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ORGANIZATION CULTURE OF
A project submitted for the partial fulfillment for
internal assessment in the subject
Management ...
INTRODUCTION
Organizational culture has a strong impact on organization and
management, which emerges from its nature and ...
Googlised
Google (NASDAQ: GOOG)is one of the best-known and most admired companies
around the world, so much so that “goog...
and always putting it before making more money in the short term seems to have
been critical to their success.
Keeping the...
for Google is to expand to new fields outside of their Web search engine business.
To promote new ideas, Google encourages...
employee whose defection from Microsoft was the target of a lawsuit, did not get
his own office and shared a cubicle with ...
Googler’s checklist
1.Focus on the user and all else will follow.
2.it’s bestto do one thing really, really well.
3.fast i...
ANALYSIS
A number of researchers have conducted a review of the concept of organizational
culture. Walter R. Freytag defin...
Freytag focuses onthe assumptions and values that are consciouslyorunconsciously
cohesion that binds an organization. Assu...
by the members of the organization. Organizational culture can act as a conduit of a
solution to the problem of organizati...
and for the good of the company and for the good of the world, which is tied to our
overall mission of making information ...
 Social groups of all kinds, such as meditation classes, film clubs, wine tasting
groups, and salsa dance clubs.
 Health...
1. Cultural Power (Power Culture). A source of strength that highlight core control.
there are few rules orprocedures and ...
problems, no matter how many. Our offices and cafes is designed to encourage
interaction between Google employee in the te...
CONCLUSION
Google created a unique work environment that attracts, motivates, and retains the
best players in the field. G...
Larissa A. Grunig, James E. Grunig, David M. Dozier, Excellent Public Relations
and Effective Organizations: A Study of Co...
Organization culture of google
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Organization culture of google

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ORGANIZATION CULTURE OF GOOGLE

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Organization culture of google

  1. 1. ORGANIZATION CULTURE OF A project submitted for the partial fulfillment for internal assessment in the subject Management Process & Organizational Behavior (MASTERS OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION) Semester - First Name of student SakshiTiwari(mba gen) Name of teacher Dr.Gazala Y.Ashraf. AmityBusinessSchool AmityUniversity,Chhattisgarh Dated: 14th December2015
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION Organizational culture has a strong impact on organization and management, which emerges from its nature and its content. Organizational culture is defined as a system of assumptions, values, norms, and attitudes, manifested through symbols which the members of an organization have developed and adopted through mutual experience and which help them determine the meaning of the world around them and how to behave in it. Assumptions, values, norms, and attitudes that the members of an organization share significantly shape their interpretative schemes. Through interpretative schemes the members of an organization assign meanings to occurrences within and outside the organization and understand the reality that surrounds them (Fiske, 1991). The behaviour, actions, and interactions of the members of an organization emerge from the meaning that the reality of that organization has for them. Organizational culture is a form of collective interpretative scheme shared by the members of an organization, due to which they assign meanings to occurrences, people, and events within and outside of the organization in a similar way and treat them similarly (Schein, 2004). Google is one of the few companies that successfully combine technological innovation with a strong organizational culture.
