CCM
I...
INFORMANTS

NM
 ‐
Government,
Principal
Recipient
NF
    ‐
Development
Partner
TT
    ‐
CCM
Executive
Secretary,
CSO
–
Fai...
A.
COUNTRY’S
INFORMATION

Table
01:
Grant,
start
date,
and
amount
Component
            Approved
            Grant
Agreeme...
Table
03:

Global
Fund
Grants
and
PR

  Phase
             Grants/PR
                            Starting
         Approve...
A.1.
Proposal
rejected.
Were
these
decision(s)
ever
appealed?
Were
any
proposals
re‐submitted
and
what
was
the
outcome?

R...
Table
05
:
CCM
Civil
Society
Members
No
      Name
                                   Sex
    Institution
      1. Dr.
Ach...
YKB
(Yayasan
Kusuma
Buana),
who
will
assist
with
the
organization
of
the
selection
process.


B.
2.
Most
Effective
work
of...
There
were
diffeterent
types
of
meetings.
Regular
meetings
may
be
conducted
by
different
segment
(disease)
of
CCM,
but
it
...
government
and
development
partners.
Therfore,
their
affiliation
with
their
constituents
is
questionable
and
how
they
prep...
is
observed
and
resolved
well.

For
example,
Dr.
Nafsiah
Mboi,
the
Secretary
of
NAC,
who
were
previously
member
of
TWG
&
C...
manual
and
painfully
experience
from
2007
has
made
current
CCM
more
proactive
and
accountable.
However,
one
member
complai...

E.2.
Grant
monitoring

With
the
appointment
of
Indonesian
Planned
Parenthood
and
Nahdatul
Ulama,
it
is
demonstrated
that
...
to
CCM
was
by
government
appoinment.
Currently
is
is
possible
and
very
much
encouraged
to
nominate
members
and
alternate
m...


E.7.
Developing
a
shared
strategic
agenda
with
CSO
representatives
on
CCM


One
informants
describe
the
situation
as
fol...
transparent
mechanism
to
ensure
trust
and
support.
Considering
that
Indonesia
is
a
large
country
and
government
policies
a...

­
By
other
stakeholders
on
CCM
(governments,
UN
agencies,
donors)
        
Government
colleagues
and
UN
agencies/donors
a...
Newsletter,
website,
database,
and
effective
secretariat
should
be
there
to
support
dialogue
and
consultation
of
CS
and
th...
or
global
alliances
or
networks
of
CSO
organizations
(such
as
                ICASO,
ITPC,
etc.)
for
technical
inputs
or
f...
ATTACHMENTS
Attachment (1)Source: JOTHI (Download: http://www.jothi.or.id/?q=CCM/Ind/4 -- January 21, 2010)
              ...
Attachmnet (2)Technical
Working
Groups
(TWG)11

Purpose
and
Objectives
Technical
Working
Groups
are
permanent
bodies
that
...
recommend
 to
 the
 CCM
 that
 the
 matter
 be
 followed
 up
 by
 the
 Oversight
    Committee.

    g.



To
report
all
r...


Committee
 activities
 shall
 be
 funded
 from
 the
 CCM’s
 operational
 budget
 and
other
eligible
sources.




       ...
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CCMI Final

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CCMI Final

  1. 1. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 CCM
II
Advocacy
Project
 (Indonesia)
 
 
 Final
report
 
 
 
 
 
 Team:
 
 Irwanto
 Laura
Milete
 Aditya
Wardhana
 Hoshael
Erlan
 
 
 
 
 December
4,
2009



 0

  2. 2. INFORMANTS

NM
 ‐
Government,
Principal
Recipient
NF
 ‐
Development
Partner
TT
 ‐
CCM
Executive
Secretary,
CSO
–
Faith
Based
Organizaion
DM
 ‐
CSO,
HIV&AIDS
DH
 ‐
CSO,
PLWD
–
TB
FL
 ‐
CSO,
HIV&AIDS
AW
 ‐
CSO,
Affected
Communities
(non‐CCM
member)
JM
 ‐
CSO,
Principal
Recipient
VK
 ‐
CSO,
HIV&AIDS
(non‐CCM
member)


To
these
informants
we
would
like
to
express
our
heartfelt
gratitude.


 1

  3. 3. A.
COUNTRY’S
INFORMATION

Table
01:
Grant,
start
date,
and
amount
Component
 Approved
 Grant
Agreement
 Absorption
 Amount
(USD)
 Signed
(USD)
 (USD)
AIDS
 
 
 
Round
1
(2002)
 12.500.000,00
 7.829.764,00
 5.714.668,00
Round
4(2004)
 64.997.530,00
 49.770.466,00
 29.949.528,00
Round
8
(2008)
 130.659.680,00
 45.384.545,00
Ph
1
TB
 
 
 
Round
1
(2002)
 70.600.000,00
 68.663.564,00
 51.125.056,00
Round
5
(2005)
 69.100.000,00
 49.978.433,00
 17.136.030,00

 
 18.314.685,00
Ph
1

 
 31.663.748,00
Ph
2
Round
8
(2008)
 93,001,058.00
 28.106.251,00
Ph
1
Malaria

 
 
 
 21.231.148,00
Round
1
(2002)
 43.960.800,00
 23.704.947,00
 17.100.276,00
Round
6
(2006)
 57.970.100,00
 57.970.100,00

 
 27.683.015,00
Ph
1

 
 30.282.085,00
Ph
2
Round
8
(2008)
 120.092.536,00
 108.255.452,00
Ph
1

Table
02
:
Global
Fund’s
‘rating’
of
the
most
recent
3
disbursements
to
the
country:
AIDS
(Round
4):
2008:

1
January‐31
March:
B1

 1
April‐30
June:
A2

 1
July‐30
September:
A2
2009:

1
October‐31
March:
A1
TB
(Round
5):
2007:

1
January‐30
June:
B2

 1
July‐31
December:
C
2008:
 1
January‐30
June:
B2

 1
July‐31
December:
B1
Malaria
(Round
6):
2008:

1
March‐31
May:
A1

 1
June‐31
August:
A2
2009:
 1
September‐28
February:
B1


 2

  4. 4. Table
03:

Global
Fund
Grants
and
PR

 Phase
 Grants/PR
 Starting
 Approved
 Program
 Funding
(USD)
 Round
1

 HIV
/
Directorate
of
Directly
 01
July
2003
 5,400,174.00
 Transmitted
Disease
Control
of
the
 Ministry
of
Health
of
the
Government
 of
The
Republic
of
Indonesia
 
 Malaria
/
Directorate
of
Vector
Borne
 01
July
2003
 8,254,947
 Disease
Control
of
the
Ministry
of
 Health
of
the
Republic
of
Indonesia
 
 TB
/
Directorate
of
Directly
 01
August
2003
 Phase
1:
 Transmitted
Disease
Control
of
the
 21,612,265.00

 Ministry
of
Health
of
the
Government
 Phase
2
:
 of
The
Republic
of
Indonesia
 30,153,758.00
 Round
4
 HIV
/
Directorate
of
Directly
 01
April
2005
 41,534,594.00
 Transmitted
Disease
Control
of
the
 Ministry
of
Health
of
the
Government
 of
The
Republic
of
Indonesia
 Round
5
 TB
/
Directorate
of
Directly
 01
January
2007
 Phase
1:
 Transmitted
Disease
Control,
 18,314,685.00

