCA Black History Program Athens News Courier February 2015 2nd Annual ALCA Black History Program Athens News Courier November 2015 Community Landscaping Day Decatur Daily November 2015 Community Landscaping Day WHNT-TV November 2015 Community Landscaping Day Athens News- Courier November 2015 Progress Feature Story Athens News Courier November 2015 Funding Story AthensPlus.com November 2015 Progress Feature Story WEUP 1700AM November 2015 15-minute Radio Interview WHRP 94.1FM November 2015 PSA posted The Valley Star November 2015 Progress Story WZDX-TV (FOX) December 2015 Grand Opening WAAY-TV (ABC) December 2015 Grand Opening WAFF-TV December 2015 Grand Opening WHNT-TV December 2015 Grand Opening Athens News Courier December 2015 Grand Opening The Sportsman (Tabloid Magazine) December 2015 Grand Opening WLRH-AM (Public Radio) February 2016 Grand Opening and history of Trinity
  66. 66. 606 Trinity Circle Ÿ P.O. Box 1476 Athens, AL 35612     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 45 Years in the Making: Grand Opening Planned for New Community Center in Limestone County’s Historic Only Black High School ATHENS, ALABAMA, December 3, 2015 – The Athens-Limestone Community Association will host a grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony for one of Athens and Limestone County’s oldest historical landmarks. The Pincham- Lincoln Center, the former all-black Trinity High School, will open its doors on Thursday, Dec. 17 at 10 a.m. on the Trinity – Fort Henderson Complex at 606 Trinity Circle near downtown Athens. It will be a community center for educational enrichment and job skills training for youth and adults. The school opened immediately following the American Civil War in 1865 and closed due to a desegregation court order in 1970. The plan for a community center has been 45 years in the making. Through a partnership with ALCA, City of Athens, and Limestone County and years of fundraising, the plan has become a reality. “This project has been a dream that so many of us who went to Trinity wanted completed. The community center will be a place where future generations can learn about the people who taught and went to school here at Trinity as well as learn new skills that they can carry with them throughout their lives,” said Edward Gilbert, ALCA president. “I am proud that ALCA was able to partner with Athens and Limestone County to restore this wonderful piece of history.” The City of Athens and Limestone County played a significant role in the development of the center. In 2013, the City of Athens received a Community Development Block Grant from the Alabama Department of Economics and Community Affairs to start construction of the community center. "I am proud of the efforts made by the Athens-Limestone Community Association to preserve this significant historical site and create a community center to serve our citizens," Mayor Ronnie Marks said. "Many facets of the community have - more -
  67. 67. 606 Trinity Circle Ÿ P.O. Box 1476 Athens, AL 35612 supported our efforts to enhance the Trinity-Fort Henderson site for its historical value, beautification of a blighted area and educational opportunities." Limestone County Commission Chairman Mark Yarbrough said, “The County is pleased that through this project, such an important part of Limestone County history will continue to be a part of the County’s future.” ALCA has transformed a portion of the 1959 school building that once housed the library, principal’s office, and a classroom, into a 3,600-square-foot space with a meeting room, office area, restrooms, and a kitchen. The Pincham-Lincoln Center is named for two prominent Trinity graduates, Judge R. Eugene Pincham and Dr. C. Eric Lincoln. Each of these men was integral to the revival of the school as well as benefactors for the project. Pincham died in 2008 and Lincoln in 2000. The public is invited to attend the grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony. Once the ceremony is completed, guests may enter the community center and view the pictorial mural that shows Trinity High School through its 105-year history. A reception will follow the activities. ALCA’s next major project at the Trinity – Fort Henderson Complex is the building of a memorial to Fort Henderson, the Union fort where black soldiers fought for their freedom during the American Civil War. Donations are being accepted now for the development of that memorial with plans to begin construction in 2016. The memorial will complete the construction of the three facilities at the complex – the Pincham-Lincoln Center, the Pincham Athletic Field and the Fort Henderson Memorial. Plans for future development at the complex include opening a museum and archives of Trinity School within the recently renovated former band room. - end -   Started in 1981 and reorganized in 2007, the Athens-Limestone Community Association’s mission is to create a connection between the history and the future of Athens and Limestone County through quality programs and stimulating activities. The ALCA Board President is Edward Gilbert. For media interviews, tours and photos: Kristina Hendrix, APR ALCA Community and Public Relations kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com 256-777-9414
