Spring 2012 PAAVE/CARE Training
 What is S/A? Research and Stats Myths & Facts Confidentiality Victim Centered approach to interviews &  reporting S...
   In 2006, there were 272,350 incidents of rape    and sexual assault (NCVS) in USA     Women 14+ w/ cardinal knowledge...
 2008 – 1307 rapes reported to lawenforcement LVMPD received more than 3200 reports of SA  during the first quarter of 2...
   Victim and suspect don’t know each other   Weapon was used   Signs of injury r atruggle are present   Victim is hys...
   Who commits the crime of sexual assault?   How does force happen?   What kind of injuries occur?   How does a victi...
 Very few victims report immediately Many victims have a number of factors that  limit their perceived credibility which...
   NRS 200.366 defines sexual assault   Other crimes include SSS   These crimes often do not occur alone; DV,    Strang...
 “A person who subjects another person to sexual penetration, or who forces another person to make a sexual penetration o...
   Between 28-42% of secual assaults are    reported   Only 32% of those reported restult in an    arrest   100 S/A = 2...
   What is Real Rape?   How do we judge victims?   How can that judgment affect how we serve    survivors?     Media p...
   Perpetrators – how do we know a person is a    sex offender?     Society often provides excuses     Engage victim an...
   Non- Stranger Suspect   False Reports     Kanin/Lisak study
   Confidentiality is provided to victims under    NRS.178.5691   Specifically recognizes the need for privacy    on SA ...
   Victim Cooperation is necessary   Victims should be the center of the    investigation   Decisions are based on impa...
   Requires on to confront one’s own preception    regarding sexual violence issues   Establishes and reinforces a stand...
   Performed at UMC   VAWA 2005 mandates that victims may not    be charged for the exam and that it does not    require...
   Triage   Medical Forensic History   Photography   Exam and Evidence Collection   STI evaluation and acare   Pregn...
   What are the common drugs associated with    DFSA?   Only 39% of reported cases are DFSA   Most of these cases the v...
Go to a safe placeSeek medical attention immediately. University Medical Center (UMC)is the only hospital that will do a...
   Affected by victims background   Some behavior may appear counterintuitive   (not fighting back, mot reporting, cont...
   Can be short or long term       Cutting/self-mutilation       Eating disorders       Depression       Alcohol and ...
   Cultural Norms and Social Interactions guide    human behavior   Victims must come to their own    understanding abou...
   Expressed – openly displays emotion, may be    agitated, restless, talk, cry, shout, swear, or    laugh   Controlled ...
Victim centered services in interpersonal violence advocacy
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Victim centered services in interpersonal violence advocacy

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Victim centered services in interpersonal violence advocacy

