Veterans in San Diego: Diversity Awareness<br />9/20/2011<br />Kristen Mulvihill<br />
Diversity: Why Veterans?<br />Unique group with unique cultural experiences<br />Isolation experienced after leaving the m...
Veterans in San Diego<br />600,000 veterans seek services in San Diego<br />New battlefield medicine yields more survivors...
Veterans in San Diego<br />1,929,572 veterans in the state of California<br />24.6% of CA veterans are considered disabled...
Considerations for San Diego Public Libraries<br />Veterans can feel like a minority when leaving the service<br />Not all...
Veterans and Public Libraries<br />Veterans need to connect with other veterans<br />Provide space for groups to organize ...
Low-Cost Possibilities<br />Pathfinder or LibGuide<br />Binder at Reference Desk<br />Links or page on website<br />Networ...
Information Resources: Organized by Librarians<br />High-priority hotlines and immediate resources for acute mental health...
Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
Recommended Works: Nonfiction<br />Nonfiction:<br />The following works provide information about coping with physical dis...
Recommended Books: Fiction<br />Fiction: The following online resources provide book reviews, discussions, and recommendat...
Recommended Works: Online<br />Community Organizations, Websites, and Online Resources:<br />Army Starrs (Study to Assess ...
And More<br />In addition to the works above, I recommend a recent article published in Library Journal where the “wounded...
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Veterans and public libraries in san diego

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Preliminary look at the need for public libraries to provide information resources to veterans in San Diego.

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  • Glad to hear this presentation was helpful to you. It's been a long time since I looked at this presentation. If you are interested, please feel free to attend a free Infopeople webinar on the topic: http://infopeople.org/training/veterans-and-public-libraries

    We will talk about the basics, and it is a good place to meet other librarians interested in serving the veteran community. Looking forward to talking to you again! KM
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  • Absolutely informative and much needed presentation!

    We are just starting to program at our library for the veterans in our community and this will start us in the right direction. Many thanks!!
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  • Loss of “family”Loss of “purpose”Loss of routineDisabilities
  • Recent revolutionary battlefield medical treatments have made it possible for soldiers, sailors, and marines to survive wounds in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflict areas that would have been fatal in any previous war. Recurring tours of duty in the Middle East have also caused active-duty military and veterans to experience fatigue from the cycle of coming and going to a war zone; and many experience post-traumatic stress syndrome or more subtle symptoms of mental health conditions. Additionally, veterans of previous wars are continuing to thrive in spite of physical disabilities, though they experience new challenges as they grow older. San Diego is the home of more than a dozen different naval bases (Welcome, 2010). The 600,000 veterans who seek services from the San Diego Regional Office (San Diego, n.d.) however, do not usually have access to these military installations. Veterans in San Diego, therefore, are part of the civilian population in their efforts to access information and seek assistance. Resources and facilities that specialize in veteran services are abundant in San Diego County, but information about their location and where to go first are almost over-abundant. Many veterans struggle to remember how to register or how to obtain military records that will validate their eligibility for veteran’s assistance. Mental health resources, a high-priority item for most agencies and advocates of veterans or disabled veterans, are difficult to locate in person. It would not be surprising, therefore, for veterans in San Diego to seek information assistance at a public library.This data was provided by the San Diego Regional Office website at the following URL: http://www2.va.gov/directory/guide/facility.asp?ID=266According to statistics compiled by the Cornell University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics, approximately 5.6% of the metropolitan population (all ages) in San Diego report physical disabilities (Cornell, 2010). This percentage does not include non-physical disabilities, such as sensory or developmental. The U.S. Census Bureau 2009 Community Survey reports that there are 1,929,572 veterans in the state of California, 24.6% of whom are considered disabled. As of 2009, 10.0% of California’s general population were reported to be disabled. Civilians aged 18 to 64 years old, however, comprised only 8.1% of the state’s population for that age group; and civilians aged 65 and over years old comprised 37.6% of the state’s population for that age group. These wide ranges in statistics require careful study in anticipating the need among veterans who live in different neighborhoods served by public libraries. Nevertheless, in thousands of dollars, 6,413,361 (more than $6 billion) in total expenditures are spent in San Diego, the third highest metropolitan area to receive Department of Defense expenditures in the country, next only to Fort Hood in Texas and Washington D.C. The investment by the Department of Defense in active duty military or contracted personnel, facilities, and planning represent a potential for development efforts by public libraries that could offer information services to their former employees.  224,215 California veterans receive disability compensation, and 33% of the male homeless population throughout the United States are veterans. In a 2006 study, California is home to 2.2 million veterans, 9.2% of veterans nationwide, and this state has the highest number of veterans in the country. In studying how to address unemployment in California, the state’s Department of Labor tasked a committee to study the highest-priority issues related to people who wish to return to work.Cornell University. (2010). Disability Statistics: Online Resource for U.S. Disability Statistics. Retrieved from the URL: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/edi/disabilitystatistics/reports/census.cfm5.5 million veterans in the U.S. had a disability in 2009, according to the 2009 American Community Survey. 3.3 million veterans nationwide had service-connected disability ratings. Of these numbers, 652,000 veterans had a severe disability rated 70% or higher and were eligible for significant benefits.U.S. Census Bureau, 2009 American Community Survey, American FactFinder, table B18101; http://factfinder.census.gov (accessed 28 September 2010).Table 505 of the Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2011, National Security and Veterans Affairs, U.S. Census Bureau, per U.S. Department of Defense, DoD Personnel and Procurement Statistics, Personnel, Publications, Atlas/Data Abstract for the United States and Selected Areas, annual, &lt;http://siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil/&gt;Veterans Benefits Administration Annual Benefits Report Fiscal Year 2005 released September 2006 ; National Coalition for Homeless Veterans.Demographic estimates of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs from a database used in the USDVA report on California Veterans.
