Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Ecological approaches to educational data

348 views

Published on

Communicative ecology analysis

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Ecological approaches to educational data

  1. 1. Riga, 16.12.2016 Ecosystem approaches in education: Communicative ecology and networks Kai Pata kpata@tlu.ee Senior researcher in Digital Learning Ecosystems Tallinn University, School for Digital Technologies
  2. 2. Goals of the workshop • Applying ecological principles from natural science in social science? • Two case studies: adult education services for vulnerable young adults; online professional networks • Methods: Communicative Ecology approach; Network approach • Data collection • Unit of analysis and data representation • Representation of results • Interpreting the results with ecological principles
  3. 3. Ecology/ecosystem – not just the metaphor but transferrable principles and processes • Main goal of ecosystems: to permeate the transformative flow, Ecosystem productivity as an ability to accumulate, transform • Means: Network of interdepending species and the environment – connectivity, distribution, clusters Information flow Knowledge transformation Knowledge accumulation in the system
  4. 4. The network structure • The permeability of a AE service ecosystem will depend on the connections between services that pass access to transformative learning opportunities and the emerging side-paths and hubs in this network that can redirect the flows.
  5. 5. Ecology/ecosystem – not just the metaphor but transferrable principles and processes • Means: • Diversity of species. Variation of specimen within species Species as kind of similar elements/ objects/ subjects
  6. 6. No learner is the same, yet we have unified AE opportunities Educational deficiency Language deficiency Social constraints Disability Cultural constraints Legislative constraints Economic constraints Regional constraints Personal characteristics Etc.
  7. 7. What this network can be in education? • Learning opportunities • Services to enable access to services • Different type of learners that need these opportunities
  8. 8. What this network can be in education? • Communicative actions about learning opportunities, learners, counsellors, AE educators, devices, channels ADULT LEARNER BECOMING INFORMED OF OR CONSTRAINED OF AE OPPORTUNITIES
  9. 9. Ecology/ecosystem – not just the metaphor but transferrable principles and processes • Means: Communication and interactions. • Within and between species. • Mutual awareness. • Direct and indirect (signals in environment). Information, Signals, Meanings INFORMATION SOURCES AND THEIR ACCESS
  10. 10. Ecology/ecosystem – not just the metaphor but transferrable principles and processes • Means: • Coalitions, distribution, clusters of species and organisms • Mutualisms: synergy, parasitism, competition Synergy of services Competition of goals
  11. 11. Ecology/ecosystem – not just the metaphor but transferrable principles and processes • Means: • Accommodation to specific conditions, fitness to niches • Feedback loop to and from the niches • Successive stages of ecosystems, dynamically changing Niches as abstract needs’ spaces to be fit NICHE as fitness space
  12. 12. Context 1: Vulnerable Adult Learners’ Access to Education • Big question: What creates vulnerability to access HE education? • STEPS: Defining AE Service Ecosystem components and its niches not accessible to vulnerable subjects • What are available AE opportunities – courses etc.? (kind of species) • What are vulnerability characteristics (kind of niche dimensions, that describe variability of individuals)
  13. 13. Context 1: Vulnerable Adult Learners’ Access to Education • What are available services for adult learning targeting active citizenship? What are available services for vulnerable people? (kind of flow paths to be activated by individuals to access AE opportunities)? • What are mutualisms between AE and vulnerability services in Service ecosystem? (synergies as flow enablers, antagonisms as flow constraints)? • How can the AE opportunities be accessed in case of different (combined) vulnerability characteristics? ( who are restricted from AE?)
  14. 14. AE ecosystem example • Vulnerability is appearing as a lack to fit to certain ecosystem services and results in restricting AE opportunities. CARETAKER OF MINORS REGIONAL ACCESS LIMIT EDUCATIONAL DEFICIENCY LIMIT SOCIAL SERVICES: - CHILDCARE SUPPORT - FREE CHILDCARE CENTER AT AE AE SERVICES: - DORMITORY - SCHOLARSHIP - TRAVEL ALLOWANCE - VALIDATION OF INFORMAL COMPETENCES ETC. - TRAINING AT WORKPLACES SECONDARY EDUCATION ADULT GYMNASIUM SECONDARY EDUCATION BASED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION CITIZENSHIP SERVICES: - FREE LANGUAGE COURSES LANGUAGE DEFICIENCY ETC. BASIC EDUCATION BASED APPLIED UNIVERSITY SOCIO-ECONOMIC DISADVANTAGE opportunities services vulnerability characteristics
  15. 15. What data are available? • Service descriptions, interviews with adult educators and vulnerable young adults -> network • Considering AE opportunities as actors and • AE related service enablers/constraints as ties • Vulnerability characteristics as actors In the end of the workshop we try to search and map such data collectively • Open questions: • How to structure data? • What can be seen from data? • What are limitations of data visualization?
