Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Finding Impact Factor and Other Journal-Level Metrics

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 33 Ad

Finding Impact Factor and Other Journal-Level Metrics

Download to read offline

Get an overview of journal-level bibliometrics such as Journal Impact Factor, CiteScore, Eigenfactor Score, and others. Find out how they are calculated and where they can be found! Recommended for faculty, graduate students, post-doctorates, or anyone interested in scholarly publications.

For a self-graded quiz and Certificate of Completion, go to https://bit.ly/scs-quiz1

More information about journal-level metrics: https://https://bit.ly/scs-impact-find

Get an overview of journal-level bibliometrics such as Journal Impact Factor, CiteScore, Eigenfactor Score, and others. Find out how they are calculated and where they can be found! Recommended for faculty, graduate students, post-doctorates, or anyone interested in scholarly publications.

For a self-graded quiz and Certificate of Completion, go to https://bit.ly/scs-quiz1

More information about journal-level metrics: https://https://bit.ly/scs-impact-find

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Slideshows for you (19)

Similar to Finding Impact Factor and Other Journal-Level Metrics (20)

Advertisement

More from Kristy Padron (20)

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

Finding Impact Factor and Other Journal-Level Metrics

  1. 1. Finding Impact Factors and Other Journal-Level Metrics Scholarly Communication Services (SCS) By Kristy Padron, MLIS SCS Coordinator and Associate University Librarian kpadron@fau.edu https://library.fau.edu/staff/kpadron June 2020
  2. 2. I heard of the eigenfactor, but… …what exactly is it? What if a journal doesn’t have an impact factor? I’m confused! Same here! I couldn’t find one for where I published. Image Credits: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  3. 3. • Define bibliometrics, their purpose, and use. • Introduce types of journal-level metrics. • Outline ways to find them. • Describe some issues regarding their use. Workshop Objectives Image Credit: by K. Padron, 2020.
  4. 4. Bibliometrics: A Short Intro  Definition: the statistical analysis of publications, books, or articles (Duberman & Sieving, 2017). bi-blē-ə-ˈme-triks Image Credit: by K. Padron, 2020.
  5. 5. Bibliometrics: A Short Intro  Initial Uses: • Examine scholarly networks. • (Scholars) Identify relevant sources. • (Libraries) Select journals and works for collections. Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  6. 6. Bibliometrics: A Short Intro  Current Uses: • Identify seminal journals (for reading or publication) • Measure productivity and influence • Descriptive/ evaluative purposes: • Researcher productivity • Bids for promotion and tenure • Grant funding • Hiring Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  7. 7. Types of Bibliometrics Journal-Level* • Quantitative measurements of quality and influence of journals generated through using citation formulas. Article-Level • Descriptions of reach and impact of published research articles. Author-Level • Measurements of publication activity for individuals. Altmetrics** • Indications of impact through mentions, media coverage, shares, and other online interactions.Image Credit: Conservation & Society, 2020. http://www.conservationandsociety.org/currentissue.asp. Permission by CC BY-NC-SA.
  8. 8. Journal-Level Metrics  Journal Impact Factor (JIF)  CiteScore Metrics  Source Normalized Impact Per Paper (SNIP)  SCImago Journal Rank  Eigenfactor Score Company/ Organization Brief Description of What is Measured Number of Years Sources of Information URLs to Find a Metric
  9. 9. Journal Impact Factor (JIF)  Product / Company: Journal Citation Reports (JCR) by Clarivate Analytics, WOS Group • Other metrics by JCR: • 5-Year Impact Factor • Cited Half-Life • Immediacy Index  Most widely known, influential in STEM disciplines.  Identifies the frequency in which an average article from a journal is cited within a year.  Evaluates or compares a journal’s relative importance with others in the same field (Web of Science Group, 2020). Image Credit: Clarivate Analytics, Web of Science Group. https://clarivate.com/webofscie ncegroup/
  10. 10. Journal Impact Factor (JIF)  Citable Items: published articles and reviews.  Excluded: letters, editorial materials.  Source of Journals and Data: Web of Science (Social Science Citation Index and Science Citation Index Expanded). Journal Impact Factor (2020) # Citations for its articles published in 2018 and 2019 # Citable items published in the journal in 2018 and 2019  Formula: =
