Common Core Presentation

2,833 views

Published on

This Common Core presentation is one that I used at forums, meetings, and other sessions on the East Coast this year. I'm sharing with the hopes that others may use it to educate people in their communities.

There are NOTES on many of these slides. They are included in the tabs down below in the comments section. Use these to help guide you through the slides.

Schedule a meeting or house party. Let's get people motivated to act!

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Common Core Presentation

  1. 1. The Common Core State Standards Gambling With Our Future
  2. 2. What is the Common Core State Standards Initiative?
  3. 3. The CCSSI Mission Statement: "The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy." -corestandards.org
  4. 4. Why were the standards made? "Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people with a highquality education. It should be clear to every student, parent, and teacher what the standards of success are in every school." - corestandards.org
  5. 5. The CCSS motto: "...fewer, deeper, higher..."
  6. 6. Here are the math standards in Kindergarten...
  7. 7. Know number names and the count sequence. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.1 Count to 100 by ones and by tens. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.2 Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1). CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.A.3 Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects). Count to tell the number of objects. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4a When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4b Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.4c Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.B.5 Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1– 20, count out that many objects. Compare numbers. CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.C.6 Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies.1 CCSS.Math.Content.K.CC.C.7 Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
  8. 8. Understand addition, and understand subtraction. CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.1 Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings1, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations. CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.2 Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem. CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.3 Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1). CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.4 For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation. CCSS.Math.Content.K.OA.A.5 Fluently add and subtract within 5. Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value. CCSS.Math.Content.K.NBT.A.1 Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (such as 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones. Describe and compare measurable attributes. CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.A.1 Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object. CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.A.2 Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter. Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category. CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.B.3 Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.1
  9. 9. Identify and describe shapes. CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.1 Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to. CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.2 Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size. CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.A.3 Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three-dimensional (“solid”). Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes. CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.4 Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length). CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.5 Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes. CCSS.Math.Content.K.G.B.6 Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, “Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?”
  10. 10. Now, here are the ELA standards for Kindergarten:
  11. 11. READING: LITERATURE Key Ideas and Details CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. Craft and Structure CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.4 Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.5 Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.6 With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.7 With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts). (RL.K.8 not applicable to literature) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.9 With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.10 Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
  12. 12. READING: INFORMATIONAL TEXT Key Ideas and Details CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.2 With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.3 With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. Craft and Structure CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.4 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.5 Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.6 Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.7 With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.8 With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.9 With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures). Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.10 Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1 Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1a Follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1b Recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by specific sequences of letters. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1c Understand that words are separated by spaces in print. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.1d Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet.
  13. 13. READING: FOUNDATIONAL CONCEPTS Phonological Awareness CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2 Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2a Recognize and produce rhyming words. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2b Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2c Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2d Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.1 (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.2e Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words. Phonics and Word Recognition CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3a Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary sound or many of the most frequent sounds for each consonant. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3b Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to,you, she, my, is, are, do, does). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3d Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ. Fluency CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.4 Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.
