Learning From Luther: The 2nd Mobile Revolution

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  • \n
  • Let’s get the religious iconography out of the way. Oh, wrong Madonna.\n
  • My equivalent to a “6 degrees from Kevin Bacon story” is a “2 degrees from Madonna” story: My boss at my first web job Randal Ciccone, one of Madonna’s first cousins.\n
  • Our employer, Woolpert, was an early adopter of pushing their project communications to the web. \n
  • We were so proud of it, we even featured photos of our web sites on our print publications. (so 90s!)\n
  • My entry into mobile was very device-focused — I simply fell in love with the iPhone, and the App Store as a way to reach iPhone and iPod touch users all over the world. So I took a typical first approach and designed an app that interested me, an alphabet flashcard app that encompassed several things that I love: typography, photography, art history, and my children.\n
  • Then I moved on to collaborating with other people, and their ideas and content.\n
  • After taking tons of notes about the NimbleKit JavaScript library for turning web standards developed content into native Objective C iOS apps, I turned that experience into a book.\n
  • Then I started getting into mobile web. But largely, I would characterize my time at the University of Minnesota as not being as much on the leading edge of web as my time at Woolpert. But that also what makes it great experience: we inevitably work with people or orgs who are not willing or able to jump ahead quickly. For them, interim solutions can be more necessary,such as incrementally mobilizing the web.\n
  • And this took me to a new job this spring where I am “all mobile, all the time” (Mobile Product Manager for Capella Education Company).\n
  • So now I’m taking my past year of mobile design and research experience and turning that into a book, too. And this addresses those who know that mobile is getting big, but aren’t able to embrace mobile before desktop. This book applies mobile first and responsive design to legacy web sites with fixed grid layouts, encouraging baby steps and gaining mobile experience with what you have before completely redesigning a web experience for mobile first.\n
  • People have been trying to get their stories and content out to wider audiences for a long, long time. Our first efforts were not very mobile.\n
  • But starting about 4 thousand years ago, we started to figure out mobile.\n
  • And like many good human ideas, they were taken quite a but further and improved upon by the Chinese.\n
  • Then the first pre-modern books started to appear in Europe after that. They were all hand-lettered and illustrated. Illuminated manuscripts: they appeared to glow. \n
  • But they were very costly in both money and lives. To make enough vellum for a large volume required the skins of as many as 300 sheep.\n
  • That’s a lot of sheep.\n
  • This approach was tried one last, heroic time by modern-day monks in Minnesota and the UK in a unique collaboration. It’s taken place over the past decade and is just being finished now: the St. John’s Bible.\n
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  • Again, not a good cost-to-reach ratio, however.\n
  • Again, not a good cost-to-reach ratio, however.\n
  • Again, not a good cost-to-reach ratio, however.\n
  • As it turns out, the world’s most popular tablet has been around for 500 years. The modern book was perfected by Johannes Gutenberg with his invention of movable type. By combining a wine press with a faster way to cast reusable metal type, he perfected a way to more rapidly reproduce words.\n
  • But this invention couldn’t make any money on its own, it needed content. This is a crucial lesson that we’ll see repeated 500 years later in our current mobile revolution.\n
  • Ironically, some of the initial content was developed not by our story’s protagonist but by his antagonist, Johann Tetzel. Tetzel’s indulgences, printed certificates that could be purchased to absolve your deceased family members of their sins, were one of the things that led Martin Luther to lead the Protestant revolution in Europe against some of the teachings of the Roman Catholic church.\n
  • Initially, Luther’s response was not very mobile. He tacked his hand-written 95 theses to the door of the caste church in Wittenberg, Germany. But soon after, his short-form writings as well as his landmark translation of the Bible into vernacular German changed all of Europe.\n
  • Initially, Luther’s response was not very mobile. He tacked his hand-written 95 theses to the door of the caste church in Wittenberg, Germany. But soon after, his short-form writings as well as his landmark translation of the Bible into vernacular German changed all of Europe.\n
  • Initially, Luther’s response was not very mobile. He tacked his hand-written 95 theses to the door of the caste church in Wittenberg, Germany. But soon after, his short-form writings as well as his landmark translation of the Bible into vernacular German changed all of Europe.\n