 Ministry
of
Health
 Phase
2
:
 31,663,748.00
 Round
6
 Malaria
/
Directorate
General
of
 01
March
2008
 27,683,015
 Disease
Control
and
Environmental
 Health
of
The
Ministry
of
Health
of
 The
Republic
of
Indonesia
 Round
8
 HIV
‐
Directorate
General
of
Disease
 01
July
2009
 26,719,418.00
 Control
and
Environmental
Health
of
 The
Ministry
of
Health
of
The
 Republic
of
Indonesia
 
 HIV‐
National
AIDS
Commission
of
 01
July
2009
 8,131,421.00
 Indonesia
 
 HIV
–
Indonesia
Planned
Parenthood
 01‐July‐2009
 4,970,867.00
 Association
(IPPA)
 
 TB
/
Faculty
of
Public
Health,
 01‐ 6,200,769.00
 University
of
Indonesia
 September2009
 
 TB
/
Directorate
General
of
Disease
 01
 12,113,706.00
 Control
and
Environmental
Health
of
 September2009
 The
Ministry
of
Health
of
The
 Republic
of
Indonesia
 
 TB
/
Central
Board
of
Aisyiyah
 01
July
2009
 5,816,935.00
 
 Malaria
/
PERDHAKI
 01
January
2010
 9,259,404.00
 
 Malaria
/
Directorate
of
Vector
Borne
 01
January
2010
 54,226,746.00
 Disease
Control
of
the
Ministry
of
 Health
of
the
Republic
of
Indonesia



 3

  5. 5. A.1.
Proposal
rejected.
Were
these
decision(s)
ever
appealed?
Were
any
proposals
re‐submitted
and
what
was
the
outcome?

Round
5,
6
and
7
Indonesian
proposals
were
rejected.
No
re‐appeal.
They
wrote
proposal
for
Round
8
and
9
and
they
were
very
successful.

B.
CURRENT
CCM
LEADERSHIP
AND
CIVIL
SOCIETY
CCM
MEMBERS

When
the
CCM
membership
was
recruited
and
appointed
with
a
decree
from
MoH
in
20051,
coalition
or
networks
of
key
affected
population
was
not
yet
established.
HIV
coalition
in
the
country
were
represented
by
an

NGO
Forum
and
the
Indonesian
AIDS
Society
at
national
and
provincial
levels.
These
were
active
coalitions
but
did
not
necessarily
represent
key
affected
populaion.
One
member
of
the
NGO
Coalition,
Spiritia
Foundation,

was
appointed
as
a
member
of
CCM
to
represent
people
living
with
HIV&AIDS
(see
Table
05).

Among
the
leadership
of
CCM,
we
may
find
a
CSO
member
appointed
as
the
executive
secretary
(see

Table
04
below
also)2.



Table
04:

CCM
Leadership

No
 Name
 Position
 Institution
 1. 
Dr.
Arum
 Chair
of
CCM

 Bappenas
(National
 Atmawikarta
 Development
Planning
 Agency)
 2. 
Dr.
Broto
Wasisto
 Chair
of
CCM
 Committee
for
 Oversight
Committee
 Prevention
&
Control
 of
Narcotics
&
Drugs
 3. 
Dr.
Tine
Tombokan
 CCM
Executive
 PGI
(Communion
of
 Secretary
 Churches)
 4. 
Dr.
Sudiyanto
Kamso
 Vice
Chair
for
CCM
 IAKMI
(Indonesian
 Civil
Society
 Public
Health
 Association)

As
indicated
in
Table
05
below,
most
CS
members
were
recruited
from
practicing
medical
communities
based
in
religious
institutions,
(semi)
government
community
based
program,
and
from
the
academic
institutions.
The
list
does
show
membership
of
those
representing
people
living
with
the
disease
(especially
HIV&AIDS)
and
a
representative
of
the
business
coalition.


























































1
Extended
every
2
years
2
Current
composition:
16
CSO,
16
Government,
7
Development
Partners

 4

  6. 6. Table
05
:
CCM
Civil
Society
Members
No
 Name
 Sex
 Institution
 1. Dr.
Achmad
Hudoyo
(Member)
 
 M
 Indonesian
Tuberculosis
 Dr.
Henry
Diatmo
(Alternate)
 M
 Control
Association
 2. Dr.
Atikah
M.
Zaki
(Member)
 
 F
 Muhammadiyah
–
 Muhsin
Alwi,
MPH
(Alternate)
 M
 Aisyiyah
 3. Dr.
Broto
Wasisto
(Member)
 
 M
 Committee
for
 Prevention
&
Control
of
 Narcotics
&
Drugs
 4. Daniel
Marguari
(Member)
 
 M
 Spiritia
Foundation
 Meirinda
(Alternate)
 F
 5. Dhayan
Dirgantara
(Member)
 
 M
 Community
 Putu
Utama
Dewi
(Alternate)
 F
 representative
from
 People
living
with
HIV
 6. Dr.
Doddy
Partomihardjo
(Member)
 
 M
 Yayasan
Bangun
 Dr.
Sumengen
Sutomo
(Alternate)
 M
 Indonesia

 7. Edy
Haryanto
(Member)
 
 M
 Community
 Den
Mas
Agung
(Alternate)
 M
 representative
from
 People
living
with
HIV
 8. Dr.
Firman
Lubis
(Member)
 
 M
 Coalition
for
Healthy
 Dr.
Kartono
Muhammad
(Alternate)
 M
 Indonesia
(KUIS)
 9. Dr.
Ratna
Farida
(Member)
 
 F
 Central
PKK
 Endang
Hariyanto
(Alternate)
 F
 10. Nina
Tursinah
(Member)
 
 F
 Indonesian
Businessmen
 Dr.
Haryono
(Alternate)
 F
 Association
(APINDO)
 11. Dr.
Syahrizal
Syarief
(Member)
 
 M
 Nadlatul
Ulama
 Dr.
Wen
Nedra
(Alternate)
 F
 12. Dr.
Sudarto
Ronoatmodjo
(Member)
 
 M
 Indonesian
Medical
 Dr.
Pandu
Riono
(Alternate)
 M
 Doctor
Association
 13. Dr.
Sudiyanto
Kamso
(Member)
 
 M
 Indonesian
Public
Health
 Dr.
Ratna
Djuwita
(Alternate)
 F
 Association
(IAKMI)
 14. Dr.
Tine
A.A.
Tombokan
(Member)
 
 F
 Community
of
Churches
 Gomar
Gultom
(Alternate)
 M
 in
Indonesia
(PGI)
 15. Dr.
Thomas
Suroso
(Member)
 
 M
 Indonesian
Parasite
 Dr.
Supratman
Sukowati
(Alternate)
 M
 Control
Association
 (PPPI)
 16. Dr.
Retnowati
WD
Tuti
 
 F
 Cured
TB
Disease
 Representative

B.1.
Who
organizes
and
finances
the
selection/election
process
for
civil
society
members
of
the
CCM?

The
current
selection
process
of
civil
society
members
of
the
CCM
is
being
organized
by
the
Vice
Chair
for
civil
society
on
the
CCM,
along
with
the
CCM
Secretariat.

UNAIDS
Indonesia
has
offered
to
support
the
meeting
costs
for
the
selection
process
of
civil
society
members.
An
LOA
will
be
signed
between
UNAIDS
and

 5

  7. 7. YKB
(Yayasan
Kusuma
Buana),
who
will
assist
with
the
organization
of
the
selection
process.


