Graduate Employability Slides Durham Uni 200110

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Presentation in previous role as CIHE Deputy CEO to academic staff at Durham University about graduate employability skills, employer needs and preparing students for a global economy.

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Graduate Employability Slides Durham Uni 200110

  1. 1. Graduate Employability: what do employers think and want? Keith Herrmann Deputy Chief Executive The Council for Industry and Higher Education
  2. 2. Council for Industry and Higher Education A strategic leadership network for higher education and business Accenture • Anglo American plc • AstraZeneca plc • BAE Systems plc • BG Group • BP International plc • British Council • BT plc • Centrica plc • City & Guilds • CITB-Construction Skills • Committee of University Chairmen • EADS Innovation Works • Financial Times Group • Guild HE • Higher Education Funding Council for England • HSBC Bank plc • i-graduate • Imperial College • Kaplan International Ltd • Keele University • Kingston University • KPMG LLP • Legal & General • Logica plc • London School of Economics • London South Bank University • Loughborough University • McKinsey & Company • Microsoft Limited • McGraw Hill Companies • National Grid plc • New College Durham • Open University • Oracle Corporation UK Ltd • Pfizer UK• PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP • Quality & Curriculum Authority • Royal Bank of Scotland plc • Scottish Power plc • Shell International Ltd • Spencer Stuart • Standard Chartered Bank • The Sutton Trust • Tesco plc • United Utilities • University of Abertay Dundee • University of Bristol • University of Cambridge • University of Glasgow • University of Hertfordshire • University of Manchester • University of Newcastle • University of Surrey • University of Wales Institute Cardiff • University of Warwick • University of Wolverhampton • Universities UK • WPP Group plc • York St John’s University ORGANISATIONS SUPPORTING CIHE 2010
  3. 3. Businesses facing the same global challenges -• uncertain demand; a volatile economy, worldwide competition for talent and income, managing uncertainty and risk... Governments looking to develop innovation-:• graduates, postgraduates and knowledge exchange key to national growth… The challenging economic climate will require an• entrepreneurial response… Situating Graduate Employability
  4. 4. Challenges in a time of recession A flat interconnected world with peaks of• excellence - universities are central to innovative eco-systems... A ‘race to the top’ requires the development and• application of high value-adding knowledge… Structural shifts in economies… convergence• of manufacturing and services… fundamental and applied research... demand-supply side partnerships…
  5. 5. Developing Entrepreneurial Graduates Putting entrepreneurship at the centre of higher education September 2008 Helen Connor and Wendy Hirsh Influence through Collaboration: Employer Demand for Higher Learning and Engagement with Higher Education Summary Report Universities, Business and Knowledge Exchange Maria Abreu, Vadim Grinevich, Alan Hughes, Michael Kitson and Philip Ternouth Global employers value international experience “The value of [a student’s] international experience goes beyond purely the acquisition of language – it lies in the ability to see business and personal issues from other than your own cultural perspective.” Charles Macleod, Head of UK Resourcing PricewaterhouseCoopers
  6. 6. 1995 AGR Report on “Skills for Graduates in the• 21st Century” suggested: Progress made but not enough…. From To Ladders and Escalators Bridges Career Clarity Fog Employer Customer Job Adding value Functional Identity Project Team Role Career Portfolio Progression Personal Growth Rising Income and Security Maintaining Employability Education and Training Lifelong Learning
  7. 7. Self-reliance skills:• self-management, self-awareness, pro-activity, willingness to learn, self-promotion, networking, planning action. People skills:• team working, inter-personal skills, oral communication, leadership, customer orientation, foreign language skills. Generalist skills:• problem-solving, flexibility, business acumen, IT skills, numeracy, commitment. Specialist skills:• occupational skills, technical skills, understanding commercial goals, company-related expertise, strategic planning skills. Source: Hawkins (1999) The Art of Building Windmills What are employability skills?
  8. 8. Checking what data they have on graduate• prospects; making this available to people. Checking career prospects beyond first job -• keeping in touch with alumni for more than just money. Employability is a key factor in shaping university• choice - school leavers make choices based on prospects. What does this mean for universities?
  9. 9. 86% of employers consider good communication• skills to be important… yet many employers are dissatisfied. ‘Soft skills’ such as team working are also vital…• but numeracy and literacy essential (70%). 65% of international employers say having• overseas professional work experience makes graduates more employable. CIHE Report on Graduate Employability
  10. 10. The Council for Industry and Higher Education Will Archer and Jess Davison Graduate Employability: What do employers think and want? Total number of employees G r a n d Total“1-99” “ 1 0 0 - 999” “1000+” Communication skills 88% 86% 82% 86% Team-working skills 85% 84% 84% 85% Integrity 81% 86% 82% 83% Intellectual ability 81% 84% 78% 81% Confidence 80% 81% 78% 80% Character/personality 81% 79% 60% 75% Planning & organisational skills 74% 72% 75% 74% Literacy (good writing skills) 68% 72% 75% 71% Numeracy (good with numbers) 68% 67% 69% 68% Analysis & decision-making skills 64% 67% 73% 67% Top 10 most important skills for employers
