Kevin Nasky, DO
WHAT DID WE KNOW IN 
        1950?



   Not much.
WHAT DID WE KNOW IN 
            1950?
⎯ Brain was thought to be entirely 
  electrical
⎯ Acetylcholine was the only 
  kn...
DISCOVERED BEFORE 1950
⎯ Existence of serotonin in platelets
⎯ LSD (that it was a hallucinogen and 
  that it was chemical...
“When I was an undergraduate 
1950                           student at Cambridge (late 
                               50...
“When I was an undergraduate 
1950                           student at Cambridge (late 
                               50...
1950


Acetylcholine was known to be a 
  neurotransmitter, but in the 
peripheral nervous system only
WHAT DIDN’T WE KNOW IN 
         1950?



        A lot.
WHAT DIDN’T WE KNOW IN 
         1950?



   For example…
…as late as 1960, 
(now Nobel 
laureate) Arvid
Carlsson was 
practically laughed 
out of town when 
he proposed that 
dopa...
WHAT DIDN’T WE KNOW IN 
         1950?

Since neurotransmitters were not 
 even understood to play any role 
 in the CNS, ...
THE CONCEPT OF AN ANTIPSYCHOTIC OR 
  AN ANTIDEPRESSANT DID NOT EXIST
HOW WERE WE TREATING 
    MENTAL ILLNESS IN 1950?
Most 
“treatments”
were simply 
measures to 
sedate patients in 
overcro...
Physical Methods
Insulin 
        coma


      Leucotomy
ECT
Psychotropic Methods



Bromides   Barbiturates
Paraldehyde Opioids
TREATMENTS OF CHOICE

Psychosis    Insulin Coma
             Deep Sleep
Depression   ECT
             Opioids
Anxiety     ...
A QUICK REVIEW…


Chlorpromazine and 
     Reserpine
IN SEARCH OF BETTER 
  ANTIHISTAMINES
Speaking of Antihistamines…

   What do Benadryl, 
      Phenergan, 
 Thorazine and Tofranil 
   have in common?
Speaking of Antihistamines…

   Definitely not their 
        indications:
    allergies, nausea, 
psychosis and depressio...
A (very) short course in the 
  chemistry of antihistamines: 
How Benadryl became Thorazine 
          (well, sort of)
HOW DO YOU MAKE AN 
  ANTIHISTAMINE?


      Simple.
   4 Easy Steps…
Start with a substituted ethyl amine




Substitute methyl or other short alkyl groups in R1 
and R2
X = C, O or N
Add an ...
Example: 
                 diphenhydramine

               X = oxygen
Aryl groups 
at R3 & R4


                   Methyl ...
henri    Experimented with various 
          phenothiazine anti‐
laborit   histamines in his lytic 
          cocktails t...
paul                  Charpentier 
charpentier              synthesized a series of 
                         phenothiazin...
Promethazine fits the classic 
structure of an antihistamine
Flight Plan for Anesthetic Objective

“…like a conscientious airman
[the anesthesiologist] previously
has filed a flight p...
Laborit wonders if there’s an even 
better compound than promethazine 
for his quot;lytic cocktailquot;
                  ...
henri    Laborit asks
laborit   Rhône‐Poulenc to 
          make a more 
          centrally‐acting 
          antihistami...
PROMAZINE
             propyl
             (3‐carbon alkyl)




Replaced isopropyl group with a 
 straight carbon chain pr...
Laborit has good results with 
Promazine, but said it was too weak. 
Asks Charpentier: Can you make 
me a stronger Promazi...
HOW DO YOU MAKE 
PROMAZINE MORE POTENT?
  It was well known that 
 adding a halogen to an 
 organic molecule usually 
incr...
so Charpentier added 
      one chloride atom to 
      Promazine and forever 
      changed psychiatry.




CHLORpromazine
BTW…




Replace one sulfur atom…
…with an ethylene linkage, preventing 
formation of the benzene ring and you get
imipramine
“ME TOO” DRUGS
•Replace the chlorine in 
 chlorpromazine with a 
 trifluoromethyl group, and you 
 get trifluoperazine (St...
“ME TOO” DRUGS
Further manipulation of 
this molecular structure 
yielded numerous other 
agents with antipsychotic 
activ...
CHLORPROMAZINE


Summary (short version)
A TRANQUILIZING 
ANTIHYPERTENSIVE 
 (that eventually makes you 
         depressed)
RESERPINE SUMMARY
Derived from Rauwolfia Serpentina
Commonly used antihypertensive in early 
 1950s
Noted to have tranquil...
Ciba 
 markets 
“Serpasil”

I couldn’t 
resist the 
urge to 
show this 
slide again
…acts as a gentle mood‐
leveling agent…sets up needed 
‘tranquility barrier’ for many 
patients who, without some 
help, a...
Alternative to Serpasil for 
           Mom



 Give the boy…
..a bowl of 
Reserpine’s popularity 
           fades
  After a short‐lived popularity 
 from 1954 to 1957, the use of 
reserpine rapid...
Reserpine’s Relevance

Large contribution to eventual 
development of catecholamine 
 hypothesis of depression and 
   dop...
bernard         Brodie at NIH found that 
 ‘steve’        the brains of animals given 
 brodie         reserpine had very ...
Reserpine’s Mechanism

