Orientation to the Rural Workforce System

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Orientation materials for new members and interested public regarding the operations and composition of The Oregon Consortium & Oregon Workforce Alliance.

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  • This allows for all TOC board members to fully participate in all meetings … outlined in Consortium agreement
  • After this slide insert Kris’ graphic
  • Convener for rural area advocacy and program delivery, e.g. Bullet about rural CC and workforce collaboration
  • Assistance and advocacy in program development – e.g. state & federal waivers, monitoring national networks and sources for models, opportunities for program sustainability, and best practices
  • Robin will talk about Region 10 changes Reason not consistent because meeting needs of local communities
  • Orientation to the Rural Workforce System

    1. 1. Member Orientation / Questions and Answers
    2. 2. A vision for 2012: Get Skills or Be Poor <ul><li>To be the driving force behind an evolution in attitudes and behavior at every level including youth, current workers, unemployed/under employed, business and industry that embraces the “Get Skills or Be Poor” concept, ultimately revolutionizing our rural economies . </li></ul>
    3. 3. The Oregon Consortium & Oregon Workforce Alliance: <ul><li>Public / Private Partnership formed on behalf of 24 rural Oregon Counties </li></ul><ul><li>Helping Rural Oregon Work </li></ul>
    4. 4. Defining the Partnership: <ul><li>Formed in 1981 </li></ul><ul><li>ORS 190 with 24 counties as members </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose – provide the necessary framework for a Workforce Investment Area </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose – to alleviate unemployment and under employment </li></ul><ul><li>Lead by The Oregon Consortium Board of Directors </li></ul><ul><li>Formed in 1999 </li></ul><ul><li>Private sector lead </li></ul><ul><li>Required by the Workforce Investment Act </li></ul><ul><li>Certified by the Governor and recognized by US Dept. of Labor </li></ul><ul><li>Replaced the Private Industry Council </li></ul>The Oregon Consortium Oregon Workforce Alliance
    5. 5. Defining the Partnership: <ul><li>Formed in 1981 </li></ul><ul><li>ORS 190 with 24 counties as members </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose – provide the necessary framework for a Workforce Investment Area </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose – to alleviate unemployment and under employment </li></ul><ul><li>Lead by The Oregon Consortium Board of Directors </li></ul><ul><li>Formed in 1999 </li></ul><ul><li>Private sector lead </li></ul><ul><li>Required by the Workforce Investment Act </li></ul><ul><li>Certified by the Governor and recognized by US Dept. of Labor </li></ul><ul><li>Replaced the Private Industry Council </li></ul>The Oregon Consortium Oregon Workforce Alliance
    6. 6. Defining the Partnership: <ul><li>Formed in 1981 </li></ul><ul><li>ORS 190 with 24 counties as members </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose – provide the necessary framework for a Workforce Investment Area </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose – to alleviate unemployment and under employment </li></ul><ul><li>Lead by The Oregon Consortium Board of Directors </li></ul><ul><li>Formed in 1999 </li></ul><ul><li>Private sector lead </li></ul><ul><li>Required by the Workforce Investment Act </li></ul><ul><li>Certified by the Governor and recognized by US Dept. of Labor </li></ul><ul><li>Replaced the Private Industry Council </li></ul>The Oregon Consortium Oregon Workforce Alliance
    7. 7. Defining the Partnership: <ul><li>Formed in 1981 </li></ul><ul><li>ORS 190 with 24 counties as members </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose – provide the necessary framework for a Workforce Investment Area </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose – to alleviate unemployment and under employment </li></ul><ul><li>Lead by The Oregon Consortium Board of Directors </li></ul><ul><li>Formed in 1999 </li></ul><ul><li>Private sector lead </li></ul><ul><li>Required by the Workforce Investment Act </li></ul><ul><li>Certified by the Governor and recognized by US Dept. of Labor </li></ul><ul><li>Replaced the Private Industry Council </li></ul>The Oregon Consortium Oregon Workforce Alliance
    8. 8. The Partnership is responsible for: The Oregon Consortium & Oregon Workforce Alliance <ul><li>Strategic decisions related to the investment of Workforce Investment Act (WIA) funds; </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate use of invested funds; </li></ul><ul><li>Development of the rural one-stop / workforce system to meet community needs; </li></ul><ul><li>Policy and guidance for the one stop system; </li></ul><ul><li>Oversight and compliance of regional workforce boards and advisory groups; </li></ul><ul><li>Act as the fiscal agent for WIA, Governor’s Strategic Training Funds, Employer Workforce Training Fund, and various other grants and resources. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Oregon’s Local Workforce Investment Areas <ul><li>Oregon Workforce Alliance </li></ul><ul><li>worksystems, inc. </li></ul><ul><li>WICCO </li></ul><ul><li>The Enterprise </li></ul><ul><li>Community Services Consortium </li></ul><ul><li>Lane Workforce Investment Board </li></ul><ul><li>The Job Council </li></ul>7 Local Areas; Only TOC/OWA is Multi-Regional
