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University of Missouri-Columbia, Cardiovascular Diagnosis from Ballistocardiogram

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Cardiovascular Diagnosis from Ballistocardiogram presented for Whiteboard2Boardroom on October 30, 2018

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University of Missouri-Columbia, Cardiovascular Diagnosis from Ballistocardiogram

  1. 1. Cardiovascular Diagnosis from Ballistocardiogram October 30, 2018
  2. 2. What is the problem? • Electrocardiograms (ECGs) model cardiac functioning and enable diagnosis of improper functioning • Ballistocardiograms (BCGs) model cardiovascular functioning, and potentially provide rich information on the cardiovascular loop – Theoretically, BCGs should model functioning of large arteries and can be used to pinpoint improper functioning of the carotid artery, ascending aorta, etc. – However, the curve is poorly understood, so BCGs are not used clinically
  3. 3. How does product/service solve problem? • Giovanna Guidoboni developed a closed loop mathematical model that simulates the mechanisms generating the BCG signal • The solution provides a quantitative framework for the clinical interpretation of BCG signals
  4. 4. What is the market use? Sensing Modality (1) Sensing Modality (3) Sensing Modality (2) (Hydraulic Bed Sensor) (Weighing scale, …) (Accelerometer) Fig. 5. Simulated pressure waveforms are compared with experimental measurements at different sites along the arterial tree. [Moein: can you please send me the .m file to obtain this figure? We need to edit some things a little.] between BCG waveforms reported in different studies. I J K L M N Fig. 6. Waveform f A (t) associated with the acceleration of the body motion simulated via the closed-loop model over one cardiac cycle. The waveform exhibits the typical I, J, K, L, M and N peaks that characterize BCG signals measured experimentally. Figure 6 reports the waveform f A (t) simulated via the closed-loop model over one cardiac cycle. The waveform exhibits the typical I, J, K, L, M and N peaks that characterize BCG signals measured experimentally [1], [6], [17], thereby confirming the capability of the closed-loop model to capture the fundamental cardiovascular mechanisms that give rise to the BCG signal. A quantitative comparison between the simulated BCG Fig. 7. BCG waveforms for displacement, velocity and acceleration, denoted by f D , f V and f A , respectively. The figure reports the waveforms simulated via the closed-loop model, the theoretical waveforms calculated by Noorder- graaf and Heynekamp [16] and the experimental waveforms obtained by Inan et al [17] Kim et al [6] and our group. waveforms pertaining to displacement, velocity and accel- eration of the center of mass is reported in Figure 7 by means of the auxiliary functions f D , f V and f A . The wave- forms simulated via the closed-loop model are compared with (i) the theoretical results presented by Noordergraaf and Heynekamp [16], where we calculated velocity and accelera- A(t)
  5. 5. What competition exists?
  6. 6. What is the status of the intellectual property? • Patent pending
  7. 7. What is the stage of development? • Prototype built and tested on a small number of subjects
  8. 8. What is needed for further development? • More validation with more patients • Refinement of model for improved accuracy • Development of BCG sensing system • Find an entrepreneur/licensee with cardiovascular expertise for partnering on validation – Medical grade application for physicians – Remote monitoring applications such as embodying the invention in a chair or bed
  9. 9. Contact For more information please contact Jim Baxendale, Director of Whiteboard2Boardroom:baxendalej@umkc.edu.

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