Inhibits ATP/Mg2+ pump 
responsible for the reuptake of 
NT into presynaptic vesicles
Results in NE...
A FAILED SLEEP AID 
AND ANTIPSYCHOTIC
Häfliger and Schinder
Synthesize Imipramine
J.R. GEIGY PHARMACEUTICAL 
             FIRM

Swiss firm founded in 1758
Geigy later merged with Swiss firm 
  CIBA to for...
Staff Psychiatrist at 
roland kuhn         Münsterlingen ‐ Head of 
                    Pharmacologic Initiatives
        ...
THIS AIN’T NO SLEEPING PILL

Kuhn to Domenjoz: 
  “This is no sleeping pill, but (it) has 
   curious effects on chronic 
...
1953 KUHN GETS FREE 
  CHLORPROMAZINE FOR SIX MONTHS

   Münsterlingen received a 
        Largactil gratis
Kuhn: 
       ...
R‐P SAYS “YOU GOT TO START 
           PAYING”
Kuhn (paraphrasing): After six months an 
R‐P rep said that the trial phase...
MÜNSTERLINGEN CAN’T AFFORD −
KUHN REMEMBERS GEIGY’S DRUG

Kuhn to boss: “You know, I’ve 
seen all this with a drug from 
G...
G22350 DOESN’T COMPARE 
       TO LARGACTIL
Unpleasant side effects and not as 
efficacious as Largactil
Kuhn to Geigy che...
THE MAJORITY OF PATIENTS 
    WORSENED ON G22355
Kuhn’s verdict: “Not so good” as a neuroleptic, 
but worked on endogenous...
1955 KUHN GIVES G22355 TO 
   40 DEPRESSED PATIENTS 
“Patients become generally more lively; their low 
     depressive vo...
1955 KUHN GIVES G22355 TO 
   40 DEPRESSED PATIENTS 
Kuhn told of patients who were ready to 
jump out of bed in the morni...
G22355 GET SHELVED?
It’s important to note that Geigy was 
searching for a neuroleptic to compete 
with Largactil
Resistan...
INFLUENTIAL GEIGY SHAREHOLDER 
        ALTERS THE COURSE
Robert Böhringer was very influential within 
the company
Had pen...
BÖHRINGER: “KUHN IS RIGHT 
  − IT IS AN ANTIDEPRESSIVE”
• Geigy introduces drug in Switzerland
• 1957 Kuhn presents remark...
1958 GEIGY NAMES G22355 
        “IMIPRAMINE”
• Imipramine was the first 
  “tricyclic” because of its 3‐ring 
  chemical ...
Berlin psychiatrist refugee from Nazi 
  heinz   Germany, working in hospital in 
          Montréal
lehmann   Author of o...
heinz   Lehmann published his 
          results with imipramine 
lehmann   in the Canadian Med 
          Assoc J
       ...
1959
imipramine 
approved by FDA 
for the treatment 
of depression 

1961 
Rival TCA’s flood 
the market
1959: Imipramine’s MOA Still 
            Unknown

Jacobsen (1959): “Where the effect of 
imipramine…is still a complete r...
• Found enzyme 
julius axelrod          COMT
                      • Discovered the 
                        P‐450 system ...
Where Did the NE Go?
Studies showed NE was inactivated 
even when COMT and MOA were 
inhibited suggesting it was removed 
...
Ignorance Isn’t Always 
          a Bad Thing
Reuptake? Pharmacologic theory 
at the time never considered such a 
mechani...
1961    Infused 
        radiolabeled NE 
        injected into 
        animals is found in 
        sympathetic fibers

...
Gave imipramine to      1961
cats and measured 
the concentration of 
injected [3H]‐NE
in various tissues.

 Imipramine Bl...
joseph j. 
schildkraut




       Groundbreaking 1965 paper 
       proposed the catecholamine 
       hypothesis of depre...
joseph j.     The catecholamine hypothesis of 
schildkraut   affective disorders proposes that if 
              some, if ...
TUBERCULOSIS LEADS 
 TO AN UNEXPECTED 
     DISCOVERY
1951 IPRONIAZID 
       SYNTHESIZED

       Like isoniazid, 
iproniazid was found to be 
      tuberculostatic
Legendary Photo
Associated Press photo with patients dancing 
and clapping a Staten Island TB sanitarium. 
The caption und...
IPRONIAZID INHIBITS
     MONOAMINE OXIDASE
• Zeller et al. had earlier discovered 
  that anti‐TB drugs inhibited diamine ...
DELAY & DENIKER

            PARIS, 1951
• Delay and Deniker (of 
  chlorpromazine fame) purport 
  isoniazid’s “antidepre...
nathan        The first to 
              show that 
                             1954
kline, md     reserpine could be 
 ...
Roche Not Interested
                Concerns regarding side
                effects
Rockland Hospital physician asks Klin...
Kline administered 
nathan        iproniazid to these 17 
kline, md     inpatients and 9 of his 
              clinic outp...
STILL NOT IMPRESSED