    10. 10. The Oregon Consortium & Oregon Workforce Alliance - Workforce Investment Area <ul><li>Clatsop, Columbia, Tillamook; </li></ul><ul><li>Douglas </li></ul><ul><li>Coos, Curry </li></ul><ul><li>Gilliam, Hood River, Sherman, </li></ul><ul><li>Wasco, Wheeler </li></ul><ul><li>10 Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson </li></ul><ul><li>11 Klamath, Lake </li></ul><ul><li>12 Morrow, Umatilla </li></ul><ul><li>13 Baker, Union, Wallowa </li></ul><ul><li>14 Grant, Harney, Malheur </li></ul>Includes 9 Separate Workforce Regions:
    11. 11. The Oregon Consortium Board of Directors - Specifics <ul><li>24 members – one commissioner or judge from each member county </li></ul><ul><li>9 member Executive Committee – one member selected to represent each Workforce Region </li></ul><ul><li>All TOC Board members shall serve as ex-officio members of the Executive Committee and retain all rights as appropriate </li></ul>
    12. 12. TOC Board Member Responsibilities: <ul><li>Members are consulted during the course of the program </li></ul><ul><li>year on matters concerning; </li></ul><ul><li>the employment and training plan covering their jurisdiction (as necessary); </li></ul><ul><li>the supervision of operations in their jurisdiction; </li></ul><ul><li>the evaluation of local programs; </li></ul><ul><li>the selection of program operators within their jurisdiction; </li></ul><ul><li>the reallocation of funds within the local area (if necessary); </li></ul><ul><li>appointments to the OWA; and </li></ul><ul><li>other matters required by the Act or its regulations. </li></ul><ul><li>Because TOC provides the legal framework for the Area – they are the body that employs the Executive Director. Therefore TOC Board also provides guidance for the operations and function of the Administrative Office. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Oregon Workforce Alliance - Specifics <ul><li>Local Workforce Investment Board as defined in the Workforce Investment Act </li></ul><ul><li>49 Represented Positions Total; Appointed by the members of the TOC Board in accordance with WIA (Local Elected Officials / LEO’s) </li></ul><ul><li>27 members from business/industry </li></ul><ul><ul><li>3 from each region (ideally) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>10 “At-Large” Positions (labor, education, economic development) </li></ul><ul><li>12 “Mandatory One Stop Partners” </li></ul><ul><li>A member may be appointed to represent more than one category </li></ul>
    14. 14. Responsibilities according to Federal and State Law: <ul><li>Local plan development </li></ul><ul><li>Oversight of the One-Stop System </li></ul><ul><li>Selection of One-Stop Operator </li></ul><ul><li>Budget related to the duties of the Board </li></ul><ul><li>Determination / negotiation of area performance measures </li></ul><ul><li>Assisting the Governor in developing the employment statistics system under Wagner-Peyser </li></ul><ul><li>Coordination of workforce activities with economic development and employer linkages </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting private sector involvement in the system </li></ul><ul><li>Appointment of the OWA’s youth council (emerging worker committee) and coordination of services </li></ul>
    15. 15. OWA Member Responsibilities <ul><li>To be a communicator -- a conduit for information to and from the OWA, RWIB, business/industry, and One Stop System </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of local issues and represent industry, agency and associations at the Board table </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate and advocate as appropriate </li></ul><ul><li>Attend and participate fully in scheduled meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate the outcomes and initiatives of the OWA to RWIB, business/industry and One Stop System </li></ul><ul><li>Gain an understanding / knowledge about workforce and economic development initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Provide feedback to OWA and RWIB staff </li></ul>
    16. 16. TOC/OWA Responsibilities
    17. 17. TOC and OWA Shared Responsibilities: <ul><li>Employment Training Plans for the Area; </li></ul><ul><li>Designation of One Stop Operator; </li></ul><ul><li>Budget for carrying out the duties of the organization and boards; </li></ul><ul><li>Oversight of local programs – review, evaluation and performance; </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation of local performance measures. </li></ul>
    18. 18. TOC and OWA together have the potential to be an incredibly effective leadership network on behalf of rural Oregon!
