Chapter 11 ffi

2,789 views

Published on

0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,789
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
30
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
410
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 11 ffi

  1. 1. Essentials of Fire Fighting 6th Edition Firefighter I Chapter 11 — Forcible Entry
  2. 2. Explain the basic principles of forcible entry. Learning Objective 1 11–2
  3. 3. Forcible entry has two outcomes when performed properly. 11–3
  4. 4. Forcible entry can be applied to other situations and always requires effective size-up and situational awareness. 11–4 CourtesyofRichMahaney
  5. 5. The supervisor or IC must weigh several factors to determine entry point. 11–5
  6. 6. Firefighters should never force entry without order to do so. 11–6
  7. 7. DISCUSSION QUESTION What is meant by “Try before you pry”? 11–7
  8. 8. After trying normal entry, look for lock boxes near the main entrance. 11–8
  9. 9. The general considerations for forcible entry include three areas. 11–9
  10. 10. Security barriers require specialized training, tools, and knowledge to force. 11–10 CourtesyofLosAngelesFireDepartment-ISTS
  11. 11. REVIEW QUESTION What are the basic principles of forcible entry? 11–11
  12. 12. Describe the basic construction of locksets. Learning Objective 2 11–12
  13. 13. The term “lockset” describes all types of door latches, locks, and locking devices. 11–13
  14. 14. Door locks and latches can be found on all exterior and many interior doors. 11–14
  15. 15. Mortise locks are mounted into a cavity in the door’s edge and the door jamb. 11–15
  16. 16. Cylindrical locks are the most common lockset and are installed by boring two holes at right angles to each other. 11–16
  17. 17. Cylindrical locks are divided into two types. 11–17
  18. 18. The easiest way to breach modern dead bolts in a wood residential door is to force the door itself. 11–18 CourtesyofRichMahaney
  19. 19. Rim locks are mounted on the interior door surface and are used to supplement doors with or without locks. 11–19
  20. 20. High-security locks come in a variety of forms and functions. 11–20
  21. 21. Other locking devices may supplement a door lock or be used in place of a lock. 11–21
  22. 22. Padlocks are portable or detachable locking devices and are divided into two types. 11–22
  23. 23. Other locking devices firefighters may encounter include the following. 11–23
  24. 24. REVIEW QUESTION What types of locksets may firefighters encounter during forcible entry operations? 11–24
  25. 25. Describe considerations a firefighter must take when using forcible entry tools. Learning Objective 3 11–25
  26. 26. CAUTION! Always wear appropriate PPE when using forcible entry tools. 11–26
  27. 27. Follow these general considerations when using cutting tools. 11–27
  28. 28. Axes are the most common type of cutting tool in firefighting and have a wide variety of uses. 11–28
  29. 29. Metal cutting devices are used to cut through several types of obstacles in a variety of ways. 11–29
  30. 30. Power saws can be powered in a number of ways and must always be used safely. 11–30
  31. 31. CAUTION! • Wear eye, hearing, and hand protection when operating any power saw. • Never force a power saw beyond its design limits. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. • Do not use a power saw in a flammable atmosphere. 11–31
  32. 32. Electrical or battery-powered circular saws are used in fire fighting, rescue and overhaul operations. 11–32
  33. 33. Rotary saws have interchangeable blades that can produce sparks when used on certain surfaces. 11–33
  34. 34. CAUTION! Sparks from cutting operations can cause additional fires. Have a charged hoseline or portable fire extinguisher close at hand during cutting. 11–34
  35. 35. WARNING! Never use a rotary saw to cut the shell of any storage tank that might contain flammable vapors. 11–35
  36. 36. CAUTION! The blade guards on some rotary saws are not designed for use with carbide- tipped blades. Be sure that the saw is designed for the blades used. 11–36
  37. 37. Reciprocating saws and chain saws both have advantages in specific circumstances. 11–37
  38. 38. Prying tools help open doors, windows, locks, and move heavy objects by providing mechanical advantage. 11–38
  39. 39. Manual prying tools are usually constructed from a single-piece of high- carbon steel 30-36 inches (762-900 mm). 11–39
  40. 40. Hydraulic prying tools come in different forms; manual hydraulic tools have specific benefits and drawbacks. 11–40 Manually powered
  41. 41. Rescue tools and hydraulic door openers can be used effectively for forcible entry. 11–41
  42. 42. Pushing/pulling tools have limited uses for forcible entry, but can break glass and open walls or ceilings. 11–42
  43. 43. Striking tools are basic hand tools with a weighted head attached to a handle. 11–43
  44. 44. Forcible entry tools must be used in combination because no single tool can handle every situation. 11–44
  45. 45. DISCUSSION QUESTION What is the most important factor to consider before performing forcible entry? 1–45
