UTOPIAN PRACTICES
   19 March 2009
WAY BACK
WHY?

 Fast changes in information architectures and the rapid
 innovation cannot be channelled anymore through old
 metho...
LIVING LABS
  There is a growing awareness that to stay ahead of competition
  and to deal with societies diverse needs, c...
CREATIVE RESEARCH
Collaborations between
-  Designers
-  Programmers
-  Users
-  Artists
-  Scientists

Publish or Perish ...
GOTO10: MESHY
   Fall 2007
SCOTTIE
2006/2008
PICNIC LABS
   2008
Green City Lab
ADAM ZARETSKY
This is a document of my first attempt at embryonic transplant surgery. Unfortunately, this is
a tribute to ...
RESULT




                               VALORISATION




Intellectual      Work in
                                     ...
SOME BOLD STATEMENTS

Scientists generate knowledge
Artists generate meaning

Artists want new tools, new practices,
new m...
UTOPIAN PRACTICES

Where do art and science meet?

One day seminar, 19th of March in de Waag,
Nieuwmarkt 4

Collaboration ...
•  Rob Zwijnenberg
•  Susan Kennard – BNMI
      Programme
•  Beatriz da Costa




           SPEAKERS UTOPIAN PRACTICES
 ...
Contact

frank@waag.org
+31 20 557 9898
Utopian Practices
Utopian Practices
Utopian Practices
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Utopian Practices

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How can arts, design and science collaborate to innovate and develop new solutions to old (and new) problems? Presentation for the Virtual Knowledge Studio, 13/2/2009.

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Utopian Practices

  1. 1. UTOPIAN PRACTICES 19 March 2009
  2. 2. WAY BACK
  3. 3. WHY? Fast changes in information architectures and the rapid innovation cannot be channelled anymore through old methodologies, as they are too slow. The old role of the university and text as the generator of new ideas does not longer work in isolation. The fast cycles of iteration of designers and artists (brainstorms with very different people, concepts, prototypes, scenarios of prototypes with real users) and the intuitive ideas of artists who can draw from a history of centuries of ideas, should be taken into account together with the knowledge of the technical developers and the content specialists that are masters of their fields of knowledge. Summit on New Media Art, Policy and Practice Singapore 24-26 July
  4. 4. LIVING LABS There is a growing awareness that to stay ahead of competition and to deal with societies diverse needs, companies, governments and institutions have to search for and implement new ways of innovation. Models in which monolithic knowledge silos compete on a small scale are no longer sufficient in a highly connected world in search of meaning. Ideas and concepts need collaboration with and participation of many disciplines, many of which are not to be found within a single agency, company or department. What is needed is, simply put, collaboration. But how do we achieve mutually beneficial collaboration when people speak different languages, histories, protocols and values? How do they get to understand each other and work from what each participant has to bring to mutual goals – when they succeed to find it? Which practices and tools can help us to speed up the pace of innovation?
  5. 5. CREATIVE RESEARCH Collaborations between -  Designers -  Programmers -  Users -  Artists -  Scientists Publish or Perish / Demo or Die
  6. 6. GOTO10: MESHY Fall 2007
  7. 7. SCOTTIE 2006/2008
  8. 8. PICNIC LABS 2008
  9. 9. Green City Lab
  10. 10. ADAM ZARETSKY This is a document of my first attempt at embryonic transplant surgery. Unfortunately, this is a tribute to the process of trial and error, not a successful transplant operation. If you decide to explore this craft at home, remember to be very patient. It is a difficult and tedious process that demands dexterity and concentration. It also helps to have a mild to potent morbid streak and the ability to deal with a high degree of failure. Strains: 10 Zebrafish Embryos, 19 Hours After Insemination Materials: 1 Dissection Microscope 40X A Variety of MicroSurgical Tools Initially, my plan was to cut the head off of one growing zebrafish embryo and transplant (paste) that head onto another ‘whole’ zebrafish embryo. Done correctly, this might develop into a two-headed, fleshy and fashionable, ‘Mosaic Brut’ designer zebrafish. View more of his work at http://www.emutagen.com/
  11. 11. RESULT VALORISATION Intellectual Work in Prototypes Property Phd’s progress RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Exhibits Patents Papers Experiments Performances Methods Conversations Publications Media Public Interventions
  12. 12. SOME BOLD STATEMENTS Scientists generate knowledge Artists generate meaning Artists want new tools, new practices, new materials, new media Scientists need visualizations, critique and questions that stretch the boundaries Humanities need scientists to be able to reason & come to grasp with beta sciences again
  13. 13. UTOPIAN PRACTICES Where do art and science meet? One day seminar, 19th of March in de Waag, Nieuwmarkt 4 Collaboration between Arts and Genomics Center, Virtual Knowledge Studio (KNAW) and Waag Society Prior reservation necessary due to intimate setting; public announcement coming soon
  14. 14. •  Rob Zwijnenberg •  Susan Kennard – BNMI Programme •  Beatriz da Costa SPEAKERS UTOPIAN PRACTICES 19th of March 2009
  15. 15. Contact frank@waag.org +31 20 557 9898

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