  68. 68. Subject: MEDIA ADVISORY: ALCA and Athens Rotary Club to host Community Landscaping Day From: Kristina L. Hendrix, APR (kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com) To: kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com; Bcc: briana.harris@decaturdaily.com; jean@athensnews-courier.com; newsroom@athensnews-courier.com; hsvnews@al.com; kkazek@al.com; hsvcalendar@al.com; rebecca@athensnews-courier.com; sourceoflimestonecounty@gmail.com; teresa@athensplus.com; connie.marshall@aamu.edu; elizabeth.ragland@aamu.edu; toni.terrell@cumulus.com; jeffrey.lyons@cumulus.com; lashayb@gmail.com; r.lee@radiohuntsville.com; e.gaines@radiohuntsville.com; newsroom@waaytv.com; rkeith@waaytv.com; news@waff.com; dion.hose@whnt.com; news@whnt.com; news@rocketcitynow.com; community@rocketcitynow.com; gloria@jamiecopper.com; weuptalk@aol.com; hhollman@athensal.us; Date: Thursday, November 5, 2015 6:30 AM November 5, 2015 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ALCA and Athens Rotary Club to host Community Landscaping Day ATHENS, ALABAMA - The Athens-Limestone Community Association (ALCA) and the Athens Rotary Club are partnering for a Community Landscaping Day on Saturday, November 21 at 9 a.m. The event will be held at one of Athens’ oldest historical landmarks, the former all-black high school before integration, Trinity School, which is now called the Pincham-Lincoln Center. It is located on The Trinity-Fort Henderson Complex at 606 Trinity Circle in Athens, Ala. ALCA and Rotary are asking the community to join them for the completion of the community center’s exterior. Volunteers can be from church groups, school groups, youth, and other organizations. Athens Mayor Ronnie Marks’ Youth Commission will be one of the volunteer groups helping with the project. All volunteers should bring with them or wear work gloves, boots and water when they arrive at the community center. Earlier this year, the Athens Rotary Club donated $15,000 for the landscaping around the center. Grayson Bailey Landscaping will manage the project for the Rotary. The landscaping is the final step before the grand opening of the Pincham-Lincoln Center. The ribbon cutting ceremony will be held on Thursday, December 17 at 10 a.m. The community center will serve youth and adults with job training skills and other educational training opportunities. -end- Started in the 1981 and reorganized in 2007, the Athens-Limestone Community Association’s mission is to create a connection between the history and the future of Athens and Limestone County through quality programs and stimulating activities. Edward Gilbert is the president. For more information contact: Kristina Hendrix, APR
  69. 69. Athens-Limestone Community Association Public and Community Relations Lead kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com 256-777-9414 Attachments Volunteers Needed Landscaping Day.jpg (120.63KB)
  70. 70. Subject: FEATURE STORY: Athens-Limestone Community Association Announces Upcoming Events and Ribbon Cutting From: Kristina L. Hendrix, APR (kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com) To: kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com; Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2015 8:25 AM Good Morning, The story of the abandoned schools is one that many people often want to learn more about. Across North Alabama, the status of black schools before integration is sometimes one of destruction, disrepair or renovation. For the past eight years, the Athens-Limestone Community Association, in partnership with the City of Athens and the Limestone County Commission, has worked tirelessly to renovate Athens and Limestone County’s only all-black high school before integration, Trinity High School. The new Pincham- Lincoln Center on the Trinity - Fort Henderson Complex will be used as a community center located near downtown Athens. Leading up the December grand opening of the Pincham-Lincoln Center, ALCA will host numerous events to celebrate this momentous occasion. To prepare for the opening, ALCA would like to join you on air during a morning or noon show to share with your viewers our story of renovation and revitalization. We also will send you a feature story written by acclaimed author and ALCA board member Charlotte Fulton and a list of our upcoming events for you to place on your website and share with your viewers. There is more time to develop this story as you can join the Athens Rotary Club and us for the Community Landscaping Day on Saturday, November 21 and send a reporter to cover it. We can also arrange for you to interview ALCA board members and take pictures of the new Pincham-Lincoln Center. We will send you more information about the ribbon cutting on December 17th as we approach the