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Inquiry Project 3

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Inquiry Project 3

  1. 1. Polar Bears Kalena Gries Educ 373 Nov. 16, 2009
  2. 2. My Experience <ul><li>Growing up, my favorite zoo animal was the polar bear. I have been to Alaska three times, and while I did not see a polar bear while I was there, there were pictures of them everywhere. I have always been fascinated by polar bears, and they remain one of my favorite animals to this day. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Questions That Arose From the Experience <ul><li>Where all can polar bears be found? </li></ul><ul><li>How big can polar bears get, and how long can they live? </li></ul><ul><li>What do polar bears eat? </li></ul><ul><li>How much do they eat, and how long can they go without eating? </li></ul><ul><li>How do polar bears survive in the cold? </li></ul>
  4. 4. Connection to the Standards <ul><li>4.4.4 – Observe and describe that some source of energy is needed for all organisms to stay alive and grow. </li></ul><ul><li>6.4.3 – Describe some of the great variety of body plans and internal structures animals and plants have that contribute to their being able to make or find food and reproduce. </li></ul><ul><li>6.4.8 – Explain that in all environment, such as freshwater, marine, forest, desert, grassland, mountain, and others, organisms with similar needs may compete with one another for resources, including food, space, water, air, and shelter. Note that in any environment, the growth and survival of organisms depend on the physical conditions. </li></ul><ul><li>6.4.9 – Recognize and explain that two types of organisms may interact in a competitive or cooperative relationship, such as producer/consumer, predator/prey, or parasite/host. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Location, Location, Location! <ul><li>Polar bears live in the Arctic at the top of the world. </li></ul><ul><li>“ They are animals which know no boundaries. They pad across the ice from Russia to Alaska, from Canada to Greenland and onto Norway's Svalbard archipelago.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Polar bears do not live in the southern hemisphere.” </li></ul><ul><li>Bear Facts . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from Polar Bears </li></ul><ul><li>International: http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/bear-facts/ . </li></ul><ul><li>Polar Bear FAQ . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from Polar Bears </li></ul><ul><li>International: http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/faq/ . </li></ul>
  6. 6. Size Matters <ul><li>“ Polar bears are the biggest and strongest animals in the snowy Arctic. On four legs, a polar bear is about four feet high. On two legs, a male polar bear might be eleven feet tall. He weighs about 1,500 pounds” (pg. 5). Females are slightly smaller. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Polar bears are so big and strong that they don’t need to live together for protection or for help in getting food” (pg. 5). </li></ul><ul><li>Wild polar bears live an average of 15 to 18 years. Polar bears in captivity can live into their 30s. </li></ul><ul><li>Helmer, D.S. (1997). Polar Bears . New York, NY: Rosen Publishing Group, Inc. </li></ul>
  7. 7. It’s Lunch Time! <ul><li>The polar bear’s primary food source is the seal. They also kill and eat walruses, beluga whales, fish, rabbits, birds, and bird eggs. </li></ul><ul><li>“ When hunting is good, polar bears will typically eat only the fat and leave the rest of the carcass for scavengers including arctic foxes, ravens, and younger bears.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ A polar bear's stomach can hold an estimated 15% to 20% of its body weight [150 lb.]. A polar bear generally eats this much only when its energy demands are high. Polar bears need an average of 2 kg (4.4 lb.) of fat per day to obtain enough energy to survive.” </li></ul><ul><li>They can go for weeks at a time without eating. </li></ul><ul><li>Polar bears do not eat when they hibernate. </li></ul><ul><li>Polar Bear FAQ . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from Polar Bears International: http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/faq/ . </li></ul><ul><li>Polar Bears InfoBook Index . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from SeaWorld: Animals: http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/info-books/polar-bear/index.htm . </li></ul>
  8. 8. Survival 101: That’s One Tough Bear! <ul><li>“ Two layers of fur provide the bears with such good insulation that they experience almost no heat loss. In addition, they are protected with a layer of blubber that can measure 11.5 cm (4.5 inches) thick. Compact ears and a small tail also prevent heat loss.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Polar bears are so well protected from the cold that they have more problems with overheating than they do from the cold. Even in very cold weather, they quickly overheat when they try to run.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Polar bear fur is oily and water repellent. The hairs don't mat when wet, allowing the polar bears to easily shake free of water and any ice that may form after swimming.”  </li></ul><ul><li>Polar Bear FAQ . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from Polar Bears International: http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/faq/ . </li></ul><ul><li>The Polar Bear . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from KidZone: Animal Facts: The Polar Bear: http://www.kidzone.ws/sg/polarbear/polar_bear.htm </li></ul>
  9. 9. Did you know…? <ul><li>“ Despite what our eyes tell us, a polar bear's fur is not white. Each hair shaft is pigment-free and transparent with a hollow core. Polar bears look white because the hollow core scatters and reflects visible light, much like ice and snow does. When photographed with film sensitive to ultraviolet light, polar bears appear black.” </li></ul><ul><li>Only pregnant polar bears hibernate. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually two cubs make up a litter; polar bear cubs stay with their mother for about two years. </li></ul><ul><li>Bear Facts . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from Polar Bears International: http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/bear-facts/ . </li></ul>
  10. 10. References <ul><li>Helmer, D.S. (1997). Polar Bears . New York, NY: Rosen Publishing Group, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>Lesser, C. (1996). Great Crystal Bear . San Diego, CA: Harcourt Brace & Company. </li></ul><ul><li>Thompson, L. (2004). Polar Bear Night . New York, NY: Scholastic Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Bear Facts . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from Polar Bears International: http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/bear-facts/ . </li></ul><ul><li>Polar Bear FAQ . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from Polar Bears International: http://www.polarbearsinternational.org/faq/ . </li></ul><ul><li>Polar Bears InfoBook Index . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from SeaWorld: Animals: http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/info-books/polar-bear/index.htm . </li></ul><ul><li>The Polar Bear . (2009). Retrieved November 10, 2009, from KidZone: Animal Facts: The Polar Bear: http://www.kidzone.ws/sg/polarbear/polar_bear.htm </li></ul>
  11. 11. More Resources <ul><li>Photos </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://maxysoft.com/screens/animals/polar-bear-big.jpg </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.ifaw.org/images_custom/save_animals/Bears/Polar_Bear/Polar_Bear_Global_Map.jpg </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.scientificamerican.com/media/inline/blog/Image/Polar_Bear_2004-11-15.jpg </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://gabbyinbrownstudy.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/sleeping_beauty_polar_bear-1600x1200.jpg </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.alaska-in-pictures.com/data/media/2/underwater-swimming-polar-bear_2968.jpg </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.cs2.org.vt.edu/beeks/spring08/mackenzie/cute_polar_bear.jpg </li></ul></ul>

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