B.
2.
Most
Effective
work
of
current
CCM

From
a
very
limited
observation,
it
seems
agreeable
that
current
CCM
has
improved
considerably
in
administrative
and
technical
capacity,
although
may
not
satisfy
all
members.
One
informant
indicated
that
2007
incident,
when
the
disbursement
of
GFATM
round
4
grants
was
partially
stopped
due
to
mis‐management,
was
“a
blessing
in
disguise…..­

where
current
CCM
learned
to
be
prudent,
more
transparent
and,
accountable….”
(NM).

The
fact
that
current
CCM
was
successful
for
Round
8
and
9
should
be
attruibuted
to
more
participation
of
key
stakeholders,
especially
civil
society
members
in
the
technical
working
group
(TWG),
in
writing
winning
proposals
(see
E.1.).
Informants
also
suggest
that
the
CCM
Governance
Manual
was
improved,
relationship
between
PRs
and
development
partners,
especially
with
and
among
the
oversight
team
was
much
better,
and
access
for
participants
outside
of
Jakarta
to
contribute
ideas
was
significantly
better.

In
fact,
currently
CCM
has
a
small
fund
to
run
an
office
that
employs
two
administrative
secretaries.
This
fund
is
utilized
to
serve
CCM
secretariat
only.
This
is
partly
due
to
the
contribution
of
NAC
and
UNAIDS
and
partly
to
having
the
experience
of
resolving
challenges.



C.
INVOLVEMENT
OF
CIVIL
SOCIETY
IN
CCM

C.1.
CCM
Meeting

In
the
governance
manual,
CCM
should
meet
at
least
once
every
3
months
or
four
times
annually.
Meeting
is
organized
regularly,
sometimes
monthly
when
necessary
(especially
the
TWG3).
Meetings
are
necessary
especially
in
the
early
stage
of
CCM
when
not
every
member
understood
what
CCM
was
and
their
responsibilities.
Meeting
agenda
was
prepared
and
circulated
in
advance.
Especially
now
that
it
has
an
office
space
and
administrative
assistance.
Members
are
allowed
to
add
item
on
the
agenda
when
the
agenda
was
read
at
the
opening
of
the
meeting
and
before
closing
(on
“other
business
matters”).
It
was
noted
,
however,
that
in
earlier
days
when
the
PRs
were
only
government
and
there
was
no
fund
for
a
secretariat,
meetings
were
not
as
efficient
as
at
present
(2008
onward)
when
CSOs
are
allowed
to
be
PRs
and
a
secreteriat
office
is
running.
Still,
some
members
felt
that
notification
for
meetings
were
many
times
too
short,
agenda
sometimes
too
thick.


























































3
TWG
–
see
attachment
(2)
–
current
Chair
is
Dr.
Nafsiah
Mboi,
MD
(Pediatrician),
MPH
–
Secretary
of
NAC.
She
resigned
to
avoid
conflict
of
interst.
No
substitute
has
been
elected.
Mr.
Daniel
Marguari
of
the
Spiritia
Foundation
and
Prof
Firman
Lubis
of
Kusuma
Buana
Foundation
represent
CS
membership
in
TWG.
Current
Chair
of
Oversight
Committee
is
Dr.
Broto
Wasisto

 6

  8. 8. There
were
diffeterent
types
of
meetings.
Regular
meetings
may
be
conducted
by
different
segment
(disease)
of
CCM,
but
it
has
oversight
and
plenary
meetings
where
every
member
must
attend.
CCM
even
has
an
extra
ordinary
meeting
when
urgent
matters
need
speedy
overight
and
decision.

For
plenary
meeting,
a
number
of
members
noted
that
there
were
often
serious
lacks
of
attendance,
especially
from
government
members.
Many
times
it
was
difficult
to
make
decisions
due
to
failure
of
achieving
quorum
(2/3
of
total
members).


In
the
plenary
meeting,
observers
were
allowed
to
attend
with
prior
notice.

Those
allowed
are
relevant
with
the
themes
and
need
for
the
meeting.
Prior
notice
is
sent
through
available
mailist
and
anyone
interested
to
come
could
send
an
e‐mail
to
get
permission
to
join
the
meeting.
There
is
no
specific
invitation
for
CSO.

This
complies
with
the
new
governance
manual.
During
meeting,
however,
they
are
not
allowed
to
be
directly
involved
in
the
decision
making
process,
all
concerns
and
ideas
should
be
channelled
through
their
representative
members
who
has
the
right
to
speak.
The
problem
is,
according
to
obersvers,
meeting
schedules
were
not
well
circulated
and
too
often,
meetings
were
closed
for
observers.

Are
notes
and
decisions
made
available
to
the
public?
Website
is
still
under
construction.
Therefore,
they
were
not
publicly
circulated.
Notes
and
decisions
were
circulated
among
members
through
e‐mails.
The
public
may
inquire
and
get
notes
and
decisions
from
their
representatives.

All
informants
agree
that
the
website
is
critical
to
inform
the
public
although
no
rules
and
regulations
have
been
discussed.
One
informant
said,
for
example,
that
if
the
website
is
only
published
in
English,
the
impacts
will
be
very
limited.
Currently
JOTHI
–
an
APN+
network
member,
published
CCM
information
in
Bahasa
Indonesia4.
Unfortunately,
the
constuction
of
the
information
is
not
yet
finished
(as
per
21
January
2010).

Since
2008,
CCM
Indonesia
received
very
small
GF
financial
assistance
(US$
43
thousands)
to
run
CCM
Secretariat,
construct
a
website,
and
pay
for
limited
number
of
visitation
to
the
provinces.
Visitation
in
the
provinces
is
a
coordinated
activity
by
CCM
to
achieve
an
agreed
general
objective
and
not
to
serve
individual
member
of
CCM.
The
real
need,
according
to
a
member,
is
US$
244
thousands5.
CCM
members
should
contribute
to
fill
the
gap.
CS
members
are
not
allowed
to
use
the
fund
to
strengthen
their
participation
at
CCM.

External
funding
is
used
for
this
purpose.

Do
civil
society
members
of
the
CCM
prepare
for
CCM
meetings
in
advance?
In
principle,
they
do.
They
are
allowed
to
raise
issues
and
demand
clarification.
They
may
submit
their
request
to
the
oversight
committee
if
matters
are
of
urgent
nature
rather
than
wait
for
the
three
monthly
plenary
meeting.
The
problem,
noted
by
a
government
representative
and
PR,
is
that
CS
members
were
not
recruited
by
their
own
constitutents
but
selected
or
invited
by
























































4
GFATM
information
is
also
available
on
NAC
website
–
currently
under
construction.

5
Based
on
costs
to
operationalize
an
active
and
effective
secretariat
(hire
professionals,
office
rent,
activitiy
costs)
so
that
the
oversight
committee
may
perform
their
responsibilities.

 7

  9. 9. government
and
development
partners.
Therfore,
their
affiliation
with
their
constituents
is
questionable
and
how
they
prepare
for
a
meeting
is
not
very
clear.

An
observation
to
a
limited
sample
of
attendance
sheets
revealed
that
only
very
few
CS
members
regularly
attend
plenary
meeting.
Therefore,
preparatory
meetings
among
themselves
probably
are
rarely
happened.
Some
members
indicated
that
informal
meetings
were
held
among
CS
members
to
address
certain
issues
and
concerns,
especially
lately.


