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Plagiarism - August 2017

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What is plagiarism and how can it be avoided? This presentation will define plagiarism, give examples, and provide tips on avoiding plagiarism.

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Plagiarism - August 2017

  1. 1. Plagiarism Kristy Padron, MLIS Reference & Instruction Librarian Florida Atlantic University Libraries kpadron@fau.edu • Real Case Scenarios • What is Plagiarism? • Why Does it Matter? • What are the Consequences? • Specific Examples • Avoiding Plagiarism
  2. 2. Real Case Scenarios  A newspaper reporter was accused of making up information in many of his news stories.  For a poetry project, my classmate copied rap lyrics and told the instructor he wrote them.  A student purchased a term paper from an internet site and turned it in as her own work. What do these scenarios have in common?
  3. 3. What is Plagiarism? • Anytime anyone uses the work of someone else and passes it off as his or her own. • “Work” in a college setting may be (but is not limited to): – Papers and Writing Assignments – Books or Articles – Facts or Information – Research, Experiments, and Data – Poetry, Music, and Other Creative Works
  4. 4. Why Does It Matter? • In college assignments, most professors and instructors require you to document your sources of information and who had the original idea. • Proper Attribution: when a person receives credit and recognition for their ideas. • General Structure of Research: people who read an intellectual work will see where the author got his or her information.
  5. 5. What are the consequences of plagiarism? • In College or a University: – A failing grade for the assignment – A low grade for the class – Suspension or expulsion • At Work: – Disciplinary Action – Job Loss – Damaged Reputation – Lawsuits (and expensive, at that!)
  6. 6. Specific Examples of Plagiarism 1. Copying. o Cutting and directly pasting content from a source (magazine, article) to an assignment (or paper). o Using an assignment written by someone else and passing it off as your own. o Using an assignment originally done for one class and using it in another (also known as self plagiarism). 2. Improper Paraphrasing. o Having an attributed idea be worded too similarly to its original work. 3. No Attribution. o Not providing attribution or giving credit to the person with the original idea or not commonly known fact. o Not citing a source in the body of a paper or including it in the bibliography.
  7. 7. What does not fall under plagiarism? 1. Using common knowledge and basic facts. • The head of the U.S. federal government is the president. 2. Using ideas from original works that are adequately paraphrased AND given proper attribution. • In-line citations. • Including information on a original work in a bibliography. 3. Original works and ideas that are not credited to anyone else. • A well-supported conclusion based on attributed points.
  8. 8. How to Avoid Plagiarism 1. ALWAYS CITE SOURCES. It’s better to over-cite than the opposite. o Example: In 2013, the population of Miami was 2,617,136 (U.S. Census Bureau). 2. CORRECTLY USE A CITATION STYLE, AS DEFINED BY THE MOST CURRENT EDITION OF A STYLE GUIDE. Commonly Used Guides: o Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) o MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (MLA) o The Chicago Manual of Style 3. MAINTAIN A THOROUGH BIBLIOGRAPHY OR REFERENCE LIST OF ALL SOURCES USED.
  9. 9. 4. DO NOT CUT AND PASTE unless you do ALL of the following: – Cite your sources and provide proper acknowledgement. – Use your style guide’s format for copied information (use quotations, indentations, or whatever it dictates); AND – Use the copied information to support your point or argument by connecting it with your own statement(s) of why it supports it. X How to Avoid Plagiarism
  10. 10. 5. PROPER PARAPHRASING: Read carefully through what you intend to paraphrase, then rewrite the idea in your own words without using the original work as a guide. Also, check your paraphrase against the original text to be sure you have not unintentionally used the same phrases or words, and that the information is correct. How to Avoid Plagiarism
  11. 11. 6. GIVE YOURSELF ENOUGH TIME TO WORK ON YOUR ASSIGNMENT: Plagiarism is often done when someone is rushed and copies work just to get something finished. Choosing a topic, finding information, and writing takes time, so plan accordingly! How to Avoid Plagiarism
  12. 12. Which is an example of plagiarism? ___ David Lynch is an American movie director. ___ Lynch employs his opposition of the "open" versus "closed" body to critique dominant read ings and depictions of the infantile body as a site of innocence, rather than a locus of horror and astonishment. (BTW, this was copied from an article and then pasted onto a paper just like this). ___ Wild at Heart received mixed reviews from movie critics. David Denby of New York Magazine described it as “a malignant work… full of self-mocking trash as well as perfervid excitement (Dunne 6).” Source: Dunne, Michael. “Wild at Heart Three Ways: Lynch, Gifford, Bakhtin.” Literature Film Quarterly 23.1 (1995): 6-13. Humanities Full Text. Web. 9 Sept. 2014.
  13. 13. Original Text: References to Oz abound in Lynch’s films, as James M. Welsh attests in his review article in Magill’s Cinema Annual (399-400). Lula and Sailor are hounded by a maniacal Margaret Hamilton-like laugh, probably emanating from Lula’s mother, Marietta, who is variously depicted rubbing a crystal ball with her long, red fingernails, tiding through the air on a broom, and wearing slippers that turn up in the front and disappearing in a puff of smoke. Source: Dunne, Michael. “Wild at Heart Three Ways: Lynch, Gifford, Bakhtin.” Literature Film Quarterly 23.1 (1995): 6-13. Humanities Full Text. Web. 9 Sept. 2014. As Used in an Assignment: ___ Lynch’s films have many references to Wizard of Oz. In Lynch’s Wild at Heart, Lula’s mother, Marietta, is shown rubbing a crystal ball with her long, red fingernails, tiding through the air on a broom and disappearing in a puff of smoke like the Wicked Witch (Dunne 9).
  14. 14. Do you need assistance? • Ask your professor or instructor. • The library can assist with the research process and in finding citation style guides. FAU Libraries: www.fau.edu/library • Reference Desk: (561) 297-3785 • Ask a Librarian (chat, text, email): www.askalibrarian.org/fau • Request a Research Consultation: www.tinyurl.com/consult-orient P.S. For the sake of not committing plagiarism and then to model proper attribution, the content in the second option listed on Slide 11 comes from the following source: Taylor, Aaron. “Rough Beasts Slouch Toward Bethlehem to be Born: Eraserhead and the Grotesque Infant (Whose Hour has Come Around at Last). Revue Canadienne d'Études cinématographiques / Canadian Journal of Film Studies 9.2: 55-69. JSTOR. Web. 23 Aug. 2017.

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