    19. 19. The Role <ul><li>TOC/OWA is the policy making body for the 24 county area and provides a voice for rural Oregon’s workforce system; </li></ul><ul><li>Provides regions with the flexibility to develop RWIBs that meet regional needs; </li></ul><ul><li>Part of the funding conduit; </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a forum for discussion of the needs of rural communities; </li></ul>
    20. 20. Funding Flow
    21. 21. TOC / OWA Funding: Funds are allocated from Feds to the States, State Administration & Governor hold back what they deem appropriate / necessary and then allocate remaining funds to the Areas. TOC is unique in that we allocate using the exact same formula to the Regions in order to move maximum funds to WIA IB Providers in order to maintain service levels. This chart shows funds invested in program year 08* (July 1-June 30) to program year 07 and 06. *08 figures are pre-audit and may change.
    22. 22. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act … <ul><li>The Area benefited from an investment of ARRA funds: </li></ul><ul><li>Adult $1,518,633 </li></ul><ul><li>Youth $3,465,659 </li></ul><ul><li>Dislocated Worker $2,831,804 </li></ul><ul><li>The OWA acted quickly to communicate their expectations regarding the use of these funds: </li></ul><ul><li>Invest the funds quickly and wisely, in response to the crisis – funds will not be marshaled for the future; </li></ul><ul><li>Expand and augment current offerings, expanding the bandwidth of our local services; </li></ul><ul><li>Invest heavily in skills and post-secondary training; and </li></ul><ul><li>Be ready to report back to Congress and the public regarding the return on their investments (program performance, outcomes, etc.). </li></ul>
    23. 23. The Role … <ul><li>TOC/OWA staff roles are predominantly administrative in nature - financial and contracts management, quality assurance, compliance and technical support; </li></ul><ul><li>Support RWIB staff and members, regional providers; </li></ul><ul><li>Legal mechanism and opportunities to share funding between regions, to assure dollars are available to meet needs; </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a means for increased flexibility at the regional level </li></ul><ul><li>Assistance and advocacy in program development </li></ul>
    24. 24. RWIBs <ul><li>Vary in make up, staff meetings, and focus; </li></ul><ul><li>Create a regional vision, strategies, and goals within the confines of state and federal law, and which support the broad strategies, goals and policies of TOC/OWA; </li></ul><ul><li>Develop and enhance partnerships related to workforce, economic and community development; </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitate One-Stop Certification process at the regional level </li></ul><ul><li>TOC receives $31,250/RWIB. It is not known if these funds will continue to made available given looming rescission issues. </li></ul>
    25. 25. RWIB RESPONSIBILITIES ACCORDING TO THE STATE STATUTE: <ul><li>In concurrence with Chief Elected Official and the LWIB (OWA): </li></ul><ul><li>Develop unique, regional performance measures if desired; </li></ul><ul><li>Provide input to appropriate parts of the Area 5 Year plan; </li></ul><ul><li>Provide oversight to local workforce activities in coordination with OWA staff; </li></ul><ul><li>Establish, as deemed appropriate, regional youth committees to build a comprehensive youth strategy for the region; </li></ul><ul><li>Identify regional training and service providers in accordance with OWA policy to be included on the ETP List. </li></ul>
    26. 26. Current Committees: <ul><li>Emerging Worker </li></ul><ul><li>Business and Industry </li></ul><ul><li>System Partners </li></ul><ul><li>Communications and Membership </li></ul><ul><li>Governmental Relations </li></ul>
    27. 27. Find What you Need on our Website… www.tocowa.org
    28. 28. Call Anytime <ul><li>Kris Latimer – CEO </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Toll Free 1.866.888.4862 x219 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cell 541.979.9160 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Elisha Schilling – Executive Assistant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>X210 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul>

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