C.2.
CS
Consultation

Consultation
between
and
among
CS
members
and
their
constituents
is
very
limited.
Observers
and
and
some
CCM
members
denied
that
this
ever
happened.
In
fact,
for
TB
and
Malaria,
this
is
problematic
as
they
do
not
have
structured
constituents
(very
few
for
TB6).
A
few
CS
members
has
its
own
mailing
lists
and
use
it
for
communication,
not
necessarily
consultation.
There
is
a
strong
feeling
among
observers
that
CS
member
do
not
“feel
or
think”
that
they
are
obliged
to
report
back
to
their
constituents.
If
anything
could
be
called
consultation,
some
did
it
informally
through
e‐mails
or
when
they
met
their
constituents
(in
group
members)
in
certain
occasions.

In
addition
to
that,
a
member
informant
clearly
indicates
that
constituency
is
a
problematic
concept
since
they
have
never
have
any
discussions
and
conclusions
and
agree
upon
a
set
of
norms
or
rules
to
deal
with
this
matter.
In
the
absence
of
any
agreements
about
constituency,
this
assessment
captured
a
sense
of
“play
safely”
or
“do
not
risk
yourself”
among
dozens
of
community
organizations
(in
HIV&AIDS)
which
may
target
onself
for
misunderstanding
or
anything
that
goes
wrong.
This
is
a
very
serious
issue
that
need
to
be
adrressed
very
soon.
As
noted
earlier,
this
has
to
do
with
the
way
CS
members
were
selected
and
elected.
In
addition
to
that,
CS
is
supposed
to
outreach
difficult
to
reach
population
(such
as
prison
inmates,
sex
workers,
migrant
workers,
etc.).
If
the
website
for
larger
communication
platform
is
constructed,
the
mechanism
is
available,
at
least
to
networks
and
any
organized
community
groups.
But,
as
indicated
by
one
member,
the
mechanism,
rules
and
regulations
about
this
have
not
been
discussed.
A
concern
is
reflected
on
the
fact
that
since
the
Chair
and
Co‐chair
of
TWG
resigned
(because
they
are
representing
PRs),
no
replacement
have
been
appointed
while
it
is
realized
that
these
persons
and
their
position
play
very
crucial
role
in
providing
technical
oversight
to
CS
members.


D.
CCM
PERFORMANCE
D.1.
Mitigation
of
conflict
of
interest
One
member
indicated
that
current
CCM
does
not
have
the
proper
leadership
to
mitigate
conflict
of
interest.
The
CCM
have
administrative
mechanism7,
but
oversight
function
and
control
is
generally
weak.
Other
members
are
more
optimistic
about
this,
especially
after
painful
lesson
of
2007
when
funds
were
freezed
due
to
mismanagement.
There
are
number
of
examples
when
this
issue
























































6
There
was
a
suggestion
that
TB
is
integrated
with
HIV&AIDS
for
obvious
reasons
7
All
CCM
members
have
to
declare
when
conflict
of
interest
is
present.

 8

  10. 10. is
observed
and
resolved
well.

For
example,
Dr.
Nafsiah
Mboi,
the
Secretary
of
NAC,
who
were
previously
member
of
TWG
&
CCM
stepped
out
of
TWG
and
member
of
CCM
when
NAC
became
one
of
HIV&AIDS
PR
for
round
8
and
9.
A
code
of
conduct
for
CCM
members
has
been
drafted
and
implemented.
This
code
of
conduct
,
among
others,
regulates
when
a
member
connected
or
affiliated
with
a
PR
is
allowed
to
attend
a
meeting
or
not
if
the
meeting
is
to
discuss
matters
related
to
that
PR.

D.2.
Oversight
of
GF
supported
grants

Most
informants
agree
that
this
is
improving,
especially
with
the
support
of
a
more
functioning
secretariat.
The
oversight
is
conducted
by
professional
staff.
Some
members,
however,
indicate
that
oversight
information
is
limited
to
certain
information
on
performance
of
PRs,
exchange
rates,
LFA
visits,
etc.

More
information
on
how
the
available
secretariat
fund
could
be
more
effectively
utlized,
other
external
sources
that
are
accessible
for
CSO
members,
available
expertise
to
assist
CSO
on
certain
issues
–
will
be
appreciated
by
CSO
members.
Limited
resources
at
the
secretariat
consequently
limit
the
control
mechanism
of
CCM.
Observers
could
not
comment
on
this
since
it
is
not
disclosed
to
the
public.


D.3.
Identifying
priority
issues
to
include
in
grant
proposals

This
issue
is
tackled
by
TWG.
On
HIV,
TWG
is
making
reference
to
the
Strategic
Plan.

The
perfomace
of
TWG
on
HIV
&AIDS
has
improved
significantly.
Partly,
they
are
able
to
have
more
extensive
and
significant
consultations
with
stakeholders,
including
civil
society
in
the
provinces.
One
PR,
however,
complained
that
there
were
certain
technical
issues
that
they
felt
were
not
well
consulted
which
resulted
in
serious
lack
of
fund
to
perform
certain
activities,
such
as
outreach
in
their
programs.

within
the
PR
programs
(especially
in
Round
8
for
HIV&AIDS).
In
addition,
a
CS
CCM
member
complained
that
there
was
lack
of
representation
of
CS,
especially
affected
communities,
in
TWG.
This
may
be
due
to
historical
bias
when
members
were
appointed,
no
network
of
key
population
was
available.
This
is
disturbing,
according
to
this
member,
as
CS
CCM
members
do
not
attend
CCM
meeting
very
regularly.
This
means
that
they
are
not
well‐informed
and
may
not
have
much
to
say
in
the
identification
of
important
issues.
This
member
also
said
that
“CCM
role
is
only
to
endorse
whatever
TWG
decisions.
Just
like
in
meeting
at
our
People’s
Assembly…”
(DG).

D.4.
Generating
ambitious,
high
quality
funding
requests
to
the
Global
Fund

On
this
subject,
most
members
agree
that
current
CCM
is
perfoming
much
better.
In
fact,
Indonesia
was
considered
as
one
of
the
biggest
recepients
of

Round
8
and
9.
The
mechanism
to
get
input
from
stakeholders
in
the
provinces
is
better
now.


D.5.
Responding
to
and
fixing
problems
with
Global
Fund
grants


Although
progress
is
acknowledged,
mechanism
to
resolve
problems
remains
a
serious
concern.
Equipped
with
a
better
governance
and
project
implementation

 9

  11. 11. manual
and
painfully
experience
from
2007
has
made
current
CCM
more
proactive
and
accountable.
However,
one
member
complained
about
the
fact
that
many
times,
members
could
not
come
to
the
meeting
and
represented
by
junior
level
staffs
who
did
not
know
much
about
the
issues
and
has
no
authority
to
make
any
decision,
or
to
resolve
problems
or
issues
being
discussed.
Among
CS,
only
30%
of
them
were
active
members
who
regularly
attend
meeting
and
actively
engaged
in
shaping
and
implementing
CCM
agendas.
Another
member
suggests
that
sometimes
miscommunication
with
LFA
complicates
problem
solving,
especially
when
it
comes
to
issues
of
finance.
An
observer
indicates
that
concerted
effort
to
improve
early
detection
is
needed.

D.
5.
Others

One
member
suggests
that
lack
of
organizational
experience
of
many
CCM
members
(especially
CSO),
lack
of
quality
data
base,
and
lack
of
capacity
to
compose
arguments
(especially
a
few
member
of
CSO
from
affected
communities)
and
lack
of
openness
(generally)
contribute
to
the
current
performance
of
CCM.
Many
members
demonstrated
lack
of
commitment
and
awareness
that
they
are
responsible
to
the
people
that
they
represent.
Many
issues
were
not
accommodated
because
lack
of
openness
and
transparency.