  3. 3. Googlised Google (NASDAQ: GOOG)is one of the best-known and most admired companies around the world, so much so that “googling” is the term many use to refer to searching information on the Web. What started out as a student project by two Stanford University graduates—Larry Page and Sergey Brin—in 1996, Google became the most frequently used Web search engine on the Internet with 1 billion searches per day in 2009, as well as other innovative applications such as Gmail, Google Earth, Google Maps, and Picasa. Google grew from 10 employees working in a garage in Palo Alto to 10,000 employees operating around the world by 2009. What is the formula behind this success? Google strives to operate based on solid principles that may be traced back to its founders. In a world crowded with search engines, they were probably the first company that put users first. Their mission statement summarizes their commitment to end-user needs: “To organize the world’s information and to make it universally accessible and useful.” While other companies were focused onmarketing their sites and increasing advertising revenues, Google stripped the search page of all distractions and presented users with a blank page consisting only ofa companylogo and a search box. Google resisted pop-up advertising, because the company felt that it was annoying to end-users. They insisted that all their advertisements would be clearly marked as “sponsored links.” This emphasis on improving user experience
  4. 4. and always putting it before making more money in the short term seems to have been critical to their success. Keeping their employees happy is also a value they take to heart. Google created a unique work environment that attracts, motivates, and retains the best players in the field. Google was ranked as the number 1 “Best Place to Work For” by Fortune magazine in 2007 and number 4 in 2010. This is not surprising if one looks closer to how Google treats employees. On their Mountain View, California, campus called the “Googleplex,” employees are treated to free gourmet food options including sushi bars and espresso stations. In fact, many employees complain that once they started working for Google, they tend to gain 10 to 15 pounds! Employees have access to gyms, shower facilities, video games, on-site child care, and doctors. Google provides 4 months of paternal leave with 75% of full pay and offers $500 for take-out meals for families with a newborn. These perks create a place where employees feel that they are treated well and their needs are taken care of. Moreover, they contribute to the feeling that they are working at a unique and coolplace that is different from everywhere else they may have worked. In addition, Google encourages employee risk taking and innovation. How is this done? When a vice president in charge of the company’s advertising system made a mistake costing the company millions of dollars and apologized for the mistake, she was commended by Larry Page, who congratulated her for making the mistake and noting that he would rather run a companywhere they are moving quickly and doing too much, as opposed to being too cautious and doing too little. This attitude toward acting fast and accepting the cost of resulting mistakes as a natural consequence of working on the cutting edge may explain why the company is performing much ahead of competitors such as Microsoft and Yahoo! One of the current challenges
  5. 5. for Google is to expand to new fields outside of their Web search engine business. To promote new ideas, Google encourages all engineers to spend 20% of their time working on their own ideas. Google’s culture is reflected in their decision making as well. Decisions at Google are made in teams. Even the company management is in the hands of a triad: Larry Page and Sergey Brin hired Eric Schmidt to act as the CEO of the company, and they are reportedly leading the company by consensus. In other words, this is not a company where decisions are made by the senior person in charge and then implemented top down. It is commonfor several small teams to attack each problem and for employees to try to influence each other using rational persuasion and data. Gut feeling has little impact on how decisions are made. In some meetings, people reportedly are not allowed to say “I think…” but instead must say “the data suggest….” To facilitate teamwork, employees work in open office environments where private offices are assigned only to a select few. Even Kai-Fu Lee, the famous
  6. 6. employee whose defection from Microsoft was the target of a lawsuit, did not get his own office and shared a cubicle with two other employees. How do they maintain these unique values? In a company emphasizing hiring the smartest people, it is very likely that they will attract big egos that may be difficult to work with. Google realizes that its strength comes from its “small company” values that emphasize risk taking, agility, and cooperation. Therefore, they take their hiring process very seriously. Hiring is extremely competitive and getting to work at Google is not unlike applying to a college. Candidates may be asked to write essays about how they will perform their future jobs. Recently, they targeted potential new employees using billboards featuring brain teasers directing potential candidates to a Web site where they were subjected to more brain teasers. Each candidate may be interviewed by as many as eight people on several occasions. Through this scrutiny, they are trying to select “Googley” employees who will share the company’s values, perform at high levels, and beliked by others within the company. Will this culture survive in the long run? It may be too early to tell, given that the company was only founded in 1998. The founders emphasized that their initial public offering (IPO) would not change their culture and they would not introduce more rules orchange the way things are donein Google to please Wall Street.
  7. 7. Googler’s checklist 1.Focus on the user and all else will follow. 2.it’s bestto do one thing really, really well. 3.fast is better than slow. 4.democracy on the web works. 5.You don’tneed to be at your desk to need an answer. 6.You can make money without doing evil. 7.There’s always more information out there. 8.The need for information crosses all borders. 9.You can be serious without a suit. 10.Great just isn’t good enough.
  8. 8. ANALYSIS A number of researchers have conducted a review of the concept of organizational culture. Walter R. Freytag define the culture of the organization as: “a distinct and shared set of conscious and unconscious assumptions and values that binds organizational members together and prescribes appropriate patterns of behavior.”
