Chapter 17 ffi

3,255 views

Published on

Published in: Business
0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,255
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
31
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
313
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 17 ffi

  1. 1. Essentials of Fire Fighting 6th Edition Firefighter I Chapter 17 — Fire Control
  2. 2. Describe initial factors to consider when suppressing structure fires. Learning Objective 1 17–2
  3. 3. Selecting strategies and coordinating resources is based on three priorities. 17–3 CourtesyofBobEsposito
  4. 4. Offensive suppression strategies usually entail interior operations. 17–4
  5. 5. Defensive suppression strategies are selected based on several factors. 17–5
  6. 6. Defensive suppression strategies work to isolate or stabilize the incident. 17–6 CourtesyofChrisMickal
  7. 7. Defensive strategies are employed when certain conditions are present. 17–7
  8. 8. Strategic transitions during suppression may occur at any time. 17–8
  9. 9. Resource coordination is important during several points of fire attack. 17–9
  10. 10. Correct hoseline selection is important for fire suppression operations. 17–10 (Cont.)
  11. 11. CAUTION A hoseline no smaller than 1½-inch (38 mm) should be used on an interior fire. 17–11
  12. 12. Nozzle selection is based on several considerations found on scene. 17–12 CourtesyofRonJeffers
  13. 13. REVIEW QUESTION What initial factors must be considered when suppressing structure fires? 17–13
  14. 14. Summarize considerations taken when making entry. Learning Objective 2 17–14
  15. 15. You should know the considerations for hoseline use and placement when making entry . 17–15
  16. 16. There are several tasks every member should perform before entry. 17–16
  17. 17. You should understand what you may need to fulfill your role during entry. 17–17
  18. 18. The firefighter assigned to the nozzle should do several tasks. 17–18
  19. 19. CAUTION DO NOT open the door until you have a charged hoseline and are ready to control the conditions encountered. 17–19
  20. 20. There are several facts about making entry tactics that you should know. 17–20
  21. 21. There are several general tactics for making entry that you should know. 17–21
  22. 22. REVIEW QUESTION What are the factors that must be considered when making entry? 17–22
  23. 23. Describe direct attack, indirect attack, combination attack, and gas cooling techniques. Learning Objective 3 17–23
  24. 24. Direct attack uses water most efficiently on free-burning fires. 17–24
  25. 25. Indirect attack is used when entry is not possible due to intense heat. 17–25 CourtesyofDickGiles
  26. 26. Combination attack uses strategies from both direct and indirect attack. 17–26
  27. 27. REVIEW QUESTION How do direct attack and combination attack techniques compare with one another? 17–27
  28. 28. Gas cooling is a way of reducing heat release from the hot gas layer. 17–28
  29. 29. REVIEW QUESTION What are the main differences between indirect attack and gas cooling techniques? 17–29
  30. 30. Describe safety considerations that must be identified for upper level structure fires. Learning Objective 4 17–30
  31. 31. Fires in upper levels of structures can present unique considerations. 17–31
  32. 32. REVIEW QUESTION How does the presence or absence of a standpipe system impact upper level structure fires? 17–32
  33. 33. Explain actions taken when attacking belowground structure fires. Learning Objective 5 17–33
  34. 34. Belowground structures fires may occur in residential basements. 17–34
  35. 35. There are several factors that may contribute to basement fires. 17–35 (Cont.)
  36. 36. There are several factors may contribute to basement fires. 17–36
  37. 37. WARNING Basement fires weaken the main floor of a structure creating a constant danger of structural collapse. 17–37
  38. 38. Floor assemblies over basements may collapse before firefighters arrive. 17–38 CourtesyofNIST
  39. 39. CAUTION Thermal imagers (TI) will not always provide an accurate assessment of structural integrity of the floor system. 17–39
  40. 40. Residential basement fires can present other considerations. 17–40
  41. 41. REVIEW QUESTION What are the main actions that should be taken when attacking a belowground structure fire? 17–41
  42. 42. Belowground fires can also occur in commercial basements and subfloors. 17–42
  43. 43. REVIEW QUESTION How quickly can floor assemblies over basements reach a point of collapse? 17–43
  44. 44. Discuss methods of fire control through exposure protection and controlling building utilities. Learning Objective 6 17–44
  45. 45. Exposure protection depends on location and resources available. 17–45
  46. 46. Controlling building utilities helps control the fire and limits damage. 17–46 (Cont.)
  47. 47. DISCUSSION QUESTION Can fire department personnel remove the meter box, if necessary? 1–47
  48. 48. Controlling building utilities helps control the fire and limits damage. 17–48 (Cont.) CourtesyofRonMooreandMcKinney(TX)FD
  49. 49. WARNING Solar panels generate current whenever there is a light source (sunlight, moonlight, artificial lighting) and are always energized. 17–49
  50. 50. Controlling building utilities helps control the fire and limits damage. 17–50 (Cont.) CourtesyofRonMooreand McKinney(TX)FD
  51. 51. Controlling building utilities helps control the fire and limits damage. 17–51 (Cont.)
  52. 52. CAUTION Natural gas that leaks underground in wet soil can lose its odorant and become difficult to detect without instruments. 17–52