  • Luther’s translation of the Bible let to many things. Printing presses were set up all across Europe. His translations, and then those of others, formalized German, English, and French, making them the dominant modern languages. It’s said that Scottish Gaelic declined in use compared to Welsh Celtic because there was a Welsh translation of the Bible.\n
  • Luther’s translation of the Bible let to many things. Printing presses were set up all across Europe. His translations, and then those of others, formalized German, English, and French, making them the dominant modern languages. It’s said that Scottish Gaelic declined in use compared to Welsh Celtic because there was a Welsh translation of the Bible.\n
  • Luther’s translation of the Bible let to many things. Printing presses were set up all across Europe. His translations, and then those of others, formalized German, English, and French, making them the dominant modern languages. It’s said that Scottish Gaelic declined in use compared to Welsh Celtic because there was a Welsh translation of the Bible.\n
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  • Luther’s use of Flügschriften was an embrace of modern-day blogging or social media, where a shorter-form, more frequent medium is used to complement your primary communications or business channel.\n
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  • Luther talking about his translation of the Bible into everyday vernacular German. A true user experience designer!\n
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  • Luther’s goals with his translation were comparable to Steve Krug’s goals for web usability: the Bible shouldn’t be hard to access or understand. If it is, it’s not doing its job. Power to the people!\n
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  • So the lessons learned here are, stop thinking about mobile as an end. We shouldn’t fixate on devices and platforms only.\n
  • So the lessons learned here are, stop thinking about mobile as an end. We shouldn’t fixate on devices and platforms only.\n
  • The best way to implement mobile is to use it to infuse everything else that you’re probably already doing: delivering web content, acting on a social strategy, and constantly iterating and making sure what you design and deliver works.\n
  • The best way to implement mobile is to use it to infuse everything else that you’re probably already doing: delivering web content, acting on a social strategy, and constantly iterating and making sure what you design and deliver works.\n
  • The best way to implement mobile is to use it to infuse everything else that you’re probably already doing: delivering web content, acting on a social strategy, and constantly iterating and making sure what you design and deliver works.\n
  • Let’s see how mobile changed Apple.\n
  • At first, Apple Computer focused on computer devices. Though Steve Wozniak, in particular, infused Apple with an important value: the early Apple II had slots where you could hack the computer to add your own devices, and the BASIC programming language for writing your own programs. At the beginning, Apple was tailoring computing to human needs and desires for building upon and changing a platform.\n
  • With Mac, Apple revolutionized computing but also locked the user out of more direct modifications in favor of greater control over hardware and software interaction. This has been their model since. This is also Apple’s first mobile device -- it had a handle!\n
  • Another early Apple attempt at mobile...\n
  • Apple gets into the content business.\n
  • And designs a device that is primarily about obtaining and accessing other people’s creations. In this case, music (though not created on the device; it’s only one-way).\n
  • Note that with the iPhone, the name of the company also changes. Apple is formally in a a business that is less focused on computers, and more on overall user experience and content distribution.\n
  • The iPhone at another form factor, the tablet.\n
  • Note how the apps in the App Store are typically not about completely new technologies. Photography, film, talking and gossiping, weather, retail, music: we’re merely revisiting and retooling these existing technologies in a mobile context.\n
  • Zillow\n
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  • Maps showing transit info.\n
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  • iMapMyRun integrates with Map My Run on desktop.\n
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  • The growth of mobile continues to go unabated. Now in parts of Asia and Africa, the majority of web traffic is on mobile devices. Mobile is the web.\n
  • The growth of mobile continues to go unabated. Now in parts of Asia and Africa, the majority of web traffic is on mobile devices. Mobile is the web.\n
  • The growth of mobile continues to go unabated. Now in parts of Asia and Africa, the majority of web traffic is on mobile devices. Mobile is the web.\n
  • And the growth is across all sectors: those who sell content, and those who sell services. Or simply those who enable selling.\n
  • And the growth is across all sectors: those who sell content, and those who sell services. Or simply those who enable selling.\n
  • And the growth is across all sectors: those who sell content, and those who sell services. Or simply those who enable selling.\n