  11. 11. Journal Impact Factor (JIF)  Find JIF: • Journal Citation Report (JCR) – not available through FAU • Visit a journal’s home page. Image Source: The Quarterly Journal of Economics, https://academic.oup.com/qje
  12. 12. Journal Impact Factor (JIF)  Find JIF:  Journal Citation Report (JCR) – not available through FAU  Visit a journal’s home page.
  13. 13. CiteScore Metrics  Product/ Company: Scopus by Elsevier  Includes STEM, social sciences, and arts and humanities.  Calculated once per year. • CiteScore Tracker: measures metrics month-by- month in the current year.  Not a field-normalized metric. • A CiteScore for a journal in one discipline should not be compared to the score of a journal in another. Image Credit: Scopus. https://www.scopus.com
  14. 14. CiteScore Metrics  Formula: Average # citations received per article in a journal in the past 3 years # Documents indexed in Scopus in the past 3 years  Citable Items: peer-reviewed journals, trade publications, books, conference papers, patents, and more.  Source of Journals and Data: journals and various publications indexed in Scopus. CiteScore (Current Year) =
  15. 15. CiteScore Metrics  Find CiteScore: scopus.com/sources
  16. 16. Source Normalized Impact Per Paper (SNIP)  Product/ Organization: CWTS Journal Indicators by Leiden University  Accounts for differences in citation practices between science fields.  Citation density: how frequently other works and publications are cited within a field.  Citable Items: articles, conference papers, or reviews.  Source of Journals and Data: journals and various publications indexed in Scopus. Image Credit: CWTS. https://www.journalindicators.com
  17. 17. Source Normalized Impact Per Paper (SNIP)  Formula: Average # of times a journal was cited in past 3 years Harmonic average # of references in publications with past 3 years in subject field* *Subject field is determined by what publications in year of analysis had at least 1 reference to a given journal and proportion of publications with at least 1 active reference in citing journals (Waltman, van Eck, van Leeuwne, & Visser, 2013). SNIP (Current = Year)
  18. 18. Source Normalized Impact Per Paper (SNIP)  Find SNIP: www.journalindicators.com
  19. 19. SCImago Journal Rank  Product/ Organization: SCImago by SCImago Lab/ University of Granada, Extremadura, Carlos III (Madrid) and Alcalá de Henares  Captures the effect of the subject field, quality, and reputation a journal has on a citation.  Limits self citations (a maximum of 33% of its references are allowed).  Citable Items: articles, reviews, and conference papers.  Source of Journals and Data: Scopus by Elsevier Image Credit: SCImago Lab. https://www.scimagolab.com/
  20. 20. SCImago Journal Rank  Formula: Computed in 2 phases (González-Pereira, Guerrero- Bote, & Maya-Anegón, 2010). • Phase 1: Computation of prestige SJR (PSJR): a size- dependent measure that reflects overall journal prestige. • 3 Criteria: Prestige value: A minimum prestige value for being in Scopus Publication prestige: Number of published articles within a 3-year window. Citation prestige: Number and importance of citations from other journals. • Phase 2: Normalization of PSJR to give a size-dependent metric that can be used for comparisons. • Uses number of primary items published by a journal to normalize score.
  21. 21. SCImago Journal Rank  Find SJR: www.scimagojr.com/journalrank.php
  22. 22. Eigenfactor Score  Organization: Eigenfactor.org at University of Washington  Last updates on their website: 2015.  Attempts to capture the influence and prestige of journals through its citation networks.  Scores are scaled to where Eigenfactor scores of all journals (that are given scores) amount to 100, and…  …a journal’s score implies percentage of influence. • If a journal has an Eigenfactor score of 1.0, it has 1% of the total influence of all journals included in their analysis (Eigenfactor.Org, n.d.). Image Credit: Eigenfactor.Org. http://www.eigenfactor.org/
  23. 23. Eigenfactor Score  Citable Items: published articles and reviews.  Excluded: Self-citations  Source of Journals and Data: Web of Science (Social Science Citation Index and Science Citation Index Expanded).
  24. 24. Eigenfactor Score  Find Eigenfactor Score: www.Eigenfactor.org