Roche remained unenthusiastic but 
eventually acquiesced when Kline 
threatened to publish his result...
Kline reports the beneficial 
nathan           effects of iproniazid, an 
kline, md        MAOI, in the treatment of 
    ...
A side effect of an anti‐
tuberculosis drug may have 
led the way to chemical 
therapy for the unreachable, 
severely depr...
Dropped like a hot potato after 
1951 trials against tuberculosis 
because of admittedly unpleasant 
and possibly serious ...
IPRONIAZID’S FATE
• 1959 Phenelzine (Nardil) Approved By 
  the FDA
• 1961 iproniazid (Marsilid) withdrawn as 
  being too...
IN SEARCH OF A 
BETTER ANTIBIOTIC
Frank Berger at Wallace working 
on synthetic bactericidal 
compounds effective against 
penicillin‐resistant gram‐
negati...
CARTER-WALLACE

Specialized In OTC Meds

      Carter’s Little
       Liver Pills
“When you feel sour and sunk,
 and the w...
MEPHENESIN SYNTHESIZED
The disinfectant phenoxetol was believed 
to be effective in combating gram‐negative 
rods

Phenoxe...
MEPHENESIN PARALYZES 
           MICE
During safety tests, mice developed a 
reversible flaccid paralysis of the 
voluntar...
MEPHENESIN PARALYZES 
            MICE
Autonomic nervous system unaffected 
Recovery was spontaneous and complete in an 
h...
Mephenesin introduced as a muscle 
   relaxer for use in anesthesia

Mephenesin was first introduced in clinical 
practice...
Mephenesin’s Use Was Limited 
 By Three Significant Drawbacks

   A very short duration of action
   Greater effect on the...
BERGER SOUGHT TO DELAY 
  MEPHENESIN’S RAPID BREAKDOWN

He found that its short duration 
 of action was due to the rapid ...
1951 MEPROBAMATE 
           SYNTHESIZED
MEPROBAMATE’S ADVANTAGES 
OVER MEPHENESIN
•More stable
•Duration of action 8X lon...
“MILTOWN”

Berger christened meprobamate 
“Miltown” after the New Jersey 
 town Wallace laboratories was 
           locat...
Wallace withholds financial 
   support to market Miltown
• Carter‐Wallace initially wouldn’t give Berger 
  financial sup...
WALLACE SHELVES 
       MEPROBAMATE
Carter‐Wallace doubted there would 
 be a viable pharmaceutical anxiety 
drug market a...
WALLACE SHELVES 
        MEPROBAMATE
 Wallace had a change of heart only after 
         the phenomenal success of 
chlorp...
1955 MILTOWN’S DEBUT

Berger shows Miltown film at 
  the 1955 meeting of the 
   federation of American 
 Societies for E...
FILM SHOWED MONKEYS IN THREE 
DISTINCT CHEMICAL STATES
  Naturally vicious           We
                                  ...
WYETH BUYS RIGHTS TO 
      MARKET AS “EQUANIL”
• The first drug to be 
  sold specifically as 
  an anxiolytic 
• Touted ...
THE LAUNCHING OF MILTOWN 
  IN 1955 WAS A WATERSHED
             1957
 35 million prescriptions sold
 One prescription per...
HAPPINESS BY 
                                  PRESCRIPTION
“The use of tranquilizers has spread to the masses 
of…neurot...
HAPPINESS BY 
                       PRESCRIPTION
Busy Beverly Hills Psychiatrist confesses 
that he sometimes pops down a...
THE NON 
                      NARCOTIC ADDICTS

1965 article highlighting medical 
community’s recent discovery that so‐
...
Comedian 
Milton Berle: 
  “It’s worked 
  wonders for me. 
  In fact, I’m 
  thinking of 
  changing my 
  name to Miltow...
“MILTOWN” BECOMES A HOUSEHOLD 
   NAME & PART OF THE CULTURAL LEXICON

•“Penicillin for the      In New York, the drug’s 
...
ADVICE FROM MEDIA
The Hollywood tabloid 
Uncensored! reassured patients 
they could take Miltown and 
Equanil with confide...
MEPROBAMATE 
         PHARMACOLOGY
• Meprobamate does not affect 
  benzodiazepine or GABA receptors. 
• It appears to act...
SIDE EFFECTS
The major side effects are sedation and 
mal‐coordination. 
Toxic in high doses
Less lethal than intermediate...
SIDE EFFECTS
Produces physical dependence and 
tolerance similar to barbiturates and the 
benzodiazepines.

Significant wi...
POST‐MILTOWN: 
       BENZODIAZEPINES
Hoffmann – La Roche, New Jersey 
Leo Sternbach’s synthesis of the 
first benzodiazep...
TESTING LIBRIUM
Tested on a European lynx 
(noted to be among the least 
tractable animals in captivity) 
in San Diego Zoo...
ALSO TESTED ON 
PRISONERS


    “Classic psychopathic personalities with 
    lifelong histories of antisocial behavior 
 ...
1960: LIBRIUM LAUNCHED
ROCHE’S CLAIMS:
“Librium acts by allaying rage and anxiety
reactions without causing drowsiness or ...
Questions?  
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.

4,781 views

Published on

Grand rounds presentation reviewing the history of the development of the first antidepressants (imipramine and iproniazid) and the blockbuster anxiety medication, meprobamate (Miltown). Part two of a two-part presentation.