  14. 14. WRITING Text Types and Purposes CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.1 Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.2 Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.3 Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened. Production and Distribution of Writing (W.K.4 begins in grade 3) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.5 With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.6 With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. Research to Build and Present Knowledge CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.7 Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of books by a favorite author and express opinions about them). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.K.8 With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  15. 15. LISTENING and SPEAKING Comprehension and Collaboration CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners aboutkindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.1a Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.1b Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.2 Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.3 Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.4 Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.5 Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.6 Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.
  16. 16. LANGUAGE Conventions of Standard English CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.1a Print many upper- and lowercase letters. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.1b Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.1c Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.1d Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.1e Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.1f Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2a Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2b Recognize and name end punctuation. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2c Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2d Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships. Knowledge of Language (L.K.3 begins in grade 2) Vocabulary Acquisition and Use CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on kindergarten reading and content. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.4a Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately (e.g., knowing duck is a bird and learning the verb to duck). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.4b Use the most frequently occurring inflections and affixes (e.g., -ed, -s, re-, un-, pre-, -ful, -less) as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5 With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5a Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5b Demonstrate understanding of frequently occurring verbs and adjectives by relating them to their opposites (antonyms). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5c Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at school that are colorful). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5d Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same general action (e.g., walk, march, strut, prance) by acting out the meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.6 Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.
  17. 17. Deeper CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.4b Use the most frequently occurring inflections and affixes (e.g., -ed, -s, re-, un-, pre-, -ful, -less) as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word
  18. 18. Higher CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  19. 19. Talking Points
  20. 20. Talking Points
  21. 21. Talking Points
  22. 22. My Talking Points • Content standards are static; the world is not • CCSS designed so that all students learn the • • same things (backwards mapped) CCSS kill innovation – emphasis on preset knowledge for preset future CCSS were designed to be tested o Test scores used for profits from materials/programs o Tracking students and schools • CCSS are developmentally inappropriate • Too much control in the hands of a few
  23. 23. A Little Bit of [recent] CCSS History
  24. 24. Some messages that came with it... • • • • our students are not internationally competitive in math and reading and science we don't have enough STEM college grads our dropout rate is too high our students aren't prepared with the basic skills needed to start college or entry-level careers Common Core State Standards is the answer to our needs for success!
  25. 25. Our students are not internationally competitive in math and reading and science Pearson Chief Ed Advisor says these countries put teachers in high status and have a “culture of education.”
  26. 26. Our students are not internationally competitive in math and reading and science Reading: U.S. had average score of 500 which put us, statistically, in 7th place.
  27. 27. Our students are not internationally competitive in math and reading and science Science: U.S. had average score of 502 which put us, statistically, in 13th place.
  28. 28. Our students are not internationally competitive in math and reading and science Math: U.S. had average score of 487 which put us, statistically, in 18th place. Source: PISA 2009 Results http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pisa/pisa2009highlights.asp
  29. 29. Our students are not internationally competitive in math and reading and science If you remove other variables, like poverty: U.S. would be, statistically, in about th 8 place. Source: Stanford Report http://news.stanford.edu/news/2013/january/test-scores-ranking-011513.html
  30. 30. We don’t have enough STEM college graduates Almost one-half of our current STEM graduates don’t work in a STEM-related field. This includes computer scientists and engineers. We’re told it’s because our graduates aren’t qualified, and talent must come from outside the country. Source: Washington Post http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-04-26/business/38828223_1_stemfields-foreign-workers-senate-immigration-bill
  31. 31. We don’t have enough STEM college graduates Bill Gates leads the charge on getting more students graduating from U.S. high schools ready to code and develop software. These are relatively high-paying jobs for American grads. We use foreign talent because it’s cheap. Americans aren’t cheap…unless we could somehow flood the job market with coders and developers.
  32. 32. We don’t have enough STEM college graduates In other words, if we can build a huge talent pool of low-level coders and developers and engineers, we don’t have to pay them as much. This isn’t STEM education – it’s “targeted” STEM. Bottom line: There is no STEM crisis.
  33. 33. Our dropout rates are too high From 1990 to 2010, dropout rates for all subgroups have fallen – across the board They are still too high, but… Source: National Center for Education Statistics
  34. 34. Our high school graduates aren’t “college and career ready” Two very big problems with this claim: 1. No one has offered a verifiable definition of what “college and career ready” actually looks like. 2. Without a definition, this statement becomes totally meaningless.
  35. 35. High-Stakes Testing • 2010: Common Core was unanimously adopted in • • • • • most states State ed departments began a strong campaign to foster support Testing on CCSS by 2014-15 year Ed Commish in NY warned of lower performance (maybe 30% lower) on “more difficult tests” Teacher evaluation relies on results Other than mean things that districts may do, there is no student benefit or harm
  36. 36. Source: FAQ http://www.corestandards.org
  37. 37. What is this doing to our schools?
  38. 38. What is this doing to our schools?
  39. 39. What is this doing to our schools?
  40. 40. What is this doing to our kids?
  41. 41. What is this doing to our kids?
  42. 42. What is this doing to our teachers?
  43. 43. What is this leading to?
  44. 44. What is this leading to? Talent meritocracy Exam meritocracy
  45. 45. Data Mining
  46. 46. So, what do we do? Pressure Legislators SPEAK UP!

×