date. You can contact me with your questions at the email and phone number listed below. I will follow up with you in the coming days. Here is a timeline of the Trinity – Fort Henderson Story: 1863- Fort Henderson was erected and was used as a Union fort but ultimately captured by General Nathan Bedford Forest 1865- American Civil War ended 1865- Trinity School opened on the corner of Market and Clinton Streets Late 1800’s/Early 1900’s - Market Street and Clinton Street location burns 1907-Trinity School rebuilt and moved to the Fort Henderson site 1970- Trinity School closed due to integration 1981- Athens-Limestone Community Association founded 2007- ALCA reorganized with a mission to renovate the former Trinity – Fort Henderson site 2013-ALCA awarded an Alabama Community Development Block Grant to renovate the Trinity – Fort Henderson site January 2015- Construction began December 2015- ALCA opens Pincham-Lincoln Center at the Trinity – Fort Henderson Complex Links to past ALCA progress stories:
  71. 71. Athens Working to Preserve Trinity Site, WHNT-19 News, 2012 Holding The Fort Book Sales, Al.com, 2014 100–Year Old Woman Wants To Save Trinity Site, Quadcitiesdaily.com, 2014 Contract Awarded for Trinity School Renovation, Athens News Courier, 2014 Trinity School Project Gets $75,000, Athens News Courier, 2014 Rotary Gives ALCA $15,000 for Landscaping, Athens Rotary Club, 2015 Kristina Hendrix, APR ALCA Community and Public Relations kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com 256-777-9414 Attachments Feature Story for P-L Ctr Opening.Final Draft.docx (19.01KB) Front Entrance of Trinity HS - Photo Credit Greg Cosby.jpg (143.93KB) Malone and Gill outside of Trinity- Photo Credit Greg Cosby.jpg (94.64KB) Malone inside Trinity - Photo Credit Greg Cosby.jpg (97.00KB) Big 3 Events for ALCA Nov. Dec. 2015.pdf (3.27MB) Community Landscaping Day Flyer.pdf (3.15MB) Exterior Trinity High School.jpg (511.39KB) Trinity1.pdf (1.35MB) October 14 building 1.jpg (2.86MB) October 14 building 2.jpg (2.92MB)
  72. 72. 1 David Malone stands gazing over the campus of Trinity School where he graduated in 1966, seeing only in his mind’s eye the faces of the students who became his extended family and the teachers who molded his intellect and his character. The school that had been the heart of African-American life and culture in Athens closed its doors in 1970, but Malone remembers it in minute detail. He knew the school environs intimately well before he arrived at school age, standing in his grandmother’s yard across Brownsferry Street and watching his older cousins come and go: to ball practice, to classes, to dances and films and graduation programs. Here is where the earthworks of the old fort field encircled the school, Malone recalls; here, where Coach H.B. Provience ran athletes up and down the red clay embankments, toughening them for the coming football season. Here is the koi pond, a source of awe among students who paused there to admire its beauty; on this spot, the monument to Mary Emma Perkins, the white teacher who lived among Trinity’s black families from 1889 until her death in 1943, when by her own request she was cremated and her ashes scattered on the grounds of her beloved Trinity. Over there is the bridge designed in 1930 by senior Will Alyce Mason as a gift from her class. And here once stood the stately home where the principal and out-of-state teachers lived in a cooperative arrangement, taking turns at chores in the kitchen. These steps and this landing were part of the auditorium built in 1929, an addition to the majestic two-story brick structure built in 1914 to replace a similar building that burned the previous year, and replaced, in turn, in 1959 by a more modest one-story structure after Trinity School passed from the nurturing hands of the American Missionary Association into the public school system. That building remained in use until schools desegregated in 1970 and Trinity students were scattered in a diaspora among the formerly all-white schools of Athens and Limestone County. There is silence today at that spot on Coleman Hill, but not for long. A century and a half after Mary Fletcher Wells took on the task of educating Athens’ freedmen, and 45 years after Trinity’s last graduates marched across the stage to receive their diplomas, the campus will come to life again when the Pincham-Lincoln Center opens later this year. The renovation – a partnership between the City of Athens, Limestone County, and Athens-Limestone Community Association – has transformed a portion of the 1959 school building that once housed the library, principal’s office, and a classroom, into a 3,600-square-foot space with meeting room, office area, restrooms, and a kitchen. The space will be used primarily for educational programs such as after-school mentoring. Plans also call for the meeting room and grounds to be available on a rental basis for public and private events. Located on the north side of Brownsferry Street at 606 Trinity Circle