Branding Your Library

8,279 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
8,279
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
323
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
187
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Branding Your Library

  1. 1. Branding Your Library Presented by Jean Ayers Ayers Consulting Group December 12, 2008
  2. 2. Introductions
  3. 3. Program Agenda Topic Time Session 1: 9:30 – 10:30 AM What Is a Brand?  Why Is Branding Important to You & Your  Library? 5 Disciplines of Brand‐Building Break 10:30 – 10:45 AM Session 2: 10:45 – 12:30 What Is Your Library’s Brand? Who Is Your Audience? What Is Your Competition? Branding Signals Lunch 12:30 – 1:30 PM Session 3: 1:30 – 3:00 PM Case Study Getting Your Staff on Board What Next? Review & Closing 3:00 – 3:30 PM
  4. 4. Ground Rules 1. Ask Questions (Give Answers) 2. Take Breaks 3. Have Fun
  5. 5. What Is a Brand?
  6. 6. The Brand Game
  7. 7. What Is a Brand? It’s not a logo
  8. 8. It’s not an “identity”
  9. 9. It’s not a product
  10. 10. A Brand Is… …a person’s gut feeling about an organization, product, or service.
  11. 11. Consider this… A Brand is the sum of the good, the bad, the ugly, and the off‐strategy. It is  defined by your best product as well as your worst product. It is defined  by award‐winning advertising as well as by the god‐awful ads that  somehow slipped through the cracks, got approved, and, not surprisingly,  sank into oblivion. It is defined by the accomplishments of your best  employee—the shining star in the company who can do no wrong—as  well as by the mishaps of the worst hire that you ever made. It is also  defined by your receptionist and the music your customers are subjected  to when placed on hold. For every grand and finely worded public statement by the CEO, the brand is also defined by derisory consumer  comments overheard in the hallway or in a chat room on the Internet.  Brands are sponges for content, for images, for fleeting feelings. They  become psychological concepts held in the minds of the public, where  they may stay forever. As such you can’t entirely control a brand. At best  you only guide and influence it. Bedbury, Scott. A New Brand World: 8 Principles for Achieving Brand Leadership in the  21st Century. New York: Penguin Group, 2002.
  12. 12. Brands that get it
  13. 13. Brand vs. Branding Brand Branding A brand exists in a person’s mind. It’s  Branding is the tangible process of  a collection of feelings and  creating the signals that generate  associations that at person has about  these feelings. your library. Source: Adamson, Allen P. Brand Simple. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
  14. 14. Why Is Branding Important? • People have too many choices and too little  time. • Most offerings have similar quality and  features. • We tend to base our choices on trust.
  15. 15. Why Is Branding Important  to Your Library? • Many libraries are facing cutbacks and some are  even being closed because of bottom‐line  concerns. • Libraries face increasing competition in the  information marketplace. • Libraries are vital only if the community perceives  them as vital. • Effective branding initiatives can raise awareness  and demonstrate the value of your library’s  brand.
  16. 16. Brand or Be Branded Who are you now? Who do you want to be?
  17. 17. The 5 Disciplines  of Brand‐building Source: Neumeier, Marty. The Brand Gap: How to Bridge the Distance  Between Business Strategy and Design. Berkeley, C.A.: New Riders, 2006.
  18. 18. 1. Differentiate • By staying focused on your library’s niche – what  differentiates it from the competition – you are better able to  prove a valuable, indispensable asset to the university (or  community) of which it is a part. • How do you differentiate your brand?  FOCUS. – Who are you? – What do you do? – Why does it matter?
  19. 19. 2. Collaborate
  20. 20. 3. Innovate Zag when others zig. Keep it simple.
  21. 21. 4. Validate Sender Message Receiver
  22. 22. 5. Cultivate Brands are like people. If people can  change their clothes without changing  their fundamental character, why  can’t brands? Old paradigm: Control the look and  feel of a brand. New paradigm: Influence the  character of a brand. If a brand looks like a duck and swims  like a dog, people will distrust it.
  23. 23. What Is Your Library’s Brand?  What differentiates you? Is it unique and relevant to your audience?  Can you deliver on the promise of this brand  idea? 
  24. 24. Your Brand Driver • Create a simple statement of what your  brand stands for. • Make it succinct, focused, and compelling. • This is your brand recipe – make it easy to  remember and follow. • Include: your audience and what  differentiates you that’s relevant to them.
  25. 25. Examples of Brand Drivers • HBO: – To astute TV viewers, HBO is the brand of television  network that provides programming you can’t see  anywhere else. • Pixar: – To parents with young children, Pixar is the brand of  animated move entertainment that appeals to audiences  of all ages. • Target: – To value‐conscious consumers of all income levels, Target  is the brand of discount retailer that delivers great design  at reasonable prices. Source: Adamson, Allen P. Brand Simple. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
  26. 26. A Library = An “Experience Brand” • The brand is experienced by all the senses. • The customer is immersed in your library’s  brand, making it easy to break the promise to  them if a single element provides a conflicting  message. • Every interaction with the customer is an  opportunity to seal or threaten the brand. 
  27. 27. Who Is Your Audience? What do you know about them?  What problem(s) do you help  them solve? Do you know what they want from  you? How often do you survey your  students and faculty?  How do you translate this  knowledge into action? 
  28. 28. Who or What Is Your Competition?
  29. 29. Branding Signals What are all the different touch  points that you have with your  audience? Create a customer journey  map. What messages do you want to send  them that will support your brand?  How can you send these messages? Start with the physical components of  the library.  Next, consider the intangible, the  experiences of those using the  library.
  30. 30. Getting Your Staff on Board
  31. 31. Case Study
  32. 32. 10 Questions 1. What’s your brand idea? (What makes you different and  relevant to your students/faculty?) 2. Does your brand idea align with why you exist? (Can you  deliver on the brand idea?) 3. What’s your brand driver? (What’s your key message?) 4. Who/what is your competition? 5. Who is your audience?  6. How does your audience interact with your library? 7. What areas will drive the biggest return on investment? 8. How will you get your staff on board? 9. Who do you need to work with to set your ideas in motion? 10. How will you measure success?
  33. 33. Next Steps: Where to Go from Here?
  34. 34. Review • A brand exists in your mind • 5 steps to brand‐building 1. Differentiate 2. Collaborate 3. Innovate 4. Validate 5. Cultivate • Define your audience and competition • Create your branding signals • Get everyone on board • Deliver on the promise of your brand
  35. 35. Bibliography Adamson, Allen P. Brand Simple. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. Bedbury, Scott. A New Brand World: 8 Principles for  Achieving Brand Leadership in the 21st Century. New  York: Penguin Group, 2002. Dempsey, Beth. “Target Your Brand.” Library Journal 129.13  (August 2004): 32‐5  http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA443911.html  Neumeier, Marty. The Brand Gap: How to Bridge the  Distance Between Business Strategy and Design.  Berkeley, C.A.: New Riders, 2006.
  36. 36. Jean Ayers jean.ayers@gmail.com

×