  53. 53. Controlling building utilities helps control the fire and limits damage. 17–53
  54. 54. REVIEW QUESTION How can using exposure protection or controlling building utilities help in fire control? 17–54
  55. 55. Describe steps taken when supporting fire protection systems at protected structures. Learning Objective 7 17–55
  56. 56. Supporting fire protection systems is accomplished through several steps. 17–56
  57. 57. REVIEW QUESTION What are the steps that must be taken when supporting a fire protection system at a protected structure? 17–57
  58. 58. Explain considerations taken when deploying, supplying, and staffing master stream devices. Learning Objective 8 17–58
  59. 59. Deploying master stream devices requires an understanding of several considerations. 17–59
  60. 60. Supplying master streams can be accomplished in several ways. 17–60
  61. 61. CAUTION Added water weight from master stream operations increases the potential for structural collapse. 17–61
  62. 62. Staffing master stream devices usually requires two firefighters. 17–62
  63. 63. Elevated master streams are used for upper stories in multistory buildings. 17–63 CourtesyofChrisMickal
  64. 64. REVIEW QUESTION How should a master stream device be properly deployed? 17–64
  65. 65. Describe situations that may require suppression of Class C fires. Learning Objective 9 17–65
  66. 66. Suppression of Class C fires requires knowledge of energized equipment. 17–66
  67. 67. WARNING Before initiating fire suppression activities, stop the flow of electricity to the device involved. 17–67
  68. 68. Class C fires may occur around delicate electronic equipment. 17–68
  69. 69. REVIEW QUESTION What situations may require suppression of a Class C fire? 17–69
  70. 70. Transmission lines and equipment can be damaged and start fires. 17–70
  71. 71. WARNING Assume that all power lines are energized until the power company informs you otherwise. 17–71
  72. 72. Fires in electrical transformers are relatively common. 17–72
  73. 73. Underground transmission lines can create explosions which require firefighters remaining a safe distance away. 17–73
  74. 74. WARNING Only personnel who are properly trained and equipped for confined space entry should enter a utility vault. 17–74
  75. 75. Commercial high-voltage installations require specific knowledge. 17–75
  76. 76. CAUTION Before cutting into walls and ceilings that may contain electrical wiring or gas piping, verify with the Incident Commander that electrical and gas utilities have been shut off. 17–76
  77. 77. Identify hazards associated with suppressing Class C fires. Learning Objective 10 17–77
  78. 78. There are several consequences of the electrical hazards that are present at Class C fires. 17–78
  79. 79. Several factors influence the seriousness of an electrical shock. 17–79
  80. 80. You should know the guidelines for electrical emergencies. 17–80 (Cont.) Establish exclusion zone
  81. 81. You should know the guidelines for electrical emergencies. 17–81 (Cont.)
  82. 82. You should know the guidelines for electrical emergencies. 17–82 (Cont.)
  83. 83. You should know the guidelines for electrical emergencies. 17–83
  84. 84. CAUTION To exit a ground gradient area, keep both feet in contact with each other and hop or shuffle out of the affected area. 17–84
  85. 85. REVIEW QUESTION What are some safety guidelines that can be used when suppressing Class C fires? 17–85
  86. 86. Describe actions associated with suppressing Class D fires. Learning Objective 11 17–86
  87. 87. Suppressing Class D fires can present unique problems. 17–87 CourtesyofNIST
  88. 88. Suppressing Class D fires requires understanding certain characteristics. 17–88
  89. 89. REVIEW QUESTION How can a Class D fire be suppressed? 17–89
  90. 90. Explain actions taken when suppressing a vehicle fire. Learning Objective 12 17–90
  91. 91. Vehicle fires are among the most common types of fires. 17–91
  92. 92. You should know vehicle incident size-up considerations. 17–92 (Cont.)
  93. 93. You should know vehicle incident size-up considerations. 17–93 (Cont.)
  94. 94. You should know vehicle incident size-up considerations. 17–94
  95. 95. Vehicle fire attack requires knowledge of several concepts. 17–95
  96. 96. Fires in different parts of the vehicle require specific procedures. 17–96 Engine or trunk compartment
  97. 97. Alternative fuel vehicles may be apparent by certain visual indicators. 17–97
  98. 98. CAUTION There may be no visual indicators that a vehicle uses an alternative fuel source. 17–98
  99. 99. There are several tactics to consider at alternative vehicle fuel fires. 17–99
  100. 100. Natural gas is used in one of two forms and has specific properties. 17–100
  101. 101. Liquefied petroleum gas is the third most common vehicle fuel type. 17–101
  102. 102. Electric alternative fuel vehicles should have visible indicators. 17–102
  103. 103. WARNING Do not cut or contact any orange, blue, or yellow color-coded electrical cables or components in electric or hybrid electric vehicles. 17–103
  104. 104. There are several other alternative fuel types that may be present. 17–104
  105. 105. REVIEW QUESTION What steps should be taken when suppressing a vehicle fire? 17–105
  106. 106. Compare methods used to suppress fires in stacked and piled materials, small unattached structures, and trash containers. Learning Objective 13 17–106
  107. 107. Stacked and piled materials present unique suppression considerations. 17–107
  108. 108. Small unattached structures are found in all jurisdictions. 17–108
