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Resident-oriented solutions and other development prospects for housing

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Presentation given in FCG Finnish Consulting Group Oy
seminar called "Asumispäivä"in Helsinki Congress Paasitorni 13.2.2013.

Published in: Design, Technology

Resident-oriented solutions and other development prospects for housing

  1. 1. RESIDENT-ORIENTED SOLUTIONS AND OTHER DEVELOPMENT PROSPECTS FOR HOUSING HELSINKI CONGRESS PAASITORNI ASUMISPÄIVÄ 13.2.2013 SINI KOTILAINEN
  2. 2. TECHNOLOGY-CENTRED PRODUCER’S MARKET RESIDENT-ORIENTED LIVING ENVIRONMENT PROMOTING INDIVIDUAL WELLBEING?
  3. 3. physicality consciousness situationality THE HOLISTIC CONCEPTION OF MAN BY LAURI RAUHALA Rauhala 1977.
  4. 4. NO CHALLENGES ! FOR FUTURE RESIDENTS!
  5. 5. FINNISH HOUSING DESIGN: FULL OF MEASURABLE GOALS STANDARDS NORMS LAWS DECREES REGULATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS QUALIFICATION SYSTEMS Our housing production is squeezed through a dense national sieve of norms. Puustinen 2010, 328. EVEN QUALITY SIMILARITY “Finnish norm control leads to the blind implementation of the norms and thus often even to impractical solutions”. Krokfors 2011, 36.
  6. 6. FUTURE OF HOUSING WHY Highlighting social background and non-measurable goals
  7. 7. EVEN THOUGH IT’S “BOTH…AND” -TIME social wellbeing and malaise technological development and return of humanity poverty and prosperity sustainable development and ever increasing emissions specialization and management of the bigger picture individuality and sense of community competition and cooperation
  8. 8. WHAT WHY Highlighting social background and non-measurable goals Presenting simple typology tools FUTURE OF HOUSING
  9. 9. WHY WHAT HOW Highlighting social background and non-measurable goals Presenting simple typology tools Illuminating the typological theme with an example FUTURE OF HOUSING
  10. 10. THE EVOLUTIONARY VIEW OF THE MAJOR WAVES OF DEVELOPMENT PRESENT AGRARIAN ERA 6000–7000 YEARS INDUSTRIAL ERA 250 YEARS INFORMATION SOCIETY 50 YEARS BIOSOCIETY 25 YEARS FUSION SOCIETY ?? YEARS GLOBALISATION GDB COMPLEXITY PACE OF CHANGE Mannermaa 2006, 6000 e.a.a. 1600 19001700 20001800 2025 2050
  11. 11. Kaivo-oja et al. 2007. agricultural societyA B agricultural society industrialization revolution 30-40 years post-industrial revolution ? years industrial society industrial society post-industrial society interaction society REVOLUTIONARY THINKING the possibilities for future innovations!
  12. 12. NEED FOR SOCIALLY SUSTAINABLE LIVING DIFFERENTIATION WILL GAIN APPRECIATION DIFFERENCES INTHE LEVEL OF INCOME ARE GROWING PROSPERITY might lead to a limited choice for people with low income. Juntto 2008, 10. In Finland, differences in living have traditionally been minor, but.... ?
  13. 13. factory MASS CUSTOMIZATION gives residents decision-making power over choices concerning their living. (resident-orientation) resident responds to the challenges presented by the shorter life cycle of lifestyles. (customization) produces more variation with reduced costs. (efficiency) Mass customization requires deep knowledge of what factors create actual added value to residents and which factors only increase the costs of living and acquisitions. Only limited ability to meet individual needs!
  14. 14. OVER THE LIMITS!
  15. 15. CHANGES IN LIVING ENVIRONMENTS REQUIRED EU GHG emissions towards an 80% domestic reduction (100% =1990) Europan comission memo 2011, 5-8. CURRENTPOLICY POWERSECTOR RESIDENTAL /TERTIARY INDUSTRY TRANSPORT NONCO2 AGRICULTURE NONCO2OTHER
  16. 16. Why we measure mainly energy consumption per cubic meter as the FLEXIBILITY IN THE LIVING ENVIRONMENT ENERGY REGULATIONS ENERGY EFFICIENCY TYPOLOGICAL FLEXIBILITY Average residential area (m2 ) of apartments new construction Statistics Finland
  17. 17. FLEXIBLEINFILLDEVELOPMENTGIVES VERSATILITYTOLIVINGALTERNATIVES New building construction in relation to the existing building stock Vainio et al. 2012, 27.
  18. 18. DIVISIBLELARGESPACE SUPPORT (BASEBUILDING) SUPPORT +INFILL
  19. 19. “OPENBUILDING” INFILLSUPPORT (BASEBUILDING) URBAN TISSUE CITY STRUCTURE In open building the built environment is approached as a constantly changing product engendered by human action, with the central features of the environment resulting from decisions made at various levels. Open building aims at a situation where decisions made on upper levels leave the contents of decisions made at lower levels open.
  20. 20. TALLI ARCHITECTS THE TILA HOUSING BLOCK, HELSINKI 2008-2010
  21. 21. pictures source: Palm 2009.!
  22. 22. SPACESTRUCTUREBASEDONROOMCELLS MULTI-PURPOSESPACES