  11. 11. The Council for Industry and Higher Education Will Archer and Jess Davison Graduate Employability: What do employers think and want? Importance Rank Satisfaction Rank Gap Commercial awareness 13 33 -20 Analysis and decision-making skills 10 26 -16 Communication skills 1 16 -15 Literacy (good writing skills) 8 23 -15 Passion 12 25 -13 Relevant work experience 17 30 -13 Planning and organisational skills 7 17 -10 Confidence 5 13 -8 Personal development skills 21 28 -7 Largest importance-satisfaction gap by employers
  12. 12. Competencies evolving: adapting and innovating,• customer facing skills, ethics and integrity, multi- cultural working, self-development. Competencies as stepping stones to comply• with professional standards - technical and behavioural competencies required. Key competencies - flexibility, resilience,• analytical and cognitive skills, passion and drive, continuous personal development, support for others. Competencies for competing globally
  13. 13. Global Horizons and the Role of Employers 1 Global Horizons and the Role of Employers Richard Brown with William Archer and Dr Jennifer Barnes Competencies for competing globally Employability Competencies Competence Cluster Cognitive Skills Analysis, Attention to detail, Judgement Generic Competencies Influencing, Interpersonal sensitivity, Planning and organisation, Questioning, Teamwork and working with others, Listening, Responding, Written communication Personal Capabilities Achievement orientation, Adaptability/ flexibility, Creativity, Decisiveness, Initiative, Innovation, Tolerance for stress, Leadership, Lifelong learning and development, Personal development Technical Ability Technical application, Technical knowledge Business and Organisation Awareness Commercial awareness, Resource management, Financial awareness, Organisation understanding, Organisational sensitivity Practical and Professional Elements Image, Process operation, Ethics, Integrity, Professional expertise
  14. 14. Developing Entrepreneurial Graduates Putting entrepreneurship at the centre of higher education September 2008 A framework for action: Top-level leadership by VCs.• Ownership in faculties and departments.• Finding innovative ways to appropriate• entrepreneurship in subject discipline. Involving entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial• organisations. Developing entrepreneurial graduates for 21st century work
  15. 15. An Implementation Framework for HE… Enabling Environment Entrepreneurial PracticesEngaging Stakeholders Social Enterprises Capacity Building Experiential Approaches Visible Leadership Clarity of Purpose and Outcomes Institutional Culture Institutional Embeddedness Entrepreneurs and Businesses Academic Faculty Multi- disciplinary Cross-campus Reach Developing Entrepreneurial Graduates Entrepreneurship Educators Vice Chancellors Student Clubs and Societies Experimentation and Discovery Engagement with Practice Innovative Pedagogies
  16. 16. Provide enhanced central support for improving• the ‘student experience’. Embed skills development within the programme• of study - accommodate employer needs. Provide work experience within or external to• programmes of study. Enable reflection and recording of skills• development and experience. What can universities do to enhance graduate employability?
  17. 17. Vice-Chancellors... provide visible leadership.• Academics... enable change in the curriculum and• experiences offered. Business and social entrepreneurs... be• fully involved to enrich the student learning experience. Students... value learning experiences where ever• they arise. Governments... support 21• st century higher education by providing over-arching strategic goals, funding and framework for change. Stakeholder actions… agents for change
  18. 18. Change as continuous re-engineering for the 21• st century. Building synergies - harnessing internal and• external stakeholders to drive change. Reward and recognition as levers for changing• behaviour. Broadening HE-business interaction informed by• what works and why. Ownership by all is key!• People driving change…
  19. 19. Links and further information www.agcas.org.uk• www.agr.org.uk• www.heacademy.ac.uk• www.prospects.ac.uk• www.cihe.co.uk• www.durham.ac.uk/cel• www.durham.ac.uk/careers-advice• www.cbi.org.uk/highereducation•
  20. 20. The Council for Industry and Higher Education Using Public Procurement to Stimulate Innovation Philip Ternouth Global Horizons and the Role of Employers 1 Global Horizons and the Role of Employers Richard Brown with William Archer and Dr Jennifer Barnes Universities, Business and Knowledge Exchange Maria Abreu, Vadim Grinevich, Alan Hughes, Michael Kitson and Philip Ternouth The Council for Industry and Higher Education Will Archer and Jess Davison Graduate Employability: What do employers think and want? The Council for Industry and Higher Education Global Horizons for UK Universities John Fielden Untitled-2 1 6/11/07 09:59:09 Leadership for Business and Higher Education The CIHE is a strategic leadership network of businesses and higher education executives promoting a system of higher learning that leads to greater market competitiveness and social well-being. The Council for Industry and Higher Education Keith Herrmann Deputy Chief Executive Studio 11, Tiger House, Burton Street London WC1H 9BY keith.herrmann@cihe.co.uk www.cihe.co.uk A Successful Partnership The Council for Industry and Higher Education 1986 - 2008

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