  • In studying how to address unemployment in California, the state’s Department of Labor tasked a committee to study the highest-priority issues related to people who wish to return to work. In assessing the status of people with disabilities who wish to continue or return to work, the following observation was published in their report to the governor:On unemployment and veterans with disabilities who should return to work:t by Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, State of California
  • Veterans and public libraries in san diego

    1. 1. Veterans in San Diego: Diversity Awareness<br />9/20/2011<br />Kristen Mulvihill<br />
    2. 2. Diversity: Why Veterans?<br />Unique group with unique cultural experiences<br />Isolation experienced after leaving the military<br />Change in routine<br />Coworkers relocating elsewhere<br />Resources to connect with other veterans are abundant, yet…<br />
    3. 3. Veterans in San Diego<br />600,000 veterans seek services in San Diego<br />New battlefield medicine yields more survivors of trauma<br />Recurring tours of duty cause even more PTSD<br />Veterans of previous wars living longer<br />Ironically…<br />Venues where active duty military service members can socialize are easy to find in San Diego, but they are not so easy to access among veterans. Once they are separated from the service, admission to a military base is limited, depending on the status of the veteran.<br />
    4. 4. Veterans in San Diego<br />1,929,572 veterans in the state of California<br />24.6% of CA veterans are considered disabled<br />California has the highest number of veterans in the country<br />He or she will need some level of mental health services, and if not treated soon enough, alcohol and drug treatment also, in conjunction with assistance with affordable housing, legal, family and financial counseling… CA Dept of Labor<br />
    5. 5. Considerations for San Diego Public Libraries<br />Veterans can feel like a minority when leaving the service<br />Not all library staff will be knowledgeable about veterans<br />More than $6 billion in total expenditures are invested in DoD<br />
    6. 6. Veterans and Public Libraries<br />Veterans need to connect with other veterans<br />Provide space for groups to organize or information about other venues<br />Information is everywhere…..but not organized<br />Create pathfinder or webpage with prioritized links<br />Family and friends may need help coping with changes<br />Create book clubs or coordinate support groups<br />Transportation to medical facilities can be challenging without adequate knowledge of resources<br />Provide information about easy-to-access resources and benefits<br />
    7. 7. Low-Cost Possibilities<br />Pathfinder or LibGuide<br />Binder at Reference Desk<br />Links or page on website<br />Network with advocacy organizations<br />Veteran Museum in Balboa Park<br />U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program<br />Veterans Administration – Apply for Grants<br />
    8. 8. Information Resources: Organized by Librarians<br />High-priority hotlines and immediate resources for acute mental health conditions related to difficulties in transitioning or isolation resulting from the disability or separation from service;<br />List of resources for obtaining immediate assistance by organizations and Veterans Affairs facilities in San Diego;<br />Website links for obtaining military records and researching facilities in San Diego;<br />Online resources for connecting with other veterans and professionals through social media;<br />Bibliography of nonfiction: books about coping with disabilities;<br />Bibliotherapy: fiction recommendations regarding coping with disabilities;<br />Index to organizations that provide mental health services;<br />Index to locations for connecting with other veterans.<br />
    9. 9. Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
    10. 10. Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
    11. 11. Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
    12. 12. Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
    13. 13. Pathfinders – Some Examples<br />
    14. 14. Recommended Works: Nonfiction<br />Nonfiction:<br />The following works provide information about coping with physical disabilities, veterans and mental health issues, and specific techniques related to psychology and physical disabilities.  <br />Buchalter, S.I. (2011). Art therapy and creative coping techniques for older adults. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.<br />Coombs, J., & Sard, F. (1984). Living with the disabled: You can help : a family guide. New York: Sterling Pub. Co.<br />Couser, G. T. (1997). Recovering bodies: Illness, disability, and life-writing. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.<br />Cox-Gedmark, J. (1980). Coping with physical disability. Philadelphia: Westminster Press. <br />Frank, G. (2000). Venus on wheels: Two decades of dialogue on disability, biography, and being female in America. Berkeley, Calif: University of California Press.