  • And the growth is across all areas of people’s lives. Our life content -- what we need to find, what we listen to, what we’re sending and receiving from others.\n
  • And the growth is across all areas of people’s lives. Our life content -- what we need to find, what we listen to, what we’re sending and receiving from others.\n
  • And the growth is across all areas of people’s lives. Our life content -- what we need to find, what we listen to, what we’re sending and receiving from others.\n
  • And of course, where we are going.\n
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  • The next big thing: the Kindle Fire\n
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  • Do these things sound familiar?\n
  • Do these things sound familiar?\n
  • Do these things sound familiar?\n
  • They’re certainly part of Apple’s success. In my opinion, the company most like Apple (and their most direct competitor) is not Android or Microsoft. It’s Amazon.\n
  • So there is a missing piece, for those of us who don’t want to push our mobile content through Apple’s App Store or Amazon.com. What about a way to distribute web content that has value, without giving it away?\n
  • So there is a missing piece, for those of us who don’t want to push our mobile content through Apple’s App Store or Amazon.com. What about a way to distribute web content that has value, without giving it away?\n
  • So there is a missing piece, for those of us who don’t want to push our mobile content through Apple’s App Store or Amazon.com. What about a way to distribute web content that has value, without giving it away?\n
  • On the business end, having people pay for web content is a fairly significant construction project. That’s why app stores are so popular: they make selling content a lot easier.\n
  • And on the customer end, a pay wall looks like a big commitment. But we don’t want to make a big commitment online. We want small commitments, with low barriers to entry, and no risk or friction.\n
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  • Learning From Luther: The 2nd Mobile Revolution

    1. 1. LearningfromLuther:The SecondMobileRevolutionKristofer LayonMIMA SummitOctober 12, 2011
    2. 2. Madonna and Child http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9d/Don_Lorenzo_Monaco_013.jpg
    3. 3. Madonna Ciccone http://en.gtwallpaper.com/fondecran/madonna/madonna_10.jpg
    4. 4. ArtAlphabetAesthete Software, LLC2009
    5. 5. OrthoAnatomyAesthete Software, LLC2010
    6. 6. Peachpit / New Riders, 2010
    7. 7. Peachpit / New Riders, 2011
    8. 8. PetroglyphsUtah12,000 B.C. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_book
    9. 9. PapyrusEgypt2000 B.C. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_book
    10. 10. Bamboo bookChina2 B.C. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_book
    11. 11. Illuminated manuscriptEngland1400 A.D. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_book
    12. 12. x 300
    13. 13. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_book
    14. 14. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_book
    15. 15. St. John’s Bible
    16. 16. St. John’s Bible• 1999-2011
    17. 17. St. John’s Bible• 1999-2011• $4 million
    18. 18. St. John’s Bible• 1999-2011• $4 million• 360 copies
    19. 19. Printing PressJohannes Gutenberg1441 d.umn.edu
    20. 20. Religious ReformerMartin Luther1483-1546 www.wikipedia.org
    21. 21. Religious Reformer (and first Mobile App Designer)Martin Luther1483-1546 www.wikipedia.org
    22. 22. “As soon as a coin in the coffer rings, the soul from purgatory springs.”IndulgencesJohann Tetzel1465-1519 www.wikipedia.org
    23. 23. Martin Luther
    24. 24. Martin Luther• made content mobile
    25. 25. Martin Luther• made content mobile• made content social
    26. 26. Martin Luther• made content mobile• made content social• made content valuable
    27. 27. Martin Luther
    28. 28. Martin Luther• vision: technology + content
    29. 29. Martin Luther• vision: technology + content• influence: language + nation
    30. 30. Martin Luther• vision: technology + content• influence: language + nation• results: culture + power
    31. 31. Flügschriften
    32. 32. flying writings
    33. 33. Das Twitter http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_CHG2GRbeET8
    34. 34. Religious ReformerMartin Luther1483-1546
    35. 35. Religious Reformer (and first Social Media Strategist)Martin Luther1483-1546
    36. 36. “One must ask the mother at home, the children in the street, the man at the market, and listen to how they speak.” Collinson, Patrick. The Reformation (2004)
    37. 37. Usability evaluation
    38. 38. Usability evaluation• don’t design in isolation
    39. 39. Usability evaluation• don’t design in isolation• test, iterate, repeat
    40. 40. Usability evaluation• don’t design in isolation• test, iterate, repeat• usability always teaches you something
    41. 41. Religious ReformerMartin Luther1483-1546
    42. 42. Religious Reformer (and first Usability Evaluator)Martin Luther1483-1546
    43. 43. Mobile strategy
    44. 44. Mobile strategyGet away from thinking ofmobile as devices andplatforms.
