Borrow Direct: A Vision for Excellent Service

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Borrow Direct: A Vision for Excellent Service

  1. 1. Borrow Direct: A VISION FOR EXCELLENT SERVICE Bart Hollingsworth, Brown University Carol Jones, Yale University NELINET Resource Sharing Conference 2009 19 June 2009
  2. 2. Borrow Direct Timeline, pt.1 • 1992 - Ohiolink • 1993 – North American Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery Project (NAILLD) • 1994-1999 – Planning, development, testing – Library Directors from Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University – RLG – software vendor CPS – Circulation staff
  3. 3. The Why • Increasing volume of ILL requests • Rising costs of providing ILL services • Opportunity to collaborate with peer institutions and meet provosts’ expectations • Willingness to experiment and leverage technologies
  4. 4. The Vision • Convenient access to collections at peer institutions; “extended circulation” • Success factors – Platform independent – Turnaround time of 4 business days – Fill rate of 85% – Cost less than $10 per transaction
  5. 5. The How Core service agreements • Commercial delivery (UPS) to single address • Reciprocal relationships; no fees • Current faculty, students, and staff eligible • Consistent turnaround • One month loan period • Books only
  6. 6. Institutional Autonomy Each institution • Determine how local patrons will be authenticated for using Borrow Direct • Decide which libraries and collections will be available • Customize email messages • Customize paging slips/book bands • Determine placement of BD within the larger organization; manage local staffing and workflow
  7. 7. Efficiencies • Patron-initiated (unmediated) • Web-based staff module; no client to install • Fewer processing steps – Borrowing: update to received and returned – Lending: print paging slips, retrieve books, update to shipped, update to complete • Automatic email notifications at various steps in the process
  8. 8. More Efficiencies • No lending request verification • Software determines lender string – Which libraries own requested item – Which libraries have item available – Load balancing • Borrow Direct-ILS interaction – Update to shipped in BD, auto-checkout in ILS – Discharge in ILS, auto-complete in BD
  9. 9. And a few drawbacks … • No renewals • Known item searching • Multiple volumes of same title require separate requests • Automatic emails generated immediately upon updating of record • No “note function”
  10. 10. Borrow Direct Timeline, pt.2 • 11/29/1999 – Borrow Direct pilot project began • Late 2001 - Library directors declare Borrow Direct pilot project a success and expansion • Fall 2002 – Four additional institutions join Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, and Princeton
  11. 11. Borrow Direct Timeline, pt. 3 • 2007 – Directors, Policy Group, and Operations Group (BDOG) begin discussions of future development • 2009 – 1,000,000th request; 10th anniversary
  12. 12. Impact of Expansion • More books, more patrons • In 2000 - 1,547 items borrowed • In 2008 - 137,548 items borrowed
  13. 13. Brown’s experience • Same platform used successfully, since 2000 by Boston Library Consortium (BLC) for Virtual Catalog initiative • Brown patrons familiar with this model and the system • Staff familiar with platform, minimal training
  14. 14. Brown’s experience • Brown 2004 study of 200 requests; – 54% of items obtained through Borrow Direct were owned by Brown – 10% of items obtained through ILL owned by Brown – 36% of items obtained through ILL were held by Borrow Direct libraries – 66% of items obtained through Borrow Direct published in the past 10 years – 10% of items obtained through ILL published in the past 10 years
  15. 15. Savings • Shipping costs per item reduced by 2/3 • No fees for borrowing transactions • Per transaction cost reduced – Borrowing: ILL $19.72 BD $7.67 – Lending: ILL $20.56 BD $7.29
  16. 16. The Vision for Borrow Direct • Cost-driven [<$10] • Automated • Ease of use – for readers and – for staff
  17. 17. What we learned: SURPRISES • Change user expectation • Sheer volume • Meeting turn around time • Collegiality • Product Sale • Underestimated Installation Work • Equipment & Software
  18. 18. What next? • New platform • Expanding membership? • Strategic collection development? • Study : weighing resource sharing resources and collection development budgets
  19. 19. Thanks Questions?

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