<br />Garland-Thomson, R. (1997). Extraordinary bodies: Figuring physical disability in American culture and literature. New York: Columbia University Press.<br />Hillyer, B. (1993). Feminism and disability. Norman, Okla: University of Oklahoma Press.<br />Hoge, C. W. (2010). Once a warrior, always a warrior: Navigating the transition from combat to home--including combat stress, PTSD, and mTBI. Guilford, Conn: GPP Life.<br />Marinelli, R. P., & Dell, O. A. E. (1999). The psychological and social impact of disability. New York: Springer Pub. Co.<br />McHugh, M. (2003). Special siblings: Growing up with someone with a disability. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.<br />Milam, L. W. (1993). CripZen: A manual for survival. San Diego, Calif: MHO & MHO Works.<br />Perske, R., & Perske, M. (1988). Circles of friends: People with disabilities and their friends enrich the lives of one another. Nashville: Abingdon Press.<br />Resources for Rehabilitation (Organization). (2003). A man's guide to coping with disability. Winchester, Mass: Resources for Rehabilitation.<br />Resources for Rehabilitation (Organization). (1994). A woman's guide to coping with disability. Lexington, Mass: Resources for Rehabilitation.<br />Seifter, J., & Seifter, B. (2010). After the diagnosis: Transcending chronic illness. New York: Simon & Schuster.<br />Shannon, J.B., ed. (2008). Disease management sourcebook : Basic consumer health information about coping with chronic and serious illnesses, navigating the health care system. Detroit: Omnigraphics.<br />Sirof, H. (1993). The road back: Living with a physical disability. New York: New Discovery Books.<br />Sullivan, M. B., Brightman, A., Blatt, J., Davis, M., & Bourke, L. (1979). Feeling free. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley.<br />Wehman, P. (2001). Life beyond the classroom: Transition strategies for young people with disabilities. Baltimore: P.H. Brookes Pub. Co.<br />
    15. 15. Recommended Books: Fiction<br />Fiction: The following online resources provide book reviews, discussions, and recommendations of fiction that integrates the theme of physical disabilities into the plot or character of the works described.<br />Kestrell. (n.d.) “Decloaking Disability Bibliography.” Blind Bookworm. Retrieved on August 9, 2011 from http://www.panix.com/~kestrell/DecloakingDisabilityBiblio.html<br />Kestrell is the pseudonym of the blogger whose homepage, Blind Bookworm, provides resources for accessible audiobooks and reading materials. This page, while described by the author as a work in progress, is quite an accomplishment. It lists fiction, film, and literary criticism with annotations that explain how the material adds to the efforts of portraying people with physical disabilities as one of many acceptable and interesting cultural groups. I do not list my own recommendations in this pathfinder after having discovered this website that has reviewed the material much more eloquently than I ever could. This is the best resource I have found for locating literature portraying people with disabilities.<br />Roberts, A. (2007, September 5). “Science fiction and physical handicap.” The Valve: a literary organ. Retrieved on August 12, 2011 from URL: http://www.thevalve.org/go/valve/article/science_fiction_and_physical_handicap<br />The writer uses this blog to collect recommendations of science fiction where there is a representation of a physical disability. Responses offer several good recommendations as well as comments on how the material was inspirational to the readers.<br />Stemp, J. (2004, Winter). “Devices and desires: science fiction, fantasy and disability in literature for young people.” Disability Studies Quarterly, (24)1. Retrieved on August 13, 2011 from URL: http://www.dsq-sds.org/article/view/850/1025<br />An author of fantasy and science fiction who has coped with chronic illness in her own life, Jane Stemp writes about well-written and poorly written science fiction, particularly works that helped her cope and filter her life experiences in living with chronic illness. Stemp follows the article with a list of recommended books.<br />
    16. 16. Recommended Works: Online<br />Community Organizations, Websites, and Online Resources:<br />Army Starrs (Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers). (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.armystarrs.org/<br />This is the partnership program between the Army and the National Institute for Mental Health. It provides information about mental health issues and resources. <br />Defense Centers for Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. (n.d.) 24/7 Outreach Center. Retrieved from http://www.dcoe.health.mil/24-7help.aspx<br />Provides email, telephone, and chat room resources for counseling, in addition to podcasts, a newsletter, and additional links for veterans and their families.<br />Military One Source. (2011). Counseling Options and Immediate Help. Retrieved from http://www.militaryonesource.com/MOS/About/CounselingServices.aspx<br />Offers resources to schedule face-to-face counseling, telephone counseling, or online counseling, in addition to a 24-hour hotline for suicide prevention.