  16. 16. Context 2: Online professional networks • Sample of threads from professional networks in healthcare and construction • Unit of analysis: turn-taking in thread • Inductive codes for content categories • Frequency of ties between inductive codes in threads • SNA data of sequential turn- takings in threads Csv file Gephy.org Social Network analysis tool
  17. 17. Context 2: Online professional networks • Sample of threads from professional networks in healthcare and construction • Unit of analysis: turn-taking in thread • Inductive codes for content categories • Frequency of ties between inductive codes in threads • SNA data of sequential turn- takings in threads Pata, Santos, Burchert, 2016
  18. 18. Mapping the flows of knowledge transformation Context 2: Online professional networks
  19. 19. Context 1: Vulnerable Adult Learners’ Access to Education • Big question 2: How knowledge of AE opportunities and the whole AE Service ecosystem is communicated to individuals with vulnerability characteristics? • Subjects: AE providing stakeholders, AE policy-makers, vulnerable young adults • Focusing particularly on communication subjects’ (WHO?), -places (WHERE?), -contexts (WHEN? WHY?), - content (WHAT?) and existing/missing communication flows to AE opportunities and services
  20. 20. Communicative Ecology approach • A holistic approach to understanding the dynamic interrelationships between social dimensions, discourse and communications technology in both physical and digital environments • Media technologies should be examined and designed in their context of use, with reference to the users' wider set of social relationships, the nature of the communication itself and other media in use Jo Tacchi McLuhan: Media ecology Altheide: Ecology of communication
  21. 21. Communicative Ecology approach • There is not a single, agreed upon communicative ecology model • A set of ethnographic tools to examine how a new form of media or technology may or may not be integrated into existing communication patterns • Qualitative methods: observation, interviews, diaries, artifacts, content analysis, participatory design etc.
  22. 22. Communicative ecology data • Scope of data collection: holistic, external overview/internal perspective, space bounded, time-scope • Mapping: drawing the conceptual maps and creating or collecting oral or written descriptions • Person-perspective mapping • Community perspective mapping
  23. 23. Communicative Ecology characteristics • Context-dependent: • anchored in geographical/digital location and may move seamlessly between these locations; • contextually defined affordances of places that may be fit for some but hinder others • Successive dynamically changing stages: • dependent of its inhabitants’ lifestyles, stages may be socio-culturally animated • Activity dependent: • work/formal/leisure/domestic/personal
  24. 24. ComEco3 Jo Tacchi slide
  25. 25. https://comcultgirl.wordpress.com/tag/technology/
  26. 26. Figure by Singh http://www.slideshare.net/abhigyan1107/design-challenges-for-sustainable-mobile-community- communication-services-for-indian-urban-slums
  27. 27. Figure by Singh http://www.slideshare.net/abhigyan1107/design-challenges-for-sustainable-mobile-community- communication-services-for-indian-urban-slums
  28. 28. Chininthorn et al. ( 2016) figure Exploration of Deaf People’s Health Information Sources and Techniques for Information Delivery in Cape Town
  29. 29. Communicative Ecology characteristics • Three intricately entwined and mutually constitutive layers: • Social (social structures, networks), discursive (themes or content) and technological (communication media, devices and applications, communication models) • preliminary step isolated layers’ analysis • Dimensions: • global/local, networked/collective, online/offline
  30. 30. Context 1: Vulnerable Adult Learners’ Access to Education • Big question 2: How knowledge of AE opportunities and the whole AE Service ecosystem is communicated to individuals with vulnerability characteristics? • Holistic – to vulnerability characteristics, not to particular stereotypes? • Externally observed? • Places, activities as person-perspectives who has certain vulnerability characteristics • Ecosystem stages, time-scope as learning periods
  31. 31. Workshop activity in pairs • Find one AE opportunity type in basic, secondary, vocational or higher education level (e.g. read a curriculum syllabus) • Find what information is available about access/restrictive constraints to this AE opportunity (in syllabus, at webpage, at ministry page) • Find what social and other services are available to support vulnerable young people access to this AE opportunity (at webpage, at ministry page) • What vulnerability characteristics are considered in accessing this AE opportunity • From where was information found?
  32. 32. Workshop activity in pairs • Map your findings in the format that could be used for network analysis (excel spreadsheet) goo.gl/GRjTJ7
  33. 33. Workshop activity in pairs goo.gl/GRjTJ7
  34. 34. Workshop activity results • What vulnerability characteristics were restricting access to AE opportunities? • Try to map on the paper the discursive layer (WHAT?) and media-technology layer (WHERE?) of the communicative ecology of AE

×