in the Trinity-Fort Henderson Complex, the Pincham-Lincoln Center sits on one of the most historically significant sites in the state. Relocated to Coleman Hill after a 1907 fire that destroyed the school in its downtown location, Trinity School stood within the embankments of a Union fort built in 1863 in part by former slaves-turned- soldiers, some of whose descendants would later become scholars on the very ground where they once fought for freedom. A portion of the embankment is still visible on the east side of the campus. For more than a century Limestone County’s only high school for African Americans, Trinity came into existence in May of 1865, just weeks after the end of the Civil War, when Mary Fletcher Wells, a white schoolteacher from Ann Arbor, Michigan, assembled her first classes in the white Baptist church, where she initially taught under military guard. Trinity soon moved to an old house where it would remain until 1882, despite the building’s state of extreme disrepair. In the intervening years, Wells would organize Trinity Congregational Church (in 1871); chaperone the Fisk Jubilee Singers on their first state-side tour (also in 1871); oversee the construction of a church building (in 1876) and a brick school building (in 1882); and nurture the minds and souls of such talented students as Patti Malone and Alice Vassar, both of them Fisk Jubilee Singers; George Ruffin Bridgeforth, who later taught at Tuskegee Institute under the direction of Booker T. Washington and alongside George Washington Carver; Alexander Collier and Noah Franklin Turner, physicians near the turn of the Feature Story Leading up to the Pincham-Lincoln Center Grand Opening
  73. 73. 2 century; and dozens of teachers and preachers who staffed Limestone County’s rural African-American schools and filled its pulpits. That history of distinction continued throughout Trinity’s 105-year history, with Trinity graduates excelling in many fields of endeavor: education, music, law, theology, the military, art, medicine… The Pincham-Lincoln Center bears the name of two such Trinity students and benefactors, both of them graduates of the early 1940s. Charles Eric Lincoln was an author, scholar and theologian who wrote 22 books, taught or lectured in prominent universities at home and abroad, and retired from the faculty of Duke University. Robert Eugene Pincham was a justice on the appellate court of Illinois. One of the primary goals in the Trinity renovation project is the preservation of the history of the school and its people – a history which parallels that of other black schools established all across the South by philanthropic and religious groups in the years following the Civil War. Like Trinity, those schools played a key role in the education of the African-American population, but their stories are quickly being obscured with the deterioration, demolition, or diversion of the building for other purposes. In Huntsville, Councill High School continues to deteriorate while an alumni group struggles to raise funds to restore the school named for William Hooper Councill, first president of Alabama A&M. Councill Training School, Councill High’s counterpart in the Madison County School System, is now in use by Alabama A&M. Like many of the state’s historically all-black schools, their history is tied to that of Trinity. Mary Fletcher Wells and W.H. Councill were contemporaries, and he often led teachers’ institutes for her faculty. West of Athens in Florence, a brick marker memorializes Burrell Normal School, relocated to Florence by the American Missionary Association in 1903, after its school of the same name burned in Selma. Among Burrell’s early teachers were Trinity graduate Inez Higgins, and Lucile LaCour, the daughter of former Trinity student and Fisk Jubilee Singer Alice Vassar LaCour. Burrell Normal was transferred to Florence City Schools in 1937 and renamed Burrell High School. In 1951 it moved and combined with Slater Elementary School, becoming Burrell-Slater, one of Trinity’s top rivals in sports. Burrell-Slater burned in 1958, was rebuilt in 1960, and closed when Alabama’s public schools were desegregated. In neighboring Sheffield, a street renamed Sterling Boulevard evokes the memory of Sheffield Colored School, established in 1889 and renamed in 1942 for Benjamin Sterling, a former slave who was professor there from 1896 to 1936, many of those years as principal. That school was razed in 1978. South of Athens in Decatur, Leon Sheffield Magnet School bears the name of the Trinity graduate who was principal for 19 years as the school morphed from Decatur Negro High School to Lakeside High School to Lakeview Elementary to Leon Sheffield Magnet School. The effort to preserve the site of Trinity School and Fort Henderson dates back to 1981, when an alumni group formed Athens-Limestone Community Association and purchased the school, which had begun to deteriorate through disuse. The building enjoyed a short period of rejuvenation as a community center