  9. 9. Freytag focuses onthe assumptions and values that are consciouslyorunconsciously cohesion that binds an organization. Assumptions and values that determine the behavior patterns of members in the organization. Other researchers such as Larissa A. Grunig, et al, define organizational culture as “the sum total of shared values, symbols, meaning, beliefs, assumption, and expectations that organize and integrate a group of people who work together.” Definition Grunig et.al. This is similar to the one previously submitted Freytag, namely that organizational culture is the totality of values, symbols, meanings, assumptions, and expectations are able to organize a group of people working together. Another definition, and this is the definition ofa pioneering theory oforganizational culture, proposed bythe Edgar H. Schein. Schein states as organizational culture as focuses on the assumptions and values that are consciously or unconsciously cohesion that binds an organization. Assumptions and values that determine the behavior patterns of members in the organization. Other researchers such as Larissa A. Grunig, et al, define organizational culture as “.... a pattern of shared basic assumption that was learned by a group as it solved its problems of external adaptation and internal integration, that has worked well enough to be considered valid and, therefore, to be taught to new member as the correct way to perceive, think, and feel in relation to those problem.” Schein states that organizational culture is a pattern of basic assumptions that are valid and work within the organization. A series of basic assumptions can bestudied
  10. 10. by the members of the organization. Organizational culture can act as a conduit of a solution to the problem of organization, acts as an adapter to factors outside the organization that developed, as well as in conducting internal integration of its members. A more detailed definition ofthe organizational culture given byMatt Alvesson, that when talking about the culture of the organization, then “seems to mean talking about the importance for people of symbolism – of rituals, myths, stories and legends – and about the interpretation of events, ideas, and experiences that are influenced and shaped by the groups within they live. I will also, however, take organizational culture to include values and assumptions about social reality ...” Synthesis of this understanding is the organizational culture is the totality of values, symbols, meanings, assumptions, and expectations that can provide solutions for factors outside the organization that developed and able to be the glue for its members. Google also maintains its organizational culture onthe simple terms of futuristic and selfless thought which is to be shared and followed, as rightly put across by one of its founders Sergey Brin say that he actually doesn’t think keeping the culture is a goal. I think improving the culture is. Furthermore, as described by Google’s Chief culture officer Stacy Savides Sullivan that he would characterize the culture as one that is team-oriented, very collaborative and encouraging people to think non- traditionally, different from where they ever worked before–working with integrity
  11. 11. and for the good of the company and for the good of the world, which is tied to our overall mission of making information accessible to the world” (Following the strategies of the global market Google understands that the organizational culture should be modified with accordanceto the national culture making it one among the best in the industry. Which increasing globalization, performance and values of the employees aligned with the company’s strategy and manipulate culture to achieve the organizational objective according to (Ogbonna and Harris, 2002). Organizationally, Google maintains a casual and democratic atmosphere, resulting in its distinction as a “Flat” company. The company does not boast a large middle management, and upper management is so hands on, it’s hard to qualify them in a separate category. Teams are made up ofmembers with equal authority and a certain level of autonomy is maintained. This techno-democracytakes a good deal of effort to maintain. In order to secure it, a sort of bread and circuses environment is created. Google boasts some unique cultural aspects:  Local touches like ski gondolas in Zurich, expressing each office's unique location and personality.  Dogs, lava lamps, and massage chairs.  Double rooms (few single offices!) with three or four team members.  Foosball, darts, assorted video games, pianos, ping pong tables, lap pools, gyms that include yoga and dance classes.