  1. 1. Spring 2012 PAAVE/CARE Training
  2. 2.  What is S/A? Research and Stats Myths & Facts Confidentiality Victim Centered approach to interviews & reporting SANE Exam Effects on Victims Resources for reporting & healing
  3. 3.  In 2006, there were 272,350 incidents of rape and sexual assault (NCVS) in USA  Women 14+ w/ cardinal knowledge 14% of undergraduate women report sexual assault during college (Campus S/A Study) 2 out of 10 rapes on college campuses are committed by strangers
  4. 4.  2008 – 1307 rapes reported to lawenforcement LVMPD received more than 3200 reports of SA during the first quarter of 2009, this includes all sex crimes and kidnapping State as a whole has a 32% clearance rate  1319 incidents: 58% - insufficient ev., victim recanted, uncooperative, no contact, or unable to ID 9% unfounded 2% zeroed or other 7% open or submitted 1% handled by other jurisdiction 8% closed by exception, leads exhausted, suspended 1% denied by DA or dismissed 14% closed by arrest, summons or warrant issued
  5. 5.  Victim and suspect don’t know each other Weapon was used Signs of injury r atruggle are present Victim is hysterical Victim has never reported before Suspect is not likeable Victim actively participate in investigation Victim never changes their account of what happened Victim is certain about the details of the assault
  6. 6.  Who commits the crime of sexual assault? How does force happen? What kind of injuries occur? How does a victim react? Who are victims?
  7. 7.  Very few victims report immediately Many victims have a number of factors that limit their perceived credibility which is perceived to be atypical of ‘real victims’Who are victims?- Vulnerable populations- 16-24 year olds most likely to report, male and females…
  8. 8.  NRS 200.366 defines sexual assault Other crimes include SSS These crimes often do not occur alone; DV, Strangulation, kidnapping, robbery New Legislation – Strangulation and SA Protection Orders
  9. 9.  “A person who subjects another person to sexual penetration, or who forces another person to make a sexual penetration on himself or another, against the victim’s will or under conditions in which the perpetrator knows or should know that the victim is mentally or physically incapable of resisting or understanding the nature of his conduct, is guilty of sexual assault”
  10. 10.  Between 28-42% of secual assaults are reported Only 32% of those reported restult in an arrest 100 S/A = 28 reports = 9 arrests 91% of all sesual assaults result in no action taken against the suspect
  11. 11.  What is Real Rape? How do we judge victims? How can that judgment affect how we serve survivors?  Media portrayal of rape accusations show us just how easy it is to believe the suspect’s accounts and discount the victim’s statements
  12. 12.  Perpetrators – how do we know a person is a sex offender?  Society often provides excuses  Engage victim and gains trust  Knows what they are doing is wrong but justify their actions Ctr for Sex Offender Mgmnt look at reasons for perpetration – opportunistic, pervasicely angry, sexual gratification, vindictive Anger –power - sadistic
  13. 13.  Non- Stranger Suspect False Reports  Kanin/Lisak study
  14. 14.  Confidentiality is provided to victims under NRS.178.5691 Specifically recognizes the need for privacy on SA cases in 200.377, they further recognize the state has compelling interest in ensuring that sexual assaults are reported
  15. 15.  Victim Cooperation is necessary Victims should be the center of the investigation Decisions are based on impact on victim and with the victim’s knowledge Work as a team
  16. 16.  Requires on to confront one’s own preception regarding sexual violence issues Establishes and reinforces a standard of care and treatment of survivors Affects the perception of the services’ effectiveness to ensure response Improves quantity and quality of reporting How responders react affects victims receptivity to medical treatment and to provide information/coperation
  17. 17.  Performed at UMC VAWA 2005 mandates that victims may not be charged for the exam and that it does not require a police report Exams can be conducted up to seven days after, and for best result, within 72 hours
  18. 18.  Triage Medical Forensic History Photography Exam and Evidence Collection STI evaluation and acare Pregnancy Risk Evaluation and Care
  19. 19.  What are the common drugs associated with DFSA? Only 39% of reported cases are DFSA Most of these cases the victim willinigly took the drugs or alcohol Focus should be on the prepetrators’ behavior
  20. 20. Go to a safe placeSeek medical attention immediately. University Medical Center (UMC)is the only hospital that will do a rape kit. You may be injured moreseriously than you realize. Medical evidence will be needed if youdecide to press charges.Call University Police (895-3668) or CALL 911. Reporting is not thesame as pressing charges.Call the Counseling and Psychological Services (895-3627).Do not blame yourself-you are the victim of a crime.Do NOT bathe, shower, douche, or change clothes until you havetalked with the police or nurse. However, if you have already done thesethings, please do not let his stop you from seeking medical care. If you’vechanged clothes , place the clothes you were wearing in a paper bag andthem to the hospital with you.Remember you may have an advocate to help every step of the way
  21. 21.  Affected by victims background Some behavior may appear counterintuitive (not fighting back, mot reporting, continuing to see the assailant) Most victims report heightened fear, avoidance, re-experiencing the crime, and bypervigilance. Physical and Emotional reactions
  22. 22.  Can be short or long term  Cutting/self-mutilation  Eating disorders  Depression  Alcohol and substance abuse  Re-entrance in to violent relationships  PTSD  Academic Career ▪ Shorter Class Load, Not graduating on time, missed assignments, avoiding perpetrator at school
  23. 23.  Cultural Norms and Social Interactions guide human behavior Victims must come to their own understanding about how or why the rape happened so they can integrate this into their psychology Micro – within the victim, impacted by Macro systems
  24. 24.  Expressed – openly displays emotion, may be agitated, restless, talk, cry, shout, swear, or laugh Controlled – emotions are contained, most of the survivor’s energy is directed toward maintaining composure. They may sit calmly, be detached, logical, downplay their fear, sadness, anger or anxiety

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