E.
ROLE
OF
CIVIL
SOCIETY
AND
THEIR
PERFORMANCE

E.1.
Translating
community
needs

Improved
as
consultation
mechanism
between
TWG
and
stakeholders
is
improving.
Active
members
of
CS
in
CCM
are
seasoned
expert
and
activists.
Their
aspirations
and
ideas
are
respected
by
their
colleauges
and
the
community.
They
are
also
trusted
by
their
communities.
Some
new
members,
however,
require
more
time
to
learn
and
gain
trust
among
their
communities.
To
optimize
CS
input,
more
CS
member
should
be
elected
into
TWG.
One
member
is
concerned
with
the
fact
that
their
membership
is
expiring.
It
may
not
be
easy
to
substitute
senior
and
active
CS
members
in
the
CCM.
Learning
from
failure
in
Round
78,
NAC
initiated
to
access
more
stakeholders,
especially
civil
society
members,
in
the
provinces
and
facilitate
their
participation
in
Round
8
proposal.
The
result
was
a
well‐done
proposal.
Similar
process
in
Round
9
with
similar
result.
CCM
observer,
however,
noted
lack
of
transparency
on
this.
One
member
also
notes
that
Civil
society
needs
a
number
of
capacity
building
in
technical
knowledge
and
in
advocacy.
Sometimes
there
is
an
impression
that
their
ideas
and
concerns
are
not
being
appreciated
and
accommodated.
One
informant
suggest
that
ideas
to
strengthen
CS
member
of
CCM
to
become
equal
partners
were
once
not
widely
received.
“It’s
(the
argument)
in
only
good
on
paper!
In
reality,
our
CSOs
are
not
ready”
(FL).

Equally,
to
promote
CSO
as
PR
was
not
esasily
accepted
by
government
and
development
partners
–
although
after
a
lengthy
debate
and
advocacy,
it
was
accommodated
through
voting
mechanism.



























































8
Composed
mostly
by
development
partners
and
conducted
mostly
in
English

 10

  12. 12. 
E.2.
Grant
monitoring

With
the
appointment
of
Indonesian
Planned
Parenthood
and
Nahdatul
Ulama,
it
is
demonstrated
that
CS
is
is considered as an important stakeholder inimplementation and grant monitoring.
A
monitoring
mechanism
is
built
in
in
program
implementation.
CCM
is
supposed
to
have
monitoring
visit
every
6
month.
It
is
noted
by
observer,
however,
that
to
be
able
to
monitor
GF
supported
grants
mechanism
for
transparency
should
be
improved.
This
means
that
minutes
of
meetings,
new
agendas
or
plans,
and
any
recommendations
by
the
oversight
committee
or
monitoring
and
evaluation
results
should
be
published
and
shared
widely
among
members
and
their
constituents.
Dialogues
outside
of
the
CCM
meeting
should
be
held
regularly.



E.3.
Selection
of
CS
member
to
CCM
(also
on
Fairness)
The
selection
process
for
civil
society
for
the
next
CCM
period
2010‐2012
has
been
going
on
over
the
last
few
weeks.
Due
to
limited
time
and
a
number
of
other
issues
such
as
the
approval
of
Round
9,
the
process
of
selection
was
delayed
and
the
membership
of
the
2007‐2009
CCM
extended
up
to
December
2009.


The
present
selection
process
for
civil
society
has
not
been
as
open
to
other
civil
society
colleagues.
No
notice
or
any
information
on
the
ongoing
process
is
published
in
member
mailsist
or
website,
or
any
form
of
public
media.
According
to
the
Global
Fund
guidelines
and
Indonesia
Governance
Manual,
the
selection
process
of
civil
society
members
of
the
CCM
must
be
fair,
open
and
transparent.
It
would
have
been
better
if
more
time
was
available
for
the
selection
process,
so
that
the
wider
civil
society
groups
and
colleagues
could
be
involved.



According
to
our
informants,
criteria
and
process
of
selection
are
now
being
discussed.
It
was
used
to
be
dictated
by
the
government.
In
the
current
election
of
new
CCM
membership,
there
is
an
opportunity
to
implement
rules
in
the
manual
where
CS
members
may
openly
nominate
their
constituents.
This
is
now
possible
as
some
degree
of
representation
is
there
within
CCM.
However,
fairness
is
a
very
difficult
issue
as
CS
in
CCM
is
representing
5
broad
community
groups.
While
there
are
hundreds
of
organized
community
groups
for
HIV&AIDS,
for
example,
there
is
only
a
few
organized
groups
for
TB
and
none
for
Malaria.
Among
HIV&AIDS
communities,
there
are
a
number
of
unresolved
turf
issues
that
affect
harmony
and
unity
of
different
networks
and
groups
of
people
affected
by
HIV&AIDS.
In
the
lack
of
public
mechanism
issue
(such
as
a
website9)
it
is
difficult
to
determine
whom
should
they
informed
and
how.
Most
of
them
support
transparency,
but
do
not
know
what
to
do
with
it.


On
representation
of
vulnerable
groups,
the
present
CCM
members
do
have
representation

of
pople
living
with
the
disease
(TB
and
HIV).
Members
are
very
open
to
have
representatives
of
vulnerable
groups
such
as
sex
workers,
IDU
coalition,
MSM,
and
the
like.
The
problem,
again
is
that
previously
membership
























































9
Website
is
currently
the
only
doable
and
agrreable
mechanism
in
the
short
run
given
available
fund
in
the
CCM
secretariat.


 11

  13. 13. to
CCM
was
by
government
appoinment.
Currently
is
is
possible
and
very
much
encouraged
to
nominate
members
and
alternate
members
from
vulnerable
groups.

It
is
realized
that
some
grpups
will
be
left
out
due
to
lack
of
communication
with
current
CCM
(such
as
Sex
Workers
–
male‐Female‐and
Transgender),
lack
of
representation
in
other
forum,
Not
yet
identified
and
key
affected
population
(such
as
migrant
workers),
and
lack
of
capacity
in
engaging
meaningfully
in
any
decision
making
processes
with
government
and
developing
patners.


Among
observers10,
however,
there
is
a
very
strong
impression
that
the
whole
process
of
selection
is
tightly
closed.
There
is
no
information
on
mechanism,
criteria,
and
selection
process
available
to
the
constituents.
This
fact
is
worrying
and
raise
some
serious
concerns
among
observers
and
PR
members.
Favouritism
and
nepotism
is
such
a
common
practice
in
our
culture.
In
addition
to
that,
there
are
concern
over
indication
that
the
government
may
want
more
representation
in
CCM
that
could
reduce
participation
of
civil
society.

E.4.
Selection/election
of
civil
society
Principal
Recipients
and
Sub‐Recipients

Informants
suggests
that
they
were
involved
but
this
process
is
lacking
of
transparency
and
consultation
with
non
CCM
members
(constituents).
With
lack
of
regular
attencance
of
CS
members,
this
becomes
a
serious
issue.
Our
informant
(FL)
for
example,
indicates
that
not
only
CSO
members
are
often
absence
in
regular
meetings,
they
sometime
send
very
young
and
inexperience
representatives
to
the
meeting.




E.5.
Responding
to
and
fixing
grant
implementation
challenges

There

is
limited
evidence
that
CS
members
do
respond
to
this
issue.
Previously
mentioned
lack
of
technical
capacity
and
attendance
in
meeting
prevents
them
from
functioning
well
for
this
purpose.