    45. 45. Mobile strategyGet away from thinking ofmobile as devices andplatforms.
    46. 46. Mobile strategy
    47. 47. Mobile strategy• mobile = content strategy
    48. 48. Mobile strategy• mobile = content strategy• mobile = social strategy
    49. 49. Mobile strategy• mobile = content strategy• mobile = social strategy• mobile = usability strategy
    50. 50. Apple ISteve Wozniak and Steve Jobs1976 www.computerhistory.org
    51. 51. Apple IIApple Computer, Inc.1977 www.wikipedia.org
    52. 52. MacintoshApple Computer, Inc.1984 www.wikipedia.org
    53. 53. NewtonApple Computer, Inc.1993 www.wikipedia.org
    54. 54. iTunesApple Computer, Inc.2001 www.apple.com
    55. 55. iPodApple Computer, Inc.2001 www.wikipedia.org
    56. 56. iPhoneApple, Inc.2007 www.apple.com
    57. 57. iPadApple, Inc.2010 www.apple.com
    58. 58. www.apple.com
    59. 59. Growth of mobileSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011; http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/ (October 11, 2011)
    60. 60. Growth of mobile• 10 billion devicesSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011; http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/ (October 11, 2011)
    61. 61. Growth of mobile• 10 billion devices• Number of people in the world: 6.9 billion (estimated)Source: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011; http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/ (October 11, 2011)
    62. 62. Growth of mobile• 10 billion devices• Number of people in the world: 6.9 billion (estimated)• iPhone 4S: 1 mil. sold on first daySource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011; http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/ (October 11, 2011)
    63. 63. Growth of mobileSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    64. 64. Growth of mobile• Amazon: $1 billion in 1 yearSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    65. 65. Growth of mobile• Amazon: $1 billion in 1 year• eBay: mobile sales up from $600 million to $2 billion last yearSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    66. 66. Growth of mobile• Amazon: $1 billion in 1 year• eBay: mobile sales up from $600 million to $2 billion last year• PayPal: mobile transactions up from $25 to $141 million (6x!)Source: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    67. 67. Growth of mobileSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    68. 68. Growth of mobile• Google: mobile searches grew 130% in Q3 2010Source: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    69. 69. Growth of mobile• Google: mobile searches grew 130% in Q3 2010• Pandora: 50% of users subscribe and use on mobileSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    70. 70. Growth of mobile• Google: mobile searches grew 130% in Q3 2010• Pandora: 50% of users subscribe and use on mobile• Email: 70% of smartphone users access email on mobile deviceSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    71. 71. Growth of mobileSource: Marissa Meyer, SXSW, March 2011
    72. 72. Growth of mobile• Google Maps: more than 100 million miles of driving directions per daySource: Marissa Meyer, SXSW, March 2011
    73. 73. Decline of desktopSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    74. 74. Decline of desktop• Home use of personal computers down 20% since 2008Source: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    75. 75. Decline of desktop• Home use of personal computers down 20% since 2008• Desktop-based Gmail usage down 7%Source: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    76. 76. Decline of desktop• Home use of personal computers down 20% since 2008• Desktop-based Gmail usage down 7%• Facebook: mobile users twice as active as desktop usersSource: Luke Wroblewski, MinneWebCon, April 2011
    77. 77. Kindle FireAmazon.com, Inc.2011
    78. 78. Kindle Fire
    79. 79. Kindle Fire• hardware
    80. 80. Kindle Fire• hardware• software (OS + apps)
    81. 81. Kindle Fire• hardware• software (OS + apps)• content
    82. 82. Why Kindle Fire matters
    83. 83. Why Kindle Fire matters• 1,000,000 books
    84. 84. Why Kindle Fire matters• 1,000,000 books• superb customer service
    85. 85. Why Kindle Fire matters• 1,000,000 books• superb customer service• intense loyalty + emotion
    86. 86. My challenge + request:
    87. 87. My challenge + request:Someone needs to design a web app store.
    88. 88. My challenge + request:Someone needs to design a web app store.
    89. 89. My challenge + request:Someone needs to design a web app store. Please!
    90. 90. j|ÄÄ çÉâ ÅtÜÜç ÅxR
    91. 91. How will mobile becomeyour competitive advantage?
    92. 92. kris.layon@gmail.com @klayon

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