  25. 25. Caveats of Journal Metrics Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  26. 26. Caveats of Journal Metrics  They do not readily apply to all disciplines because of their publishing and citation norms.  Used more in fields with high citation density.  Not easily applicable to fields that publish in monographs (books) or other types of publications that are not journals.  Favor long-established journals and those that publish a large number of articles. Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  27. 27. Caveats of Journal Metrics  The formulas used to generate them are frequently criticized. • Statistical issues • Lack of transparency • Included and excluded publications  Metrics can be gamed: excessive self-citation, “citation cartels” by publishers. Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  28. 28. Caveats of Journal Metrics  Some metrics are not field- normalized.  There is no standardized metric or ranking for impact that includes all subjects.  Determining what a “good metric” or number may be quite complicated.  Misuse. Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  29. 29. Find Journal-Level Metrics  Visit a journal’s home page.  Go to a bibliometric’s site.  Search in Journal Citation Reports.  What if I can’t find one?  It may not have been given a metric.  It wasn’t included in Scopus or Web of Science.  It hasn’t been around long enough (3 year minimum).Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  30. 30. More Information  Research Impact LibGuide https://bit.ly/scs-impact  Scholarly Communication Services Home https://bit.ly/scs-fau • Topics and information • Request SCS Services: consultations, presentations (class and groups) Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  31. 31. Thank You (and Quiz)  Quiz: https://bit.ly/scs-quiz1  Give your feedback! https://bit.ly/scs-campus Image Credit: Pixabay.com. Permission by CC0.
  32. 32. Works Cited Duberman, J.A., & Sieving, P.C. (2017). Information resources for the clinical researcher. In Gallin, J.I., Ogibene, F.P., & Johnson, L.L., Principles and practice of clinical research (4th Ed.). Academic Press. Eigenfactor.Org (n.d.). About the Eigenfactor® Project [Web page]. http://www.eigenfactor.org/about.php González-Pereira, B., Guerrero-Bote, V.P., & Maya-Anegón, F. (2010). A new approach to the metrics of journals’ scientific prestige: The SJR Indicator. Journal of Informetrics, 4(3): 379-391. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2010.03.002 Waltman, L., van Eck, N.J., van Leeuwen, T.N., Visser, M.S. (2013). Some modifications to the SNIP journal impact factor. Journal of Informetrics, 7(2): 272-285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2012.11.011 Web of Science Group (2020). Journal Citation Report: Learn the basics [Web page]. https://libguides.com/JCR/basics West, J.D., Bergstrom, T.C., & Bergstrom, C.T. (2010). The Eigenfactor MetricsTM: A network approach assessing scholarly journals. College & Research Libraries, 71(3). https://doi.org/10.5860/0701236
  33. 33. Finding Impact Factors and Other Journal-Level Metrics Scholarly Communication Services (SCS) By Kristy Padron, MLIS SCS Coordinator and Associate University Librarian kpadron@fau.edu https://library.fau.edu/staff/kpadron June 2020

Editor's Notes

  • Mathematics has low citation density while this is high the health sciences.
  • (uses their assignment criteria to define types of documents).
  • Was partially a attempt to map the structure of science UW’s Information School West Lab and Dept. ot of Biology Bergstrom Lab.
    Citations from highly ranked or prestigious journals are weighed to make a larger contribution to the score.
  • Formula: examines a journal’s citation counts, those within its field, and a journal’s citation network with other journals over a 5-year period.
    Field categories: each journal belongs to only 1 category which is determined by citation patterns.
    Users can search journal rankings by both JCR category and Eigenfactor.
    Favors journals that publish a high number of articles and are highly cited.
  • Disciplines who traditionally did not use metrics may be measured the same as those who do.
  • Disciplines who traditionally did not use metrics may be measured the same as those who do.
  • Disciplines who traditionally did not use metrics may be measured the same as those who do.
  • Originally created to study scholarly networks, identify relevant work, and assist with making selections for libraries.

×