E.6.
Communication
and
consultation
with
their
constituencies
&
other
CSOs

CS
members
of
CCM
suggests
that
they
are
doing
better
at
this.
Meetings
are
conducted
more
regularly
and
CSO
members
are
always
involved.
Those
participate
in
the
meeting
always
inform
their
own
member
organizations
through
their
mail‐list
or
other
means.
There
is
limited
fund
and
mission
activities
to
inform
the
public
that
CCM
member
may
use,
including
to
inform
CS
constituents
in
the
provinces.
One
observer
and
a
development
partner
informants,
however,
suggest
that
meeting
schedules
have
never
been
published
publicly
and
that
they
never
witness
any
CSO
members
communicate
and
get
input
or
feedback
openly
from

community
forums.
Unfinished
concstruction
of
website
and
unavailability
of
other
mechanism
(such
as
a
Newsletter)
is
part
of
the
current
lack
of
communication.
























































10
Our
(observer)
informants
came
from
civil
society
organizations.
The
same
impression
was
actually
expressed
by
one
representative
of
the
development
partner.


 12

  14. 14. 

E.7.
Developing
a
shared
strategic
agenda
with
CSO
representatives
on
CCM


One
informants
describe
the
situation
as
follows
(NF):


“
There
is
no
communication
between
CCM
member
to
civil
society.
There
are
representative
from
CSO,
but
not
mechanism
to
consult
or
asking
their
constituent
(civil
society)
to
make
them
to
be
able
to
improve
their
role
on
CCM.

As
an
AIDS
activist
I
heard
about
what’s
happened
inside
CCM
through
some
of
my
personal
contacts.

I
can
not
say
the
performance
of
current
civil
society
representatives
of
CCM

is
well
enough
to
optimize
civil
society
role
and
involvement
on
CCM”

An
active
observer
also
accounts
that
there
may
be
no
shared
strategic
agenda
among
CSO
members
on
CCM
as
they
are
acting
as
individual/organizational
representatives
and
unclear
about
their
wider
constituents
ouside
of
their
orgnization
and
affiliated
groups.


E.8.
Possible
ways
to
strengthen
the
process
of
selection/election
of
civil
society
members
of
the
CCM

Current
members
acknowledge
that
it
is
difficult
to
keep
or
make
everyone
happy
and
satisfied.
Availability
of
database
should
help
to
identify
prospective
members.
The
process
should
start
early
to
allow
for
an
effective
and
open
selection.
Wider
civil
society
groups,
from
the
five
different
sectors
should
be
consulted
and
involved
in
the
process,
including
organizations
representing
the
three
diseases,
HIV,
TB,
and
Malaria.
Educate
CS
member
on
Global
Fund
and
its
relevance
to
our
current
response
to
the
epidemics.
Use
the
media,
like
daily
newspapers
and
existing
internet
network
to
inform
them,
invite
participation,
and
provide
feedback
of
the
results.
Again,
a
CCM
website
should
be
very
useful.

The
previous
Coalition
for
Healthy
Indonesia
may
be
invited
and
asked
to
help
facilitate
selection
process.


There
should
also
be
some
continuity
between
the
incumbent
CCM
members
and
newly
selected
members.
Therefore,
current
active
and
committed
members
of
the
CCM
should
be
encouraged
to
continue
with
the
new
membership.
This
will
increase
the
quality
of
the
new
CCM.
One
informant
insists
that
it
is
membership
of
CS,
and
especially
representative
of
vulnerable
groups,
in
TWG
is
more
important
than
in
CCM.


F.
MAIN
CHALLENGES
PREVENTING
GOOD
PERFORMANCE
OF
GLOBAL
FUND
GRANTS


One
of
the
things
that
need
improvement
and
strengthening
is
the
oversight
of
Global
Fund
grants.
The
CCM
and
CCM
Oversight
Committee
should
be
strengthened
for
this
purpose.
A
group
of
active
and
committed
individuals
is
required
to
make
this
work
to
ensure
good
performance
of
Global
Fund
grants
in
Indonesia
now
and
in
the
future.
For
that,
our
informants
idicate
that
CCM
generally
need
more
intake
of
qualified
members
who
are
recruited
through
a

 13

  15. 15. transparent
mechanism
to
ensure
trust
and
support.
Considering
that
Indonesia
is
a
large
country
and
government
policies
are
decentralized,
CCM
should
maintain
flexibility
and
awareness
that
variations
across
provinces
and
districts
may
require
different
strategies
and
approaches
for
program
implementation.
Currently
most
of
the
HIV&AIDS
planning
and
strategizing
are
conducted
in
Jakarta,
where
most
of
the
expertise
and
other
resources
are
available.
While
in
most
cities
in
Java
the
epidemic
is
mainly
transmitted
trough
heterosexual
and
injecting
drug
use,
in
Riau,
West
Kalimantan,
and
Papua
it
is
mostly
heterosexual
transmission.
Lack
of
expertise,
resources,
and
civil
society’s
movement
in
these
provinces,
however,
prevent
significant
investment
and
commitment
by
donor
and
government.



Administrative
and
managerial
challenges
that
prevent
effective
communication
between
CCM
and
its
wider
constituents
should
be
resolved
very
soon.
Capacity
building
for
CS
PRs
in
project
management
is
crucial
so
that
they
could
perform
effectively
and
in
accountable
manner.

CCM
need
to
note
that
every
PR
will
have
to
deal
with
a
certain
number
of
program
implementors,
oversight
committee
will
have
much
havier
burden
than
in
the
past.
The
Oversight
Committee
and
the
TWG
should
be
able
to
provide
lessons
learned
and
be
able
to
advocate
the
solutions
to
CCM
or
GFATM
Geneva.

Currently,
many
CCM
members
are
non‐active
and
nothing
has
been
done
to
activate
alternate
members
of
replace
them
when
both
were
non‐active.
It
is
very
clear
that
the
current
CCM
secretariat
has
not
been
able
to
deal
with
this
problem
effectively.
Some
of
the
alternate
members
are
living
in
different
cities
and
provinces
and
CCM
is
lacking
of
resources
to
support
their
participation.
Since
election
to
the
current
CCM
had
been
by
government
appointment,
some
elected
members
(fixed
and
alternate)
may
not
have
the
expcted
motivation
and
commitment.
Our
observation
also
suggests
that
the
capacity
of
CCM
leadership
to
resolve
differences
between
members,
value
urgency
of
matters,
and
to
create
teamwork
atmosphere
affect
the
participation
of
alternate
members.


F.1.
Active
role
of
local
CSO
in
the
process
of
developing
Global
Fund
proposals
and
monitoring
performance

­
By
civil
society
itself:
 
CS
members
are
very
much
involved
in
the
Technical
Working
Groups
for
AIDS,
TB,
and
Malaria,
and
in
the
development
of
Global
Fund
proposals.
The
CCM
Oversight
Committee
also
includes
a
number
of
civil
society
members.
It
should
be
noted,
however,
that
since
activities
are
mostly
organized
in
Jakarta
–
only
CS
members
who
reside
in
Jakarta
are
mostly
involved.
To
bring
CS
members
from
the
provinces
and
districts
regularly
to
Jakarta
will
need
more
significant
funding.
NAC,
however,
facilitated
consultation
with
CS
HIV&AIDS
in
the
provinces
as
delineated
earlier.
In
addition,
many
CS
members
do
not
have
technical
knowledge
and
skills
to
contribute
to
highly
technical
discussion
among
TWG
members
and
CCM.
CCM
and
TWG
should
be
more
proactive
in
talent
scouting
among
CSOs.
Otherwise,
their
participation
and
input
is
quite
limited.