  46. 46. Keep in mind the following safety guidelines when working with forcible entry tools. 11–46 (Cont.)
  47. 47. Keep in mind the following safety guidelines when working with forcible entry tools. 11–47 (Cont.)
  48. 48. Keep in mind the following safety guidelines when working with forcible entry tools. 11–48
  49. 49. Use extreme care when operating rotary, power, and chain saws to prevent injury. 11–49 (Cont.)
  50. 50. Use extreme care when operating rotary, power, and chain saws to prevent injury. 11–50 (Cont.)
  51. 51. Use extreme care when operating rotary, power, and chain saws to prevent injury. 11–51
  52. 52. REVIEW QUESTION What are some basic tool safety tips firefighters should follow during forcible entry operations? 11–52
  53. 53. Protect yourself and others when carrying tools, and get help transporting heavy tools. 11–53
  54. 54. Indicate steps needed to care for and maintain forcible entry tools. Learning Objective 4 11–54
  55. 55. Forcible entry tools must be maintained properly so they function safely and effectively. 11–55
  56. 56. Refer to manufacturer’s guidelines and department procedures to report damaged tools and remove them from service. 11–56
  57. 57. REVIEW QUESTION Who cares for and performs maintenance on forcible entry tools? 11–57
  58. 58. Explain the ways to force entry through various types of doors. Learning Objective 5 11–58
  59. 59. Identify considerations that need to be taken when forcing entry through locks, padlocks, overhead doors, and fire doors. Learning Objective 6 11–59
  60. 60. Begin forced entry through a door only after size up and with minimum damage. 11–60
  61. 61. Breaking door glass is often the best option when forcing entry. 11–61
  62. 62. Look for the placement of the hinges when forcing swing doors. 11–62 Direction of Entry Hinge on inside Hinge on outside Inward-swinging Outward-swinging
  63. 63. Double-swinging doors and doors with drop bars present unique challenges during forcible entry. 11–63
  64. 64. Forcing entry through a tempered plate glass door has many drawbacks, but may be used as a last resort. 11–64 Glass should be shielded when broken
  65. 65. Determine the method for forcing sliding doors or security doors/gates by identifying the type. 11–65
  66. 66. Through-the-lock entry requires good size-up of the door and lock, and can be accomplished with several tools. 11–66
  67. 67. Forcing padlocks can be accomplished using several methods and tools. 11–67
  68. 68. Use a rotary saw to force entry on an overhead door. 11–68
  69. 69. WARNING! All overhead doors should be blocked in the up or open position to prevent injury to firefighters if the built-in control device fails. 11–69
  70. 70. Fire doors are usually found inside the structure and should be blocked open after forcible entry as a precaution. 11–70 Closed doors can cut off hoselines
  71. 71. DISCUSSION QUESTION Where are fire doors generally encountered in a structure? 1–71
  72. 72. REVIEW QUESTION How do the considerations that must be taken when forcing entry through swinging and sliding doors compare? 11–72
  73. 73. Describe forcible entry methods used for windows. Learning Objective 7 11–73
  74. 74. Explain considerations firefighters must take when forcing entry through miscellaneous types of windows and covers Learning Objective 8 11–74
  75. 75. Forcible entry through windows can be easy, but may create further hazards. 11–75
  76. 76. Breaking window glass is a common entry method, but several factors must be considered. 11–76
  77. 77. Forcing entry by breaking fixed windows should be done only as a last resort. 11–77
  78. 78. Double-hung windows have two sashes and a locking mechanism on the inside. 11–78
  79. 79. Forcing entry on other types of windows depends on their design. 11–79 (Cont.)
  80. 80. REVIEW QUESTION How does the process for forcing entry through fixed windows compare to forcing entry through awning windows? 11–80
  81. 81. Forcing entry on other types of windows depends on their design. 11–81 (Cont.)
  82. 82. Forcing entry on other types of windows depends on their design. 11–82 (Cont.) CourtesyofFloridaStateFireCollege
  83. 83. Forcing entry on other types of windows depends on their design. 11–83 (Cont.) Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Windows
  84. 84. Forcing entry on other types of windows depends on their design. 11–84
  85. 85. REVIEW QUESTION What dangers may be present when forcing entry through miscellaneous types of windows and covers? 11–85
  86. 86. Describe forcible entry methods for breaching walls. Learning Objective 9 11–86
  87. 87. Breaching walls requires meeting certain criteria before attempting. 11–87
  88. 88. Breaching exterior walls poses hazards such as structural collapse and concealed utilities. 11–88
  89. 89. DISCUSSION QUESTION When should a concrete wall be breached? 1–89
  90. 90. Interior walls also conceal utilities and can be either load-bearing or non-load-bearing. 11–90
  91. 91. REVIEW QUESTION How do forcible entry operations for exterior walls compare to those for interior walls? 11–91