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,781
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
22
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
113
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Psychopharmacologic Advances of the 1950s, Part 2: Imipramine, iproniazid and meprobamate.

  1. 1. Kevin Nasky, DO
  2. 2. WHAT DID WE KNOW IN  1950? Not much.
  3. 3. WHAT DID WE KNOW IN  1950? ⎯ Brain was thought to be entirely  electrical ⎯ Acetylcholine was the only  known neurotransmitter ⎯ Knew acetylcholine was  inactivated by choline esterase
  4. 4. DISCOVERED BEFORE 1950 ⎯ Existence of serotonin in platelets ⎯ LSD (that it was a hallucinogen and  that it was chemically related to  5HT) ⎯ The enzyme that oxidized  adrenaline: “Amine Oxidase” ⎯ Antihistamines
  5. 5. “When I was an undergraduate  1950 student at Cambridge (late  50s) we were taught…there  was no chemical transmission  in the brain… ⎯ that it was just an electrical machine” Pharmacologist Leslie Iverson, Professor emeritus, U. of Oxford Neurotransmission was  thought to be an entirely  electrical phenomena
  6. 6. “When I was an undergraduate  1950 student at Cambridge (late  50s) we were taught…there  was no chemical transmission  in the brain… ⎯ that it was just an electrical machine” Pharmacologist Leslie Iverson, Professor emeritus, U. of Oxford Neurotransmission was  thought to be an entirely  electrical phenomena
  7. 7. 1950 Acetylcholine was known to be a  neurotransmitter, but in the  peripheral nervous system only
  8. 8. WHAT DIDN’T WE KNOW IN  1950? A lot.
  9. 9. WHAT DIDN’T WE KNOW IN  1950? For example…
  10. 10. …as late as 1960,  (now Nobel  laureate) Arvid Carlsson was  practically laughed  out of town when  he proposed that  dopamine might be  a neurotransmitter.
  11. 11. WHAT DIDN’T WE KNOW IN  1950? Since neurotransmitters were not  even understood to play any role  in the CNS, there was virtually no  basis to understand the  astounding clinical findings  revealed in the decade ahead.
  12. 12. THE CONCEPT OF AN ANTIPSYCHOTIC OR  AN ANTIDEPRESSANT DID NOT EXIST
  13. 13. HOW WERE WE TREATING  MENTAL ILLNESS IN 1950? Most  “treatments” were simply  measures to  sedate patients in  overcrowded  asylums.
  14. 14. Physical Methods
  15. 15. Insulin  coma Leucotomy ECT
  16. 16. Psychotropic Methods Bromides Barbiturates Paraldehyde Opioids
  17. 17. TREATMENTS OF CHOICE Psychosis Insulin Coma Deep Sleep Depression ECT Opioids Anxiety Various meds Leukotomy
  18. 18. A QUICK REVIEW… Chlorpromazine and  Reserpine
  19. 19. IN SEARCH OF BETTER  ANTIHISTAMINES
  20. 20. Speaking of Antihistamines… What do Benadryl,  Phenergan,  Thorazine and Tofranil  have in common?
  21. 21. Speaking of Antihistamines… Definitely not their  indications: allergies, nausea,  psychosis and depression,  respectively.
  22. 22. A (very) short course in the  chemistry of antihistamines:  How Benadryl became Thorazine  (well, sort of)
  23. 23. HOW DO YOU MAKE AN  ANTIHISTAMINE? Simple. 4 Easy Steps…
  24. 24. Start with a substituted ethyl amine Substitute methyl or other short alkyl groups in R1  and R2 X = C, O or N Add an aryl group at R3 and R4
  25. 25. Example:  diphenhydramine X = oxygen Aryl groups  at R3 & R4 Methyl groups  at R1 & R2
  26. 26. henri Experimented with various  phenothiazine anti‐ laborit histamines in his lytic  cocktails to reduce  analgesia required in  effort to reduce  surgical shock
  27. 27. paul Charpentier  charpentier synthesized a series of  phenothiazines that  Rhône‐Poulenc  were strongly  chemist antihistaminergic. phenothiazine  The most prominent of  expert synthesized the first  these was  tricyclic  promethazine antihistamine,  promethazine
  28. 28. Promethazine fits the classic  structure of an antihistamine
  29. 29. Flight Plan for Anesthetic Objective “…like a conscientious airman [the anesthesiologist] previously has filed a flight plan that, when carefully followed, leads to the objective…” To relieve apprehension To produce light sleep To reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting
  30. 30. Laborit wonders if there’s an even  better compound than promethazine  for his quot;lytic cocktailquot; Patients given  promethazine  were more  calmer after  surgery,  needed less post‐op  morphine and anesthesia
  31. 31. henri Laborit asks laborit Rhône‐Poulenc to  make a more  centrally‐acting  antihistamine
  32. 32. PROMAZINE propyl (3‐carbon alkyl) Replaced isopropyl group with a  straight carbon chain propyl
  33. 33. Laborit has good results with  Promazine, but said it was too weak.  Asks Charpentier: Can you make  me a stronger Promazine?
  34. 34. HOW DO YOU MAKE  PROMAZINE MORE POTENT? It was well known that  adding a halogen to an  organic molecule usually  increased its potency and  toxicity…