<br />National Institute of Mental Health. (2010, August 31) Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml<br />National Resource Directory. (n.d.) National Call Center for Homeless Veterans. (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.va.gov/HOMELESS/NationalCallCenter.asp<br />Connects homeless veterans to a chat room or hotline to ask questions about resources available by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Offers information about volunteer opportunities for veterans who are seeking less isolation.<br />Reviews the symptoms and available treatment of PTSD according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Provides links for veterans to seek assistance.<br />Paralympic Program. (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.va.gov/adaptivesports/<br />A new website dedicated to adaptive sports for veterans with disabilities. Provides resources, community links, and lists of activities where disabled veterans can connect with a community.<br />The Ragged Edge Magazine. (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.raggededgemagazine.com/<br />Website for the Ragged Edge, a periodical that advocates disability rights and provides educational resources, blogging and other social media resources for networking among veterans or others with disabilities.<br />“Replacing military records.” (n.d.) in United States Department of Veterans Affairs: Chapter 14: Military medals and records. Retrieved from http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/benefits_book/benefits_chap14.asp<br />This is the online resource for learning how to obtain the military records that verify a veteran’s eligibility for assistance. Visiting a local V.A. facility might be faster, now that most facility staff members are trained to provide immediate registration and orientation to any veteran who is claiming a need for assistance. Nevertheless, veterans who are unable to visit the nearest facility can use the resources on this web page to obtain their records to verify eligibility.<br />Suicide Prevention and Risk Reduction Committee. (n.d.) Resources for Suicide Prevention. Retrieved from http://www.suicideoutreach.org/’<br />United States Department of Veterans Affairs. (n.d.) Mental Health Resources. Retrieved from http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/<br />This is the primary website used for learning about individual and group therapy options available through the nearest V.A. Hospital. It connects visitors to general information about mental health as well as to hospital staff who can assist them by phone or through a chat room.<br />USO (United Service Organization), San Diego. (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.usosandiego.org/<br />The USO Downtown Centeris open every day of the year from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m to offer comfortable surroundings for active-duty military during their travels. This facility offers meeting space, free wi-fi, and entertainment equipment. Although it technically for active-duty personnel, veterans can volunteer at the facility in an effort to meet other veterans and military personnel. By locating community centers such as a USO facility or a Vet Center, disabled veterans can avoid the isolation that can cause depression or other mental health problems.<br />Veterans Crisis Line. (n.d.) Confidential chat room. Retrieved from http://www.veteranscrisisline.net/<br />Offers a telephone hotline or chat room for veterans or family members of veterans to call regarding resources and immediate help. Offers a self-quiz and training materials to assist veterans and family members with understanding the warning signs for suicide.<br />Provides a suicide hotline, an outreach center, and training materials for identifying the warning signs for suicide among veterans. Extensive multi-media material is available for viewing.<br />“Locations.” (n.d.) in United States Department of Veteran Affairs. Retrieved from http://www2.va.gov/directory/guide/home.asp?isFlash=1<br />Veterans and caregivers can use this website to quickly locate the nearest hospitals and facilities where veterans seek assistance or socialize.<br />
    17. 17. And More<br />In addition to the works above, I recommend a recent article published in Library Journal where the “wounded warrior” issue is explained and recent publications are recommended. This article can be found through the following:<br />Hughes, M.A. (2011, July 10). “Collection development | Back on the home front.” Library Journal. Retrieved online from URL: <br />http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home/890883-264/collection_development__back_on.html.csp<br />The list above is a starting point. Feel free to contact me at kjsmulvihill@gmail.com with your recommendations. You can also connect with the librarian at the Patient Education Center at the UCSD Medical Center in La Jolla, (858) 552-7401.<br />

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