  92. 92. Explain forcible entry methods for breaching floors. Learning Objective 10 11–92
  93. 93. Breaching floors may be done for several reasons and methods vary by how a floor is constructed. 11–93
  94. 94. A variety of cutting tools are used to breach wooden floors. 11–94
  95. 95. Breaching concrete floors presents more difficulties and requires different cutting tools. 11–95 Using jackhammers or “stitch drilling” can open floors rapidly
  96. 96. REVIEW QUESTION What does the feasibility of opening a floor during a fire fighting operation depend on? 11–96
  97. 97. Indicate methods for forcing fences and gates. Learning Objective 11 11–97
  98. 98. A wide variety of fencing materials can pose a number of hazards when forcing. 11–98
  99. 99. Wire and other types of fences can be forced with cutting tools. 11–99
  100. 100. CAUTION • Wire will recoil in the direction of the next post on the fence when it is cut. • Cutting electrified fences before deenergizing the fence may result in electric shock. 11–100
  101. 101. Going over some types of fences may be easier than going through them. 11–101
  102. 102. Security gates may have lock boxes, electronic locks, padlocks, or they may be monitored by staff. 11–102
  103. 103. REVIEW QUESTION What techniques can be used to force entry through fences or gates? 11–103
  104. 104. • When normal means of entry is locked or blocked, forcible entry techniques are used to gain access into a structure or area. • Forcible entry efforts can do minimal damage to a structure or structural components and provide quick access. Summary 11–104 (Cont.)
  105. 105. • Tools and techniques are used to breach walls and floors to advance hoselines, apply extinguishing agents, access trapped victims, or ventilate an area. Summary 11–105
  106. 106. Clean, inspect, and maintain hand tools and equipment. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-1. Learning Objective 12 11–106
  107. 107. Clean, inspect, and maintain power tools and equipment. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-2. Learning Objective 13 11–107
  108. 108. Force entry through an inward- swinging door – Two-firefighter method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-3. Learning Objective 14 11–108
  109. 109. Force entry through an inward- swinging door – Cutting the lock out of the door method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-4. Learning Objective 15 11–109
  110. 110. Force entry through an outward- swinging door – Removing hinge-pins method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-5. Learning Objective 16 11–110
  111. 111. Force entry though an outward- swinging door – Wedge-end method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-6. Learning Objective 17 11–111
  112. 112. Force entry using the through-the-lock method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-7. Learning Objective 18 11–112
  113. 113. Force entry using the through-the-lock method using the K-tool. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-8. Learning Objective 19 11–113
  114. 114. Force entry using the through-the-lock method using the A-tool. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-9. Learning Objective 20 11–114
  115. 115. Force entry through padlocks. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-10. Learning Objective 21 11–115
  116. 116. Use a bam-bam tool. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-11. Learning Objective 22 11–116
  117. 117. Cut a padlock with a rotary saw. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-12. Learning Objective 23 11–117
  118. 118. Force entry through a window (glass pane). This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-13. Learning Objective 24 11–118
  119. 119. Force entry through a double-hung window. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-14. Learning Objective 25 11–119
  120. 120. Force a Lexan® window using a rotary saw. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-15. Learning Objective 26 11–120
  121. 121. Force entry through a wood-framed wall (Type V construction) with hand tools. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-16. Learning Objective 27 11–121
  122. 122. Force entry through a wood wall (Type V construction) with a rotary saw or chain saw. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-17. Learning Objective 28 11–122
  123. 123. Breach a wall using a battering ram. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-18. Learning Objective 29 11–123
  124. 124. Force entry through a masonry wall with hand tools. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-19. Learning Objective 30 11–124
  125. 125. Force entry through a metal wall with power tools. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-20. Learning Objective 31 11–125
  126. 126. Breach a hardwood floor. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-21. Learning Objective 32 11–126
  127. 127. Bridge a fence with a ladder. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 11-I-22. Learning Objective 33 11–127

×