Great Depression How Bad Was It?

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Shows how bad the depression was as regards unemployment, stock losses, suicides, dust bowl, and poverty. Even gives the story of Bonnie and Clyde.

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Great Depression How Bad Was It?

  1. 1. Great Depression How Bad Was It?
  2. 2. The Great Depression
  3. 3. 100,000 businesses failed. Stock values fell from $89 billion to $15 billion. From 381 to 41. $74 billion was lost. 25% unemployment rate [15 million](125 million in the U.S.) [Unemployment was 3% in 1929.] Unemployment stayed above 14.3% from 1931-1940. Average unemployment was 18% 10,797 banks failed out of over 25,000, taking the life savings of 9 million people. The Great Depression [How Bad Was It?]
  4. 4. In some cities, girls danced only for 10 cents . 333,000 could not go to school. M any schools were open only three days a week for eight months. One million lost their homes. Housing starts dropped 90%. GDP dropped from $104 billion in 1929 to $56 billion in 1933. “ That will be .10”. “ Don’t thank me. Thank God someone asked you to dance. “ I didn’t say, ‘Would you like to dance,’ I said, you look fat in those pants.” The Great Depression
  5. 5. The Great Depression was so bad that when Bonnie and Clyde were shot, [Clyde’s body had 187 bullet holes and Bonnie’s body had 52 bullet holes] that morticians complained that they couldn’t hold embalming fluid.
  6. 6. Their “death hats” were auctioned for $32,000. Clyde’s “death shirt” auctioned for $85,000 “ Death car” w. 160 bullet holes auctioned for $250,000. 1967 “Movie Death car” Many of the bullets went thru the car door, Clyde’s body, Bonnie’s body, then out the other side of the death car. T he “32 Ford” & “ 57 C hevy” are the cornerstone cars of the hot-rod business. And – the Chrysler 300
  7. 7. Apple sellers could make $1.15 profit on 72 sold apples. Many factory wages went from .55 an hour to .05 an hour. Agriculture collapsed. Prices and wages dropped around 25%. Factory production dropped 50%. Auto production fell from 4.5 million cars in 1929 to 1.1 million in 1933. Those who checked into hotels were asked, “ For sleeping or jumping”? The Great Depression [continued]
  8. 8. “ F or S leeping or jumping?
  9. 9. Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas - 1934 THE DUST BOWL
  10. 10. Storm approaching Elkhart, Kansas in 1937
  11. 11. Dust buried cars and wagons in South Dakota in 1936
  12. 12. HARDEST HIT REGIONS <ul><li>Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Colorado were the hardest hit regions during the Dust Bowl </li></ul><ul><li>Many farmers migrated to California and other Pacific Coast states </li></ul>Boy covers his mouth to avoid dust, 1935
  13. 13. Photographer Dorothea Lange captures a family headed west to escape the dust storms
  14. 15. Great Depression Stats [In 1958 dollars] <ul><li>Year U nempl Real GDP “C” “Ig” “G” In. R ate Inflation </li></ul><ul><li>3.2 203.6 139.6 40.4 22.0 5.9 ___ </li></ul><ul><li>8.9 183.5 130.4 27.4 24.3 3.6 -2.6 </li></ul><ul><li>16.3 169.5 126.1 16.8 25.4 2.6 -10.1 </li></ul><ul><li>24.1 144.2 114.8 4.7 24.2 2.7 -9.3 </li></ul><ul><li>1933 25.2 141.5 112.8 5.3 23.3 1.7 - 2.2 </li></ul><ul><li>22.0 154.3 118.1 9.4 26.6 1.0 7.4 </li></ul><ul><li>20.3 169.5 125.5 18.0 27.0 0.8 0.9 </li></ul><ul><li>17.0 193.2 138.4 24.0 31.8 0.8 0.2 </li></ul><ul><li>14.3 203.2 143.1 29.9 30.8 0.9 4.2 </li></ul><ul><li>19.1 192.9 140.2 17.0 33.9 0.8 -1.3 </li></ul><ul><li>17.2 209.4 148.2 24.7 35.2 0.6 -1.6 </li></ul><ul><li>1940 14.6 227.2 155.7 33.0 36.4 0.6 1.6 </li></ul>-30 % -20 % -87 % -23 %
  15. 16. Animationeconomics.com

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