Social Networking to Support Climate Change Education

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This are the slides that Kimberly Lightle presented at the Tri-Agency (NSF-NASA-NOAA) Climate Change Education Meeting on March 1, 2011.

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Social Networking to Support Climate Change Education

  1. 1. THE ROLE OF SOCIAL NETWORKING IN CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION KIMBERLY LIGHTLE
  2. 2. <ul><li>The People Formerly Known as the Audience </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… can now create, connect, and even mobilize </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Key Themes <ul><li>Climate Change Literacy: Translating Knowledge into Action (citizen science) </li></ul><ul><li>Serving the Climate Change Education Needs of Different Audiences (long tail) </li></ul><ul><li>Cost-effective Strategies for Scaling Up Programs (many of these tools are free) </li></ul><ul><li>Leveraging Partnerships (tap into communities that already exist) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Build an “architecture of participation” that allows users to create, collaborate, connect <ul><ul><li>Look for an established community that has collaborative spaces, e.g. Encyclopedia of Earth (CAMEL), CLN/CLEAN, MSP2, other NINGs, Learn Central, state networks (Ohio – Project Discovery), regional CCE-P networks, Facebook </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pick what your audience wants to do (and what you want them to do) – and then find the tool(s) that allows for that to happen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrate those tools (including RSS) to allow these behaviors to happen </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. From: http://www.fredcavazza.net/2008/06/09/social-media-landscape/
  6. 7. http://beyondweather.ehe.osu.edu
  7. 8. http://beyondpenguins.nsdl.org
  8. 9. http://msteacher2.org
  9. 10. MSP2: Year 2 Evaluation Focus <ul><li>Identify a profile of participation for its users: quantitative and qualitative analyses of user participation in MSP2, Teacher Leader interviews, and member surveys  </li></ul><ul><li>Developed a Participation Rank Rubric and Social Network Conversation Rubric </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation Reports and participation rubrics can be found here - http://issuu.com/dlatosu/docs </li></ul>
  10. 11. Expectations Management <ul><li>Small group of core “posters” – but lots of looky-loos (we can tell by metrics) </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t make the “Milkshake Mistake” </li></ul><ul><li>Membership has more years of teaching experience than we thought they would </li></ul><ul><li>Vast majority of members found out about MSP2 through Friend or colleague or Web search </li></ul><ul><li>Extrinsic motivation usually doesn’t work – value social motivation (wanting to be part of group) </li></ul>
  11. 12. Still a Big Experiment <ul><li>Constant trial and error (i.e., what tools, rewards have the most impact) </li></ul><ul><li>Behavior does follow opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>Big % of audience is not comfortable with this “participatory culture” </li></ul><ul><li>Mt. Rushmore vs. Bazaar – give folks reason to come back – new content </li></ul><ul><li>Welcome everyone </li></ul>
  12. 13. Contact Kimberly Lightle at [email_address] http://people.ehe.ohio-state.edu/klightle/

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