 14

  16. 16. 
­
By
other
stakeholders
on
CCM
(governments,
UN
agencies,
donors)
 
Government
colleagues
and
UN
agencies/donors
are
also
involved
in
the
Technical
Working
groups
and
provide
substantial
input
to
the
development
of
Global
Fund
proposals.
The
CCM
Oversight
Committee
also
includes
a
number
of
other
stakeholders
(government,
UN,
donors).
One
member
informant
acknowledged
that
sometimes
there
was
lack
of
appreciation
of
government
stakeholders
to
take
serious
account
of
the
aspirations
of
CS
members,
especially
due
“to
lack
of
initiative
and
technical
capacity”
although
government
perception
is
not
entirely
true
(FL).
The
government
should
reliaze
that
CSO
also
have
the
responsibility
that
GF
supported
program
are
sustainable.
It
is
also
important,
therefore,
for
the
government
to
help
promote
GF
among
CSOs
and
to
help
prepare
them
to
be
accountable
institutions
which
can
get
funding
from
PRs.



F.2.
Civil
society
representatives
as
equal
partners
on
the
CCM
and
in
relevant
work

Our
informants
suggest
that
since
election
to
current
CCM
membership
is
by
government
appointment,
there
is
an
imbalance
of
structural
power
where
government
tend
to
dominate.
Senior
and
well‐known
activists
who
represent
CSO
have
earned
the
respect
of
government
representative
long
before
CCM
exists.
These
activists
are
the
most
vocal
members
of
CCM.
But
other
members
are
not
as
privileged,
especially
members
of
affected
communities
due
to
their
lower
formal
education
or
simply
not
being
known.


F.3.
Three
most
important
capacity
development
needs
of
civil
society
members
of
the
CCM.

Different
area
of
needs
have
been
expressed
by
our
informants.
Knowledge
of
CCM
and
the
disease,
mastery
of
the
English
language
for
communication,
and
communication
skills
in
technical
meeting
are
considered
important.
Other
stressed
the
importance
of
the
ability
to
create
enabling
enviroment
for
transparency,
dialogue,
and
consultation
with
constituents.
A
website
and
a
newsletter
in
Bahasa,
translation
of
CCM
Materials
into
Bahasa
Indonesia,
and
bilingual
minutes
of
meeting
have
been
expressed
by
our
informants.

In
addition
to
that,
improved
technical
capacity
to
understand
data
for
monitoring
and
evaluation
(including
financial
data),
to
compose
a
proposal,
to
do
advocacy,
are
important
areas
for
capacity
building.


One
member
reminds
us
that
being
a
member
of
CCM
has
to
assume
very
demanding
tasks
and
resilience.
Everyone
needs
time
to
adjust
to
all
the
demands
and
adversities
in
the
organizations.
One
can
stand
all
of
those
when
one
is
fully
committed
to
the
issue
that
s/he
is
advocating.


F.4.
Other
factors
need
to
be
changed
to
ensure
that
civil
society
members
on
the
CCM
represent
their
constituency
effectively



 15

  17. 17. Newsletter,
website,
database,
and
effective
secretariat
should
be
there
to
support
dialogue
and
consultation
of
CS
and
their
constituents.
Elected
members
should
assume
responsibilities
to
provide
feedbacks,
information
and
seek
advise
to
and
with
their
constituents.
There
should
be
a
mechanism
to
check
whether
those
responsibilities
are
met.

Government
partners
should
be
more
open
and
less
dominant
in
decision
making
processes.
Government
sectors
should
also
faclitate
and
help
CSO
to
grow
as
fully
equal
partner
for
sustainability
of
programs.
It
is
possible
for
government
and
development
partners
to
mobilize
their
resources
to
assist
or
help
newly
emerging
CSOs
to
develop
their
capacities.
Currently,
the
UN
and
development
partners
have
been
engaged
in
such
activities
(providing
training/workshop
on
Harm
Reduction,
advocacy
strategies,
many
aspect
of
project
management,
etc.).
Government
institutions
have
not
been
as
much
engaged
and
committed.





RECOMMEDATIONS
FOR
ADVOCACY
TEAM

 (1) Create
enabling
environment
for
CSO,
especially
to
improve
its
system
of
 communication
within
CCM
and
with
constituents
outside
of
CCM
and
to
 nurture
committment
and
equal
partnership.

 a. Improve
GFATM
and
CCM
literacy
(structure,
functions,
roles
of
 relevant
stakeholders)
through
publication
of
relevant
information
 in
the
forms
of
booklets,
brochures,
newsletter,
and
website
in
 Bahasa
Indonesia.
Tutoring
on
CCM
to
CSO
members
may
be
 conducted
utilizing
those
materials.
Link
all
CCM
website
to
CCM
 website
(when
constructed)
or
provide
CCM
information
in
each
 members
website.
Use
available
fund
to
do
GFATM
and
CCM
work
 advocacy
in
the
provinces
where
GF
fund
is
utilize.

 b. Conduct
meetings
in
Bahasa
Indonesia,
provide
English
tralslators
 for
English
speaking
members.
Development
partners
should
send
 their
representatives
who
speak
local
languange
or
to
bring
their
 own
translators.

 c. Write
minutes
of
meeting
in
both
Bahasa
and
English.
 d. Create
teamwork/equal
partnership
atmosphere
in
CCM.
The
 leadership
of
CCM
should
work
hard
to
make
each
member
of
CCM
 feels
equally
important
and
able
to
contribute
to
the
achievement
 of
goals
and
objectives
set
out
in
GFATM
proposals.
The
secretariat
 should
be
able
to
create
a
system
where
responsibilities
are
 distributed
equally
and
monitored
regularly,
where
conflict
of
 interests
are
resolved
constructively,
where
achievement
or
 improvement
and
comittment
are
appreciated,
and
where
inactive
 members
are
outreach
and

‐
if
necessary
–
replaced
just
in
time
by
 alternate
members.

 e. Provide
assistance
for
participation
to
most
marginalized
CMM
 members
from
CSO.
To
avoid
debates
of
Who’s
Who,
the
 secretariat
may
want
to
do
mapping
of
resources
within
the
new
 CCM
membership.
Create
a
database
and
directory
of
members
 and
relevant
stakeholders.
Mobilize
available
resources
in
regional

 16

  18. 18. or
global
alliances
or
networks
of
CSO
organizations
(such
as
 ICASO,
ITPC,
etc.)
for
technical
inputs
or
funding
of
important
 activities.
Use
available
item
in
the
Global
Fund
–
such
as
Civil
 Society
Streghtening
(CSS)
component
–
to
assist
CSO.
There
may
 already
be
a
number
of
plans
within
that
component
that
should
 be
implemented.


 f. Socialize
and
enforced
CCM
code
of
conduct
to
mitigate
conflict
 and
abuse
of
power,

 

 (2) Improve
capacity
of
CSO
members,
especially
the
marginalized,
in
the
 following
areas:
 a. Knowledge
of
the
disease
and
epidemic.
 b. Knowledge
on
project
management
(especially
M
&
E)
and
general
 organizational
management.
 c. Advocacy
skills:
communication
and
presentation,
lobbying,
 proposal
writing,
etc.
 d. Computer
literacy
 
 (3) Create
a
Watchdog
mechanism
of
CCM.
Since
time
is
very
precious,
 constituents
may
have
no
time
to
waste
while
waiting
the
new
CCM
to
 improve
its
performance.