  23. 23. TECHNICALCONVERSIONFLEXIBILITY MOVING PART WITHINTHE SPACE FOLDABLE WALL SWING DOOR TRANSFERRABLE / FIXTURE WALL
  24. 24. EDUARDO SOUTO DE MOURA APARTMENTS MAIA, PORTUGAL 2001
  25. 25. THE AMOUNT OF NEW HOUSING CONSTRUCTION Vainio ym. 2012, 12. VTT:n julkaisu:Asuntotuotanto 2030
  26. 26. A study byVTT (2012) suggests that about half a million new apartments need to be built in Finland by the year 2030. Two-thirds (67%) of the housing built between 2012 and 2030 should be built in Helsinki,Tampere ,Turku, Lahti, Jyväskylä Oulu areas. Vainio ym. 2012, 12 20, 29. Placement for housing production 2012-2030 < 1 1,0-2,5 2,5-4,5 > 4,5 VTT 2012 IN THE BACKGROUND: URBANIZATION
  27. 27. ...BUT STILL DISPERSION Continuous movement and multi-sited living enable the realization of contradicting wishes in terms of living. not have to focus itself in one area to the extent jobs do: commuting shapes living. Commuters share (%) of employed by municipality 8,4-21,5 21,6-30,2 30,3-40,6 40,7-57,2 57,23-90,0 Employment Statistics 2009 Statistics Finland
  28. 28. APPEAL OF URBAN LIVING According to various studies, the majority of Finnish people want to live in small houses. Esim. Juntto 2007. being ”Natural environment” the second most important factor of comfortable living. Asukasbarometri survey 2011, 21-22. functional possibilities levels of hierarchies a sense of belonging between the place and the resident the possibility to personalize space restorative environments the quality of home? usability territories
  29. 29. LAN ARCHITECTURE 72 COLLECTIVE HOUSING UNITS, BORDEAUX TO BE COMPLETED IN 2012 Dezeen
  30. 30. BJARKE INGELS GROUP & collaboratives JDS/JULIEN DE SMEDT ARCHITECTS MOUNTAIN DWELLINGS, COPENHAGEN 2008 Archdaily
  31. 31. NEUTELING RIEDIJK ARCHITECTS LAKE SIDE HOUSING, HUIZEN 2003 Broto 2011, 204. neutelings-riedijk.com
  32. 32. MOSHE SAFDIE HABITAT 67, MONTREAL 1967 habitat67.com mcgill.ca
  33. 33. MVRDV CELOSIA RESIDENCE, MADRID COMPLETION 2009 Ferre, Salij 2010, 278.
  34. 34. MVRDV CELOSIA RESIDENCE, MADRID COMPLETION 2009 Ferre, Salij 2010, 278.
  35. 35. DEATH / BIRTH INDEPENDENCE CHILDHOOD CAREER BEGINS FOUND A FAMILY CHILDREN INDEPENDENCE RETIREMENT 3RD AGE DECLINING OF PHYSICAL STRENGTH OUR LIFES BECOMES FRAGMENTED Kukko 2006.
  36. 36. OLDER PEOPLE SHARE OF THE FINNISH POPULATION FROM 2010 TO 2040 The Ministry of Employment 2010, 53. (OVER 65 YEARS) 2010 2020 2040 80 70-80 60-70 50-60 -50
  37. 37. CLOSER INTERACTION BETWEEN DIFFERENT GENERATIONS NEEDED According to a report by the Ministry of the Environment (2005), a common wish among the elderly in terms of living is to live at home. The physical connection between generations was broken in many places as a result of the 1970s mass migration. However, the children of these 1970s families have often remained in the same area where they spent their childhood.Therefore the future senior posterity living in the same region or town as their parents. Mikkola and Rasila 18, 2006.
  38. 38. THE SIZE OF HOUSEHOLDS DECREASES – THE NUMBER INCREASES Vainio et al 2012. LIVING ALONE 2 ADULT FAMILIES FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN Backround information: example Kukko 2006.
  39. 39. Dwellings and housing conditions Statistics 2010 Statistics Finland LIVING ALONE REQUIRES A LOT OF SPACE The average residental area (m2 ) per person per household unit size. LIVING ALONE 2 RESIDENTS IN AN APARTMENT 3 RESIDENTS IN AN APARTMENT 4 RESIDENTS IN AN APARTMENT 5 RESIDENTS IN AN APARTMENT
  40. 40. Leisure time increases......and splinters!LEASURE WORK Ylikännö 2011, 19. Hautamäki 1996. TIME MANAGEMENT CHANGE
  41. 41. EXTENDABLE AND CONTRACTIBLE HOUSING UNITS
  42. 42. TEMPORARY USE OF URBAN DEVELOPMENT Cities can turn this phenomenon into an asset of development especially now that the phenomenon can be counteracted with movable and temporary building solutions... permanent building permanent building event event TEMPORARY USE Rönkä et al 2011. Lehtovuori, Ruoppila 2011. NEED FOR MORE DENSE FINNISH CITIES RENOVATIONS IN FINNISH RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS FINNISH AREAS FREED OF EARLIER USE
  43. 43. TEMPOHOUSING KEETWONEN - STUDENT HOUSING, AMSTERDAM 2005 Rönka ym. 2011 19.
  44. 44. THE ZONING OF PRIVATE, QUASI-PUBLIC AND PUBLIC SPACES The design solutions of physical environment can affect the creation of so-called weak social bonds (acquaintances without any obligation to reciprocity, without norms or the loss of privacy). SPONTANEOUSTIME SPENTTOGETHER INTERACTION OCCURRING ALONGSIDE OTHER ACTIONS, IN EVERYDAY SITUATIONS Hasu 2009.

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