Slides - Leveraging institutional open practices to promote access- AVU Conference Workshop 2013

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These slides are from a workshop called Leveraging Institutional Open Practices to Promote Access to Education at the African Virtual University 1st International Conference on November 20, 2013 (http://www.avu.org/1st-International-Conference-of-the-AVU-2013/pre-conference-workshops-november-20th-2013.html). The workshop was facilitated by Kathleen Ludewig Omollo and James Glapa-Grossklag. This and other materials from the workshop are available at http://tinyurl.com/levopenws-avu13. Editable versions are available at http://open.umich.edu/node/7497/. Workshop materials are copyright 2013 The Regents of the University of Michigan and College of the Canyons, shared under a CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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Slides - Leveraging institutional open practices to promote access- AVU Conference Workshop 2013

  1. 1. 1   AVU  International  Conference,  Nairobi,  Kenya,  Nov.  20,  2013   Download  slides:  http://tinyurl.com/levopenws-­‐avu13     James  Glapa-­‐Grossklag,  College  of  the  Canyons   Kathleen  Ludewig  Omollo,  University  of  Michigan   Except  where  otherwise  noted,  this  work  is  available  under  a  Creative  Commons   Attribution  3.0  License.  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.       Copyright  2013  College  of  the  Canyons  and  the  Regents  of  the  University  of  Michigan.    
  2. 2. 2     Locate  open  practices  within  one’s   institutional  mission     Provide  a  framework  for  identifying   opportunities  for  and  comparing  institutional   open  practices  within  one’s  own  institutional   context     Identify  and  address  incentives,  policies,  and   practices  for  adopting  open  licenses    
  3. 3. 3     Participants  will  identify  opportunities  for   and  compare  institutional  practices  with  their   own  institutional  contexts.     Participants  will  leave  the  workshop  with   tactics  for  advocacy  and  integration  of  open   education  in  varying  institutional  and  cultural   contexts.  
  4. 4. 4   General  introductions   Presentation:  Open  education  from  three  case   studies     Large  Group  Discussion:  institutional  mission   and  meaning  of  access     Small  Group  Discussion:  institutional  policies   and  practices       Small  Group  Activity:  messages  for  different   stakeholders       Small  Group  Activity:  action  plan     Closing  and  feedback      
  5. 5. 5  
  6. 6. 6   1.  2.  3.  Open  enrollment   Non-­‐traditional  students   Low  cost  
  7. 7. 7   1.  Faculty  choice   2.  Department  review   3.  Data  collection  
  8. 8. 8   1.  Creative  Commons  license   2.  Institutional  repository   3.  Open  textbook    
  9. 9. 9   1.  Executive  support   2.  Bookstore  collaboration   3.  Technical  compatibility  
  10. 10. 10   The  mission  of  the  University  of  Michigan   [UMich]  is  to  serve  the  people  of  Michigan   and  the  world  through  preeminence  in   creating,  communicating,  preserving  and   applying  knowledge,  art,  and  academic   values,  and  in  developing  leaders  and  citizens   who  will  challenge  the  present  and  enrich  the   future.   Source:  http://president.umich.edu/mission.php      
  11. 11. 11     “creating,  communicating,  preserving  and  applying   knowledge”  for  teaching,  learning,  and  research:     By  unbundling  educational  content  so  that  it  is  portable:   ▪  ▪  ▪  ▪  ▪  across  structures  (e.g.  courses,  tutorials),     across  mediums  (e.g.  print-­‐on-­‐demand  or  digital  texts),     across  devices  (e.g.  desktop  vs  mobile),   across  types  of  computer  networks  (online,  offline,  hybrid)   across  audiences  and  markets     through  transparent,  reproducible,  and  adaptable   processes  that  can  be  adapted  by  others  across                                         and  beyond  the  institution  
  12. 12. 12   1.  Umbrella  initiative  to  bridge  various  open-­‐ related  initiatives  across  campus   2.  Sharing  content,  tools,  and  processes  –   with  open  licenses  and  common  formats   3.  Hybrid  models  of  content  that  is  free  with   optional  additional  services  at  a  fee  
  13. 13. 13   1.  Support  from  leadership  within  the   medical  school   2.  Transitions  of  services  to  other  units  on   campus  (mixed  success)   3.  Embedding  into  existing  eLearning   production  (e.g.  Coursera)   4.  Tracking  of  metrics  across  hosting   platforms  
  14. 14. 14     Advance  health  education  in  Africa  by:     Creating  and  promoting  free,  openly  licensed   teaching  materials  created  by  Africans  to  share   knowledge;     Identifying  and  addressing  curriculum  gaps;  and     Bridging  health  education  communities    
  15. 15. 15     Ability  to  adapt  to  local  contexts  (e.g.  culture,   language)     Low-­‐cost  materials     Ability  to  circulate  offline  
  16. 16. 16     Crowdsourcing  translation  of  videos     Using  and  adapting  of  learning  resources   between  and  within  regions     Distribution  of  learning  materials  through   local  (wireless)  area  networks  
  17. 17. 17     Regional  network  as  a  method  of  scaling     Offline  usage  can  be  difficult  to  track     Differing  practices  and  policies  around   informed  consent  (for  recording)  
  18. 18. 18     What  is  your  institutional  mission?     What  are  different  types  of  access?     Which  type(s)  of  access  are    most  relevant  to   your  institution?   (companion  worksheet  Session  3:  http://tinyurl.com/levopenws-­‐3-­‐4)  
  19. 19. 19   What  are  definitions,  examples,  type  of  access,   and  relation  to  your  institutional  mission  for   the  following  concepts:     Distance  education     Intellectual  property  rights     eLearning     Open  practices   (companion  worksheet  Session  4:  http://tinyurl.com/levopenws-­‐3-­‐4)  
  20. 20. 20             Who  are  the  key  stakeholders  for:  distance  learning,   intellectual  property  rights,  e-­‐learning,  open  practices?   In  what  type(s)  of  access  is  that  stakeholder  most   interested?   What  message  would  motivate  that  stakeholder  to   adopt  open  practices?   What  is  an  appropriate  distribution  medium  to  reach   this  stakeholder  (e.g.  report,  committee,  video,  journal   article,  social  media)?   What  evidence  will  be  necessary  to  demonstrate   increased  access  within  relation  to  mission?   (companion  worksheet  Session  5:  http://tinyurl.com/levopenws-­‐5)  
  21. 21. 21     How  will  you  apply  the  ideas  from  this   workshop  at  your  home  institution  over  the   next  12  months?   (companion  worksheet  Session  6:  http://tinyurl.com/levopenws-­‐6)  
  22. 22. 22   Image  CC  BY  SA   Opensourceway  (flickr)  
  23. 23. 23   Workshop  Materials:  http://tinyurl.com/levopenws-­‐avu13   James  Glapa-­‐Grossklag:     james.glapa-­‐grossklag@canyons.edu   Dean,  College  of  Canyons   President,  Advisory  Board,  Community  College  Consortium  for  OER   Member,  Board  of  Directors,  OpenCourseWare  Consortium   http://oer.canyons.edu/   http://oerconsortium.org/     Kathleen  Ludewig  Omollo:     kludewig@umich.edu   International  Program  Manager,  Office  of  Enabling  Technologies,  University  of  Michigan   http://open.umich.edu   http://www.oerafrica.org/healthoer    

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