  35. 35. so Charpentier added  one chloride atom to  Promazine and forever  changed psychiatry. CHLORpromazine
  36. 36. BTW… Replace one sulfur atom…
  37. 37. …with an ethylene linkage, preventing  formation of the benzene ring and you get
  38. 38. imipramine
  39. 39. “ME TOO” DRUGS •Replace the chlorine in  chlorpromazine with a  trifluoromethyl group, and you  get trifluoperazine (Stelazine). •Add a terminal ethyl alcohol  group to trifluoperazine and you  have fluphenazine (Prolixin).
  40. 40. “ME TOO” DRUGS Further manipulation of  this molecular structure  yielded numerous other  agents with antipsychotic  activity.
  41. 41. CHLORPROMAZINE Summary (short version)
  42. 42. A TRANQUILIZING  ANTIHYPERTENSIVE  (that eventually makes you  depressed)
  43. 43. RESERPINE SUMMARY Derived from Rauwolfia Serpentina Commonly used antihypertensive in early  1950s Noted to have tranquilizing effects Nathan Kline (of iproniazid fame)  published a study in 1954 showing  reserpine’s effectiveness in treating  psychosis
  44. 44. Ciba  markets  “Serpasil” I couldn’t  resist the  urge to  show this  slide again
  45. 45. …acts as a gentle mood‐ leveling agent…sets up needed  ‘tranquility barrier’ for many  patients who, without some  help, are incapable of dealing  calmly with a daily pile‐up of  stressful situations.
  46. 46. Alternative to Serpasil for  Mom Give the boy…
  47. 47. ..a bowl of 
  48. 48. Reserpine’s popularity  fades After a short‐lived popularity  from 1954 to 1957, the use of  reserpine rapidly declined after  reports of patients becoming  depressed and suicidal
  49. 49. Reserpine’s Relevance Large contribution to eventual  development of catecholamine  hypothesis of depression and  dopamine hypothesis of  psychosis
  50. 50. bernard Brodie at NIH found that  ‘steve’ the brains of animals given  brodie reserpine had very low  levels of 5HT and NE Suggested that reserpine  inactivates a mechanism to  essential for 5HT storage first demonstration of a link  between brain chemistry  and behavior
  51. 51. Reserpine’s Mechanism Inhibits ATP/Mg2+ pump  responsible for the reuptake of  NT into presynaptic vesicles Results in NE and 5HT  depletion
  52. 52. A FAILED SLEEP AID  AND ANTIPSYCHOTIC
  53. 53. Häfliger and Schinder Synthesize Imipramine
  54. 54. J.R. GEIGY PHARMACEUTICAL  FIRM Swiss firm founded in 1758 Geigy later merged with Swiss firm  CIBA to form Ciba‐Geigy in 1970 Ciba‐Geigy and Sandoz Laboratories  merge in 1996 to form Novartis
  55. 55. Staff Psychiatrist at  roland kuhn Münsterlingen ‐ Head of  Pharmacologic Initiatives Background in biochemistry,  organic chemistry, and  psychoanalysis Trained under Jakob Klaesi (“prolonged sleep therapy,” “deep sleep cure”) Geigy pharmacologist,  Domenjoz, asks Kuhn to try  new ‘sleeping pill’: G22150
  56. 56. THIS AIN’T NO SLEEPING PILL Kuhn to Domenjoz:  “This is no sleeping pill, but (it) has  curious effects on chronic  schizophrenics − not on their  sleeping pattern, but on their  schizophrenic symptoms.”
  57. 57. 1953 KUHN GETS FREE  CHLORPROMAZINE FOR SIX MONTHS Münsterlingen received a  Largactil gratis Kuhn:  “The whole clinic was  swallowing Largactil”
  58. 58. R‐P SAYS “YOU GOT TO START  PAYING” Kuhn (paraphrasing): After six months an  R‐P rep said that the trial phase was over,  and now we’d have to pay Münsterlingen’s pharmacy budget was  6000 Swiss Francs per year, which was  needed foremost for morphine and  scopolamine
  59. 59. MÜNSTERLINGEN CAN’T AFFORD − KUHN REMEMBERS GEIGY’S DRUG Kuhn to boss: “You know, I’ve  seen all this with a drug from  Geigy” Kuhn gets “huge bottles” of  G22350 from Geigy
  60. 60. G22350 DOESN’T COMPARE  TO LARGACTIL Unpleasant side effects and not as  efficacious as Largactil Kuhn to Geigy chemist: “You  should use the same side chain as  Largactil.” Substance already existed: G22355
  61. 61. THE MAJORITY OF PATIENTS  WORSENED ON G22355 Kuhn’s verdict: “Not so good” as a neuroleptic,  but worked on endogenous depression G22355 had a disinhibitory effect, “almost  manic” “Converting quiet chronic patients into agitated  whirlwinds of energy” Kuhn & Geigy scientists confused: Why such a  bizarre response?
  62. 62. 1955 KUHN GIVES G22355 TO  40 DEPRESSED PATIENTS  “Patients become generally more lively; their low  depressive voices sound stronger. (They)  appear more communicative, the yammering  and crying come to an end. If the depression  had manifested itself in a dissatisfied, plaintive,  or irritable mood, a friendly, contented and  accessible spirit comes to the fore.  Hypochondriacal and neurasthenic complaints  recede or disappear entirely.”
  63. 63. 1955 KUHN GIVES G22355 TO  40 DEPRESSED PATIENTS  Kuhn told of patients who were ready to  jump out of bed in the morning, to  socialize easily with fellow patients… “…to amuse themselves and take part in the  general life of the hospital, to write letters  and interest themselves again in their family  circumstances.”
