Chapter11 allen7e

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EDU 221 Children With Exceptionalities

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Chapter11 allen7e

  1. 1. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Chapter 11 Characteristics of Effective Teachers in Inclusive Programs
  2. 2. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Teacher Professional Development • Teacher training in child development is a must. • Teachers also need to be a member of the interdisciplinary team. • They will share their knowledge and implement plans set forth by other professionals to meet goals in the IFSP/IEP.
  3. 3. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Teacher Professional Development (continued) • Teacher concerns – Teachers feel unprepared to work with children who have disabilities. – Supports are available to help teachers. – Teachers need to want to seek out information to help them help the child with disabilities. – The more informed the teacher is, the better prepared that teacher will be for the classroom.
  4. 4. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. Teacher Professional Development (continued) • Supplemental professional development – Teachers need additional training as each child is enrolled in the school. – On-the-job experience is also necessary. – State support agencies have resources available to help teachers learn about the different disabilities.
  5. 5. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. The Applied Developmental Approach • A child is a child – Teachers need to view each child as a child. – Blaming a behavior on a disability is unfounded. – Children are children first and need to be treated as such.
  6. 6. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. The Applied Developmental Approach (continued) • Review of developmental principles – Developmental sequences • Understanding that a child moves through skill sequences is more important than knowing how far a child is behind or ahead. – Interrelationships among developmental domains • Recognize that the whole child needs to be taught, not just the cognitive domain of the child.
  7. 7. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. The Applied Developmental Approach (continued) – Developmental inconsistencies • This is when a child seems to be progressing then begins to slow or regress. – The transactional process • Learning goes on directly and indirectly. • Teachers need to examine the environment to see the full effect of their teaching.
  8. 8. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. The Applied Developmental Approach (continued) – Contingent stimulation • The more a child is rewarded for communicating, the more the child will communicate. • Self-esteem develops, attachments are more secure, development is smoother. – Readiness to learn • Given the opportunity to learn in a quality environment will give the child skills needed to be ready for school.
  9. 9. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. The Applied Developmental Approach (continued) – Teachable moments • Those naturally occurring opportunities when a child is most likely to learn something new. – Milieu teaching • The child initiates a learning activity by asking a teacher for help, materials, or information.
  10. 10. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. The Applied Developmental Approach (continued) • Characteristics of effective teachers – Enthusiasm – Sense of humor – Patience – Consistency – Flexibility – Trustworthiness – Provides limits – Facilitate experiences
  11. 11. ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. The Applied Developmental Approach (continued) • Teacher as mediator – The teacher is the mediator between the child and the environment. – The teacher decreases support as the child is ready for more independent learning. • Also known as scaffolding

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