  109. 109. CAUTION Chemicals used in the production of some illegal drugs are extremely toxic and volatile. Incidents involving them may require the assistance of trained hazardous materials personnel. 17–109
  110. 110. Trash container fires vary in size and create toxic combustion products. 17–110
  111. 111. REVIEW QUESTION What are the factors that influence suppression methods in stacked and piled materials, small unattached structures, and trash containers? 17–111
  112. 112. Summarize the main influences on ground cover fire behavior. Learning Objective 14 17–112
  113. 113. Ground cover fires vary in size, location, and causes. 17–113
  114. 114. WARNING Ground cover fires can be deadly to firefighters even if they are working in very light fuels or working during the overhaul phase of an operation. 17–114
  115. 115. REVIEW QUESTION What are a few of the main causes of ground cover fires? 17–115
  116. 116. Compare types of ground cover fires. Learning Objective 15 17–116
  117. 117. There are several types of ground cover fires firefighters should know. 17–117
  118. 118. REVIEW QUESTION How do surface fires and crown fires compare with ground fires? 17–118
  119. 119. Describe elements that influence ground cover fire behavior. Learning Objective 16 17–119
  120. 120. Ground cover fire behavior is influenced by fuel and its characteristics. 17–120
  121. 121. Ground cover fire behavior is affected by certain weather factors. 17–121
  122. 122. Ground cover fire behavior is influenced by topography. 17–122
  123. 123. REVIEW QUESTIONS What three elements influence ground cover fire behavior? 17–123
  124. 124. Identify the parts of a ground cover fire. Learning Objective 17 17–124
  125. 125. Firefighters should be able to identify parts of a ground cover fire. 17–125
  126. 126. REVIEW QUESTION What are the parts of a typical ground cover fire? 17–126
  127. 127. Describe protective clothing and equipment used in fighting ground cover fires. Learning Objective 18 17–127
  128. 128. Wildland protective clothing and equipment is different from standard structural turnout clothing. 17–128
  129. 129. REVIEW QUESTION What types of protective clothing and equipment can be used when fighting ground cover fires? 17–129
  130. 130. Describe methods used to attack ground cover fires. Learning Objective 19 17–130
  131. 131. Ground cover fires may be attacked directly or indirectly. 17–131 CourtesyofNationalInteragencyFireCenter
  132. 132. REVIEW QUESTION How do direct attack and indirect attack methods for ground fires compare with one another? 17–132
  133. 133. Summarize safety principles and practices when fighting ground cover fires. Learning Objective 20 17–133
  134. 134. Size-up information at ground cover fires includes several categories. 17–134
  135. 135. The LECS concept can help situational awareness be more effective. 17–135
  136. 136. The ten standard fire fighting orders can also be used at ground cover fires. 17–136 (Cont.)
  137. 137. The ten standard fire fighting orders can also be used at ground cover fires. 17–137
  138. 138. There are other non-fire hazards you should be aware of as well. 17–138 (Cont.)
  139. 139. There are other non-fire hazards you should be aware of as well. 17–139
  140. 140. REVIEW QUESTION What safety principles and practices should firefighters use when fighting ground cover fires? 17–140
  141. 141. • Attacking fires early in development is an important aspect of a successful fire fighting operation. In addition, selecting and applying the most effective fire attack strategy and tactics are also important. Summary 17–141 (Cont.)
  142. 142. • Failing to do any of these things can result in a fire growing out of control, an increase in fire damage and loss, and possibly in firefighter injuries. • Firefighters need to know how to safely and effectively attack and extinguish fires involving structures, vehicles, stacked and piled materials, and ground cover. Summary 17–142
  143. 143. Attack a structure fire using a direct, indirect, or combination attack. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-1. Learning Objective 21 17–143
  144. 144. Attack a structure fire above, below, and at ground level – Interior attack. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-2. Learning Objective 22 17–144
  145. 145. Turn off building utilities. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-3. Learning Objective 23 17–145
  146. 146. Connect supply fire hose to a fire department connection. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-4. Learning Objective 24 17–146
  147. 147. Operate a sprinkler system control valve. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-5. Learning Objective 25 17–147
  148. 148. Stop the flow of water of an activated sprinkler. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-6. Learning Objective 26 17–148
  149. 149. Deploy and operate a portable master stream device. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-7. Learning Objective 27 17–149
  150. 150. Attack a passenger vehicle fire. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-8. Learning Objective 28 17–150
  151. 151. Attack a fire in stacked or piled materials. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-9. Learning Objective 29 17–151
  152. 152. Attack a fire in a small unattached structure. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-10. Learning Objective 30 17–152
  153. 153. Extinguish a fire in a trash container. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-11. Learning Objective 31 17–153
  154. 154. Attack a ground cover fire. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 17-I-12. Learning Objective 32 17–154

×