  64. 64. G22355 GET SHELVED? It’s important to note that Geigy was  searching for a neuroleptic to compete  with Largactil Resistance stemmed from the thinking that if  there was going to be an effective antidepressant  (“psychic energizer”), that it would be a  stimulant and not a sedative − the idea that a  “sedative” could work as an antidepressant was  counterintuitive.
  65. 65. INFLUENTIAL GEIGY SHAREHOLDER  ALTERS THE COURSE Robert Böhringer was very influential within  the company Had penchant for roaming about company  asking people what they were working on Had a depressed relative − knew about  G22355 − took some to her and she was  “cured” in five days
  66. 66. BÖHRINGER: “KUHN IS RIGHT  − IT IS AN ANTIDEPRESSIVE” • Geigy introduces drug in Switzerland • 1957 Kuhn presents remarkably positive  results of trial to 2nd international  congress of psychiatrists in Zürich • Only 12 people in attendance • “Nobody believed there could be a drug   against depression.”
  67. 67. 1958 GEIGY NAMES G22355  “IMIPRAMINE” • Imipramine was the first  “tricyclic” because of its 3‐ring  chemical structure • Chlorpromazine molecule only 2  atoms different
  68. 68. Berlin psychiatrist refugee from Nazi  heinz Germany, working in hospital in  Montréal lehmann Author of one of the first North  American papers on CPZ Never owned a car, cycled  everywhere “No one in his right mind  in psychiatry was  working with drugs. You  working with drugs used shock or various  psychotherapiesquot;
  69. 69. heinz Lehmann published his  results with imipramine  lehmann in the Canadian Med  Assoc J Impressed with Kuhn’s  article, he obtained enough  samples of imipramine by  airmail to treat depressed  patients with equally good  results. 
  70. 70. 1959 imipramine  approved by FDA  for the treatment  of depression  1961  Rival TCA’s flood  the market
  71. 71. 1959: Imipramine’s MOA Still  Unknown Jacobsen (1959): “Where the effect of  imipramine…is still a complete riddle  which must await elucidation. Here  our present ignorance is such that not  even a preliminary hypothesis can be  offered.” Jacobsen E: The theoretical basis of the chemotherapy of depression. Proceedings of the Symposium Held at Cambridge, 22 to 26 September,  1959, edited by Davies EB. New York, Cambridge University Press, 1964
  72. 72. • Found enzyme  julius axelrod COMT • Discovered the  P‐450 system  • Nobel Prize 1970 “For discoveries concerning the  humoral transmitters in the nerve  terminals and the mechanism for  their storage, release and  inactivation.quot;
  73. 73. Where Did the NE Go? Studies showed NE was inactivated  even when COMT and MOA were  inhibited suggesting it was removed  some other way. Where did the rest of it go? Axelrod proposes there’s a  reuptake pump in nerve endings
  74. 74. Ignorance Isn’t Always  a Bad Thing Reuptake? Pharmacologic theory  at the time never considered such a  mechanism existed. Axelrod later admitted that if he’d  known more about pharmacology  he would have never considered the  idea.
  75. 75. 1961 Infused  radiolabeled NE  injected into  animals is found in  sympathetic fibers Axelrod Proves that a  Reuptake Mechanism Exists
  76. 76. Gave imipramine to  1961 cats and measured  the concentration of  injected [3H]‐NE in various tissues. Imipramine Blocked the  Reuptake of [3H]‐NE
  77. 77. joseph j.  schildkraut Groundbreaking 1965 paper  proposed the catecholamine  hypothesis of depression. 
  78. 78. joseph j.  The catecholamine hypothesis of  schildkraut affective disorders proposes that if  some, if not all, depressions  are associated with an  absolute or relative  decrease in catechol‐ amines, particularly  norepinephrine, available central  adrenergic receptor sites. Elation,  conversely, may be associated  with an excess of such amines.”
  79. 79. TUBERCULOSIS LEADS  TO AN UNEXPECTED  DISCOVERY
  80. 80. 1951 IPRONIAZID  SYNTHESIZED Like isoniazid,  iproniazid was found to be  tuberculostatic
  81. 81. Legendary Photo Associated Press photo with patients dancing  and clapping a Staten Island TB sanitarium.  The caption under the photo supposedly  referenced their recovery from TB as the  reason for their levity, but others felt their  mood was more related to one of the drugs  they had been given – iproniazid. 
  82. 82. IPRONIAZID INHIBITS MONOAMINE OXIDASE • Zeller et al. had earlier discovered  that anti‐TB drugs inhibited diamine  oxidase • Also discovered that iproniazid (but  not isoniazid) also inhibits monoamine oxidase
  83. 83. DELAY & DENIKER PARIS, 1951 • Delay and Deniker (of  chlorpromazine fame) purport  isoniazid’s “antidepressant” effects  at Société Médico‐Psychologique • Never claimed credit for discovering  antidepressants despite (?)
  84. 84. nathan The first to  show that  1954 kline, md reserpine could be  useful for treating  psychoses Asked Roche to fund study  of iproniazid in psychotic  patients