  12. 12.  Social groups of all kinds, such as meditation classes, film clubs, wine tasting groups, and salsa dance clubs.  Health food at a wide variety of cafés, and outdoor seating for sunshine brainstorming.  Snacks and drinks to keep Googlers going throughout the day. The Google culture is probably one of the most positive, influential, all- encompassing, productivity-inducing environments the world has ever seen. This sorthigh praise is typical from industry experts, and there is no shortageof emulation recommendation in industry magazines. Etzioni typology oforganization are filed: (1) Coercive Organizations; (2) Utilitarian Organizations; and (3) Normative Organization. Coercive organization is an organization whosemembers are trapped in physical and economic reasons that have to abide by any regulations imposed by the authorities. Utilitarian organization is an organization in which the members may be possibleto work for a just and fair result is also a tendency to adhere to some rules are essential in addition to the workers preparing the norms and rules that protectthemselves. Normative Organization is an organization in which the individual contributed to the commitment because it considers the organization is the same as the goals themselves. Based on the typology proposed by Etizoni organization, then Google including normative organization because all members of the organization have the same vision with Google, which is trying to promote innovation and passion to advance the organization become a leader in the world of dot-com. While the type of corporate culture by Cameron and Quinn, Handy such as:
  13. 13. 1. Cultural Power (Power Culture). A source of strength that highlight core control. there are few rules orprocedures and competitive atmosphere, oriented on the power, and politically. 2. Cultural Role (Role Culture). Work is controlled by the procedures and regulations. Role or job description is more important than the people who fill these positions. 3. Cultural Support (Support Culture). The goal is to bring together the right people and let them do the job. Its influence is based more on the strength of the expert rather than personal strength or position. 4. Cultural People (People Culture). The individual is the main point; the company is only there to serve individuals in the company. Based on these types, then the prevailing corporate culture at Google is People Culture. This is stated in the statement of Larry Page as CEO of Google, which recognizes that: "The people behind the scene which makes Google the companyit is today. We hire people who are smart and diligent, and we prefer the ability over experience. Although Google employees share the same goals and vision for the company, we accept all people from different backgrounds and with a diversity of languages, reflecting the global users we serve. Outside of work, Google employees perform a variety of hobbies, ranging from cycling tobeekeeping, from playing frisbeeto dance the foxtrot. We try to maintain an open culture that is often associated with the company longer, which is where everyone is an active contributor and feel comfortable to share ideas and opinions. In our weekly mandatory meetings ("TGIF")-not including those via email or in the Cafe-Google employees to ask questions directly to Larry, Sergey, and other executives about the company's
  14. 14. problems, no matter how many. Our offices and cafes is designed to encourage interaction between Google employee in the team and other intergroup, as well as to turn the conversation about work and play. Google's culture is very informal. Googlers working in groups in a very dense, with three orfour staff to share spacewith couches and dogs. Corporatevirtually invisible hierarchy and employees who do not wear uniforms. Google India Company Overview Google IndiaPrivate Limitedoperatesasanonline searchengine.The companyprovidesaccessto online information. Italsoservesasa platformforusersto use as vehiclesforsocial networking,video engagement,mailingandblogging.The companywasfoundedin2004 and isbasedin Bengaluru,India. Google IndiaPrivate Limitedoperatesasasubsidiaryof Google Inc. No.3, RMZ Infinity - TowerE OldMadras Road 3rd, 4th, and 5th Floors Bengaluru, 560 016 India Foundedin 2003 Phone: 91 80 6721 8989 Key ExecutivesForGoogle India Private Limited Mr. Sridhar Seshadri BusinessHeadof Financial Services
  15. 15. CONCLUSION Google created a unique work environment that attracts, motivates, and retains the best players in the field. Google encourages employee risk taking and innovation. Google’s culture is reflected in their decision making as well. Decisions at Google are made in teams. Even the company management is in the hands of a triad: Larry Page and Sergey Brin hired Eric Schmidt to act as the CEO of the company, and they are reportedly leading the company by consensus. Synthesis of understanding organizational culture is the totality of values, symbols, meanings, assumptions, and expectations that can provide solutions to the growing factors outside the organization and able to be the glue for its members. Based on the typology proposed by Etizoni organization, then Google including normative organization because all members of the organization have the same vision with Google, which is trying to promote innovation and passion to advance the organization become a leader in the world of dot-com. While the type of corporate culture by Cameron and Quinn, Handy the prevailing corporateculture at Google is People Culture. REFERENCES Case Study Google.pdf Edgar H. Schein, Organizational Culture and Leadership, 3rd Edition (San Fransisco: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2004) p.17. Fiske, S.T., Taylor, S.E., (1991). Social cognition. New York: McGraw hill.
  16. 16. Larissa A. Grunig, James E. Grunig, David M. Dozier, Excellent Public Relations and Effective Organizations: A Study of Communication Management in Three Countries (New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Publishers, 2002) p.282. Mats Alvesson, Understanding Organizational Culture (London: SAGE Publications Ltd., 2002) p.3. Schein E. (2004). Organizational culture and leadership. TousandOaks: Sage publications.

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