GFATM
or
CSO
alliance
may
consider
the
 urgency
of
creating
a
small
group
of
people
or
an
institution
to
provide
 information
and
feedbacks
to
constituents.
It
may
also
function
as
a
 facilitator
for
constructive
dialogue
and
debates.

 



 17

  19. 19. ATTACHMENTS
Attachment (1)Source: JOTHI (Download: http://www.jothi.or.id/?q=CCM/Ind/4 -- January 21, 2010)
 18

  20. 20. Attachmnet (2)Technical
Working
Groups
(TWG)11

Purpose
and
Objectives
Technical
Working
Groups
are
permanent
bodies
that
are
established
for
each
of
the
three
diseases
(AIDS,
Tuberculosis
and
Malaria)
and
given
a
mandate
by
the
CCM
to
meet
to
discuss/review
and
endorse
certain
proposals,
reports
and
other
documents
 and
 carry
 out
 the
 assignments
 given
 to
 them.
 All
 formal
activities/meetings
are
documented
and
reported
to
the
CCM.


Composition
 1.





Chair:
a
CCM
member
who
is
elected
by
the
members
of
the
TWG
either
 through
consensus
or
by
a
vote.
 2.





Members:
(i)
CCM
members
who
are
appointed
by
the
CCM.
 (ii)
 Non‐CCM
 members
 who
 are
 selected
 from
 the
 professional
 sector
by
the
TWG.
The
 chair
 and
 members
 shall
 be
 appointed
 for
 a
 two‐year
 term
 and
 may
 be
replaced
at
any
time
during
their
term.

Roles
and
Responsibilities
 a.



To
review
and
make
recommendations
to
the
CCM
on
proposals
that
will
 be
submitted
to
the
GF
or
other
funding
sources.
 b.



 To
 review
 and
 make
 recommendations
 to
 the
 CCM
 on
 requests
 for
 continuing
funding.

 c.



To
review
the
program
implementation
performance
of
the
PR
through:

 









 i.







 Quarterly
 work
 plans:
 review
 and
 endorse
 work
 plans
 that
 will
be
submitted
to
the
GF
or
other
funding
sources.
 








 ii.







 Quarterly
 progress
 reports:
 review
 and
 endorse
 progress
 reports
 that
 will
 be
 submitted
 to
 the
 GF
 or
 other
 funding
 sources.
 The
 recommendations
 shall
 include
 comments
 on
 grant
 performance
 using
 the
overall
grant
rating/grant
scorecard.

 







 iii.







 Annual
 work
 plans
 and
 reports:
 review
 and
 make
 recommendations
to
the
CCM
on
annual
plans
and
reports
that
will
be
 submitted
to
the
GF
or
other
funding
sources.
 






iv.







Regular
site
visits
(at
least
twice
a
year).
 d.



If
a
quarterly
progress
report
or
workplan
cannot
be
endorsed,
to
ask
the
 PR
to
make
improvements
and
return
the
amended
document
to
the
TWG
for
 approval.

 e.



In
reviewing
the
overall
program
performance
of
the
PR
and
acting
as
the
 EARS
 (Early
 Alert
 Response
 System)
 of
 the
 CCM,
 to
 coordinate
 closely
 with
 the
FTT.
FTT
members
should
be
invited
to
attend
the
quarterly
meetings
of
 the
TWG.
 f.




If
any
oversights,
mismanagement,
problems
or
suspected
violations
are
 found
 in
 the
 implementation
 of
 GFATM
 programs
 in
 Indonesia,
 to
























































11
Indonesia
CCM
Governance
Manual
(2007)
–
Available
in
Bahasa
Indonesia
(Panduan
Tata
Kelola
CCM
Indonesia)

through
JOTHI
website:
http://www.jothi.or.id/?q=CCM/Ind

 19

  21. 21. recommend
 to
 the
 CCM
 that
 the
 matter
 be
 followed
 up
 by
 the
 Oversight
 Committee.

 g.



To
report
all
results
of
their
work
to
the
CCM
at
each
plenary
meeting
of
 the
CCM.
The
operational
expenses
of
a
TWG
shall
be
charged
to
the
operational
budget
of
the
CCM.

Oversight
Committee

Purpose
and
Objectives
The
Oversight
Committee
is
a
permanent
CCM
committee
established
to
review
reports
on
any
indications
of
oversight,
mismanagement,
problems,
or
suspected
violations
 of
 the
 rules
 and
 procedures
 arising
 in
 the
 GFATM
 program
implementation
 in
 Indonesia
 to
 ensure
 that
 the
 programs
 yield
 good
programmatic
and
financial
performance
with
reference
to
the
agreed
objectives
and
 based
 on
 the
 principles
 of
 good
 governance,
 accountability
 and
transparency.
In
the
event
of
any
problems
being
found
by
a
TWG
or
the
FTT,
the
CCM
shall
authorize
the
Oversight
Committee
to
follow
up
and
verify
such
issues
and
 provide
 recommendations
 on
 actins
 to
 be
 taken.
 The
 Oversight
 Committee
serves
as
a
bridge
and
investigative
body
between
the
TWG
or
FTT
and
the
CCM.

Its
 role
 is
 to
 receive
 reports
 from
 these
 bodies
 and
 others
 on
 possible
mismanagement
or
problems,
investigate,
and
submit
its
findings
to
the
CCM.


Composition
The
 Oversight
 Committee
 shall
 comprise
 a
 Chair,
 seven
 members
 and
 a
 two‐member
secretariat.
The
National
Audit
Agency
(BPKP)
shall
also
participate.

 1.





Chair:
A
CCM
Member
who
is
appointed
by
the
CCM.
 2.





Members:
(i)

7
CCM
Members
who
are
appointed
by
the
CCM.

 (ii)
 Non‐CCM
 Members
 from
 BPKP
 (the
 National
 Development
 Finance
Comptroller).
The
 chair
 and
 members
 shall
 be
 appointed
 for
 a
 two‐year
 term
 and
 may
 be
replaced
at
any
time
during
their
term.
Roles
and
Responsibilities
 a.



 To
 review
 and
 verify
 reports
 on
 indications
 of
 any
 oversight,
 mismanagement,
 problems,
 or
 suspected
 violations
 arising
 in
 the
 implementation
of
GFATM
programs,
based
on:

 









 i.







 Evaluation
 reports
 from
 the
 LFA,
 consisting
 of
 periodical
 progress
 report,
 financial
 reports,
 procurement
 reports,
 human
 resources
management
reports,
and
other
special
reports.
 








ii.







Issues
submitted
by
the
TWGs
and
FTT.
 







iii.







Issues
submitted
by
whistleblowers.
 






iv.







Other
specified
issues.

 b.



To
conduct
meetings
and/or
site
visits
in
order
to
gather
information
and
 verify
issues/findings
from
the
above
reports
when
necessary.
 c.



 To
 submit
 the
 recommendations
 from
 the
 results
 of
 such
 reviews,
 meetings
and
visits
to
the
CCM.
 d.



To
monitor
the
follow‐up
actions
by
all
concerned
parties
to
address
the
 findings.


 20

  22. 22. 

Committee
 activities
 shall
 be
 funded
 from
 the
 CCM’s
 operational
 budget
 and
other
eligible
sources.




 21


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