  85. 85. Roche Not Interested Concerns regarding side effects Rockland Hospital physician asks Kline if he had  any ideas how to help “regressed” inpatients  who had failed reserpine and chlorpromazine
  86. 86. Kline administered  nathan iproniazid to these 17  kline, md inpatients and 9 of his  clinic outpatients “The drug…has produced  ‘remarkable’ mood  improvement and activity  among long‐term ‘untouchable’ psychotics of the ‘burned‐out’ kind as well as among non‐ hospitalized neurotics”
  87. 87. STILL NOT IMPRESSED Roche remained unenthusiastic but  eventually acquiesced when Kline  threatened to publish his results  anyway − as publicly as possible
  88. 88. Kline reports the beneficial  nathan effects of iproniazid, an  kline, md MAOI, in the treatment of  severe depression “As a side effect…there developed an  odd problem. The patients felt too  good…overexerting themselves and… ignoring the medical safeguards their  condition required. Iproniazid’s  potential as a mood drug had gone  largely unnoticed because psychiatrists  at the time just weren’t thinking along  those lines.”
  89. 89. A side effect of an anti‐ tuberculosis drug may have  led the way to chemical  therapy for the unreachable,  severely depressed mental  patient.. Dr. Nathan S.  Kline… described the action  of the drug as a kind of  quot;psychic energizer.quot;
  90. 90. Dropped like a hot potato after  1951 trials against tuberculosis  because of admittedly unpleasant  and possibly serious side effects,  iproniazid was shunned until about  a year ago, when psychiatrists  decided that it might be useful  against deep, unshakable states of  depression.
  91. 91. IPRONIAZID’S FATE • 1959 Phenelzine (Nardil) Approved By  the FDA • 1961 iproniazid (Marsilid) withdrawn as  being too hepatotoxic for clinical use • 1964 Kline receives second Lasker award
  92. 92. IN SEARCH OF A  BETTER ANTIBIOTIC
  93. 93. Frank Berger at Wallace working  on synthetic bactericidal  compounds effective against  penicillin‐resistant gram‐ negative bacteria
  94. 94. CARTER-WALLACE Specialized In OTC Meds Carter’s Little Liver Pills “When you feel sour and sunk, and the world looks punk . . . Take a Carter’s Little Liver Pill.” In 1951 the FTC told Carter-Wallace to cut the word “liver” out of the product name
  95. 95. MEPHENESIN SYNTHESIZED The disinfectant phenoxetol was believed  to be effective in combating gram‐negative  rods Phenoxetol’s carbon chain was lengthened  to produce mephenesin, which showed  some efficacy
  96. 96. MEPHENESIN PARALYZES  MICE During safety tests, mice developed a  reversible flaccid paralysis of the  voluntary skeletal muscles •Vital functions preserved •Remained conscious •Responded to painful stimuli •Corneal reflex was preserved 
  97. 97. MEPHENESIN PARALYZES  MICE Autonomic nervous system unaffected  Recovery was spontaneous and complete in an  hour Unlike barbiturates it had a  quieting effect on the demeanor of animals without a stage of initial excitement This effect was termed “tranquilization” by the  team in their first publication of this finding
  98. 98. Mephenesin introduced as a muscle  relaxer for use in anesthesia Mephenesin was first introduced in clinical  practice as an agent for producing muscle  relaxation during light anesthesia by  Mallison in 1947 as an alternative to  tubocurarine Its anti‐anxiety effect was recognized only  in brief case reports
  99. 99. Mephenesin’s Use Was Limited  By Three Significant Drawbacks A very short duration of action Greater effect on the spinal cord  than on supra‐spinal structures Weak action so that large doses  were required
  100. 100. BERGER SOUGHT TO DELAY  MEPHENESIN’S RAPID BREAKDOWN He found that its short duration  of action was due to the rapid  oxidation so he synthesized  various derivatives that were  less susceptible to enzymatic  attack
  101. 101. 1951 MEPROBAMATE  SYNTHESIZED MEPROBAMATE’S ADVANTAGES  OVER MEPHENESIN •More stable •Duration of action 8X longer •Readily absorbed from the GI tract •Had tranquilizing effect on monkeys so that  they lost their viciousness and could be more  easily handled
  102. 102. “MILTOWN” Berger christened meprobamate  “Miltown” after the New Jersey  town Wallace laboratories was  located in.
  103. 103. Wallace withholds financial  support to market Miltown • Carter‐Wallace initially wouldn’t give Berger  financial support ($500,000) to bring the  meprobamate to market • There was no preexisting market for  prescription‐only tranquilizers • Wallace conducted a survey of 200 doctors to  gauge interest in prescription anxiolytics − the  majority of respondents expressed little  interest
  104. 104. WALLACE SHELVES  MEPROBAMATE Carter‐Wallace doubted there would  be a viable pharmaceutical anxiety  drug market and what would later be  the best‐selling psychotropic drug  in American history was, for the  time being, shelved.