and the site of a few businesses. The effort eventually stalled when the cost of operations and maintenance became prohibitive. The project was approached with renewed vigor in 2007 with ALCA’s reorganization. Construction, funded primarily by a grant from the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, began in January of this year. Funding has also come from city, county and state government, local civic groups, and Trinity alumni. The grounds are currently being landscaped with a $15,000 gift from Athens Rotary Club. In addition to the renovation, ALCA has published Holding the Fort, a book of Trinity’s history written by Charlotte Fulton, and has sponsored events for Black History Month and a wildly popular production of the black gospel Crowns. Upcoming events include a Honoring Trinity School Day on Nov. 1st at Sweet Home Missionary Baptist Church at the 11 a.m. worship service with a reception to follow; a Community Landscaping Day on Nov. 21st , when ALCA and Athens Rotary Club invite volunteers of all ages to help plant trees and complete the landscaping; a grand opening and ribbon-cutting for the Pincham-Lincoln
  74. 74. 3 Center planned for Dec. 17th; and productions of Arise and Build, a musical play based on the history of Trinity School. Produced and directed by the multi-talented Frank Travis, Arise and Build will be presented in early February at McCandless Hall on the campus of Athens State University. Also in progress is a series of videotaped interviews with some of Trinity’s graduates.
  75. 75. Kristina Hendrix, APR Athens Limestone Community Association Public and Community Relations Lead kristinalhendrix@yahoo.com May 23, 2014 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ALCA Receives $75,000 for Trinity School Restoration Project ATHENS, ALABAMA - The State of Alabama, Limestone County and the City of Athens donated a collective $75,000, $25,000 each, to the Athens-Limestone Community Association (ALCA) to assist in the restoration of the re-opening the old Trinity School building as a community center. City, county, and state officials were on hand to present the monetary donations to the ALCA board members. Athens Mayor Ronnie Marks said, “ The city council and I support not only the historical value of this project, but the value it will add to our community and to all of Limestone County. It's important to retain the history of where we came from. This was a Civil War fort and the first black school in Limestone County, operating until it closed in 1970. When we start losing our past, and not passing it on to young people, then we lose our history, so it's important to help preserve it. This will also be great for local tourism.” Limestone County Commission Chairman Stanley Menefee added “This is a very worthwhile project, and we appreciate the efforts that have been made in this project already. Trinity has so much history that should be preserved, taken care of and acknowledged, and we're proud to be a part of it.” “The reason I like this thing is because of the historical interest, first of all, but also this is something that has been an eyesore for years, and getting it cleaned up will improve the look and the reputation of the community. It's like Lincoln-Bridgeforth Park, which is now an asset, and this is something historical that will bring good things to the city and the community, “ said Alabama State Representative Dan Williams. -more-
  76. 76. The ALCA Board President Edward Gilbert accepted the donations on behalf of the organization. “We appreciate the support that's coming from everyone, and of course we need continued support to maintain the project, so we are open for volunteers. This support today helps show that we have a worthwhile program.” Additional fundraising efforts are helping to ensure the project progresses. The ALCA, in conjunction with various other groups, have worked to demolish certain areas of the school to prepare for the new construction. They have recently replaced the roof on the old band room. Construction will begin soon on the new community center. -end- Started in the 1970’s, the Athens Limestone Community Association’s mission is to create a historical reflection of the Browns Ferry Street site whose ties to the antebellum times, Civil War at Fort Henderson (“The Fort”) which included many African-American soldiers from this area serving in the U.S. Army, the American Missionary School for freed slaves which later became known as Trinity High School – all providing a significant impact to Athens, Alabama and abroad. The ALCA Board President is Edward Gilbert. Pictured from left: Seated are Alabama Rep. Dan Williams, Limestone County Commission Chairman Stanley Menefee, and Athens Mayor Ronnie Marks; standing, ALCA board members Ronnie Smith, Richard Martin, Carolyn Williams, Charlotte Fulton, Rebekah Davis and Edward Gilbert. ALCA board members also include Masheldia Green, David Malone and Jimmy Woodroof.

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