  105. 105. WALLACE SHELVES  MEPROBAMATE Wallace had a change of heart only after  the phenomenal success of  chlorpromazine in 1953 and meprobamate  resurfaced from hibernation that year as  the American answer to the French  chlorpromazine albeit with a marketing  strategy that focused on a different  clientele! − The Healthy “Unwell.”
  106. 106. 1955 MILTOWN’S DEBUT Berger shows Miltown film at  the 1955 meeting of the  federation of American  Societies for Experimental  Biology in San Francisco
  107. 107. FILM SHOWED MONKEYS IN THREE  DISTINCT CHEMICAL STATES Naturally vicious We  Lov Unconscious on  Mil e  barbiturates tow n! Calm but awake on  Miltown Film caught the attention  of Wyeth executives
  108. 108. WYETH BUYS RIGHTS TO  MARKET AS “EQUANIL” • The first drug to be  sold specifically as  an anxiolytic  • Touted as able to  ameliorate anxiety  but not sedating
  109. 109. THE LAUNCHING OF MILTOWN  IN 1955 WAS A WATERSHED 1957 35 million prescriptions sold One prescription per second Fastest‐growing drug in history
  110. 110. HAPPINESS BY  PRESCRIPTION “The use of tranquilizers has spread to the masses  of…neurotics and (others) vexed with problems and  pressures.” Due to state laws permitting unlimited refills… “Miltown (was) the hottest (item) in many…big city    pharmacies.” Family practice physician quoted: “The physician knows that if he doesn’t give them someone  else will…Only a small number of people can get psychiatric  help, so a lot of emotional problems are thrown back to the  family physician; he turns to tranquilizers that he might not  use if he had more time.”
  111. 111. HAPPINESS BY  PRESCRIPTION Busy Beverly Hills Psychiatrist confesses  that he sometimes pops down a  tranquilizer himself to prepare for the  nerve‐wrenching drive home from the  office: “I wish the government would subsidize  slot machines for tranquilizers on every  corner.”
  112. 112. THE NON  NARCOTIC ADDICTS 1965 article highlighting medical  community’s recent discovery that so‐ called “minor tranquilizers,” e.g.  barbiturates, meprobamate,  chlordiazepoxide and amphetamines are  as potentially addictive as narcotics and  can lead to intoxication and dependence
  113. 113. Comedian  Milton Berle:  “It’s worked  wonders for me.  In fact, I’m  thinking of  changing my  name to Miltown  Berle.”
  114. 114. “MILTOWN” BECOMES A HOUSEHOLD  NAME & PART OF THE CULTURAL LEXICON •“Penicillin for the    In New York, the drug’s  blues” fanatical following among  •“Miltown‐ing” the white‐collar weary  earned it the nickname  •“Miltown cocktails” “executive Excedrin” •“dehydrated martini” “Happy pill” alternative  •“peace pills” for harried housewives  •“happiness pills and stressed‐out  •“emotional aspirin” commuters Tranquilizer for the  healthy “unwell”
  115. 115. ADVICE FROM MEDIA The Hollywood tabloid  Uncensored! reassured patients  they could take Miltown and  Equanil with confidence because  “They are not habit forming and  even a severe overdose can’t kill  you.”
  116. 116. MEPROBAMATE  PHARMACOLOGY • Meprobamate does not affect  benzodiazepine or GABA receptors.  • It appears to act by potentiating the  action of endogenously released  adenosine; it blocks reuptake of  adenosine, which is itself a sedative
  117. 117. SIDE EFFECTS The major side effects are sedation and  mal‐coordination.  Toxic in high doses Less lethal than intermediate‐acting  barbiturates A good deal more dangerous than  benzodiazepines
  118. 118. SIDE EFFECTS Produces physical dependence and  tolerance similar to barbiturates and the  benzodiazepines. Significant withdrawal effects, such as  convulsions, agitation, and delirium, occur  after clinically relatively lower doses
  119. 119. POST‐MILTOWN:  BENZODIAZEPINES Hoffmann – La Roche, New Jersey  Leo Sternbach’s synthesis of the  first benzodiazepines was inspired  by chiorpromazine’s tricycic structure 
  120. 120. TESTING LIBRIUM Tested on a European lynx  (noted to be among the least  tractable animals in captivity)  in San Diego Zoo that had  bloodied its nose in a savage  dash against the side of its  cage was treated with  Librium and soon after was  frolicking “like an alley  kitten.”
  121. 121. ALSO TESTED ON  PRISONERS “Classic psychopathic personalities with  lifelong histories of antisocial behavior  [who were formerly] mutilating  themselves, setting fires and starting  fights [on Librium became] placid and  alert, despite their tension‐provoking  environment.”
  122. 122. 1960: LIBRIUM LAUNCHED ROCHE’S CLAIMS: “Librium acts by allaying rage and anxiety reactions without causing drowsiness or  depressing mental activity.” “Produces pure relief from strain without  drowsiness or dulling of mental  processes…and unusual freedom from  harmful side effects.”
  123. 123. Questions?  

×