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Storytelling: Tools of Engagement

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Short presentation on the elements of storytelling used in Karl Kapp's presentation.

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Storytelling: Tools of Engagement

  1. 1. Twitter:@kkapp Tools of Engagement: "Tools of Engagement: Storytelling By Karl M. Kapp
  2. 2. Story Creation Steps 1. Identify Learning Objective – Choose Only One 2. Choose Characters (Teacher/Learner) 3. Create Plot (What Happens) 4. Develop Questions (Advance Plot) – Only use one-two questions. 5. Create Tension (Between Characters) 6. Develop Resolution
  3. 3. Let’s Examine the Elements of the Story
  4. 4. Parts of a Story…
  5. 5. Stories need Characters… http://tinyurl.com/txstory
  6. 6. Stories need Plot… What is happening…
  7. 7. Stories need Tension…
  8. 8. Stories need Resolution…
  9. 9. Stories need Resolution…
  10. 10. Stories need Conclusion…
  11. 11. 1. Characters Stories Need 2. Plot (something has to happen). 3. Tension 4. Resolution 5. Conclusion
  12. 12. Storytelling
  13. 13. Researchers have found that the human brain has a natural affinity for narrative construction. Yep, People tend to remember facts more accurately if they encounter them in a story rather than in a list. And they rate legal arguments as more convincing when built into narrative tales rather than on legal precedent. Carey, B. (2007) this is Your Life (and How You Tell it). The New York Times. Melanie Green http://www.unc.edu/~mcgreen/research.html. Chapter 2 “The Gamification of Learning and Instruction.
  14. 14. Speer, N. K., Reynolds, J. R., Swallow, K. M., & Zacks, J. M. (2009). Reading Stories Activates Neural Representations of Visual and Motor Experiences.Psychological Science, 20(8), 989–999. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.2009.02397.x When a person reads about certain activities in a story, the areas of the brain associated with those activities are activated. The research found that different brain regions track different aspects of a story. If the character moved, the corresponding region of the brain for physical movement became active.
  15. 15. Story Type Goal of Story Expressive Teach content or convey existing information. Strategic Promote certain ways of working or thinking—cultural shifts. Reflective Captures complexities embedded within a situation or points out absurdities of a current state of affairs. Transformative Describe a possible new future or a new way of operating. Alterio, Maxine & McDrury, Janice. Learning Through Storytelling in Higher Education: Using Reflection and Experience to Improve Learning. Routledge. 2003.
  16. 16. Become a Story Connoisseur—Observe how movie makers, television directors, and novelists craft stories. Ask to Hear Stories—When debriefing a person providing information for a course, ask for stories illustrating key points. Ask Story Questions—Stories follow a structure, ask structured questions around which stories are built.
  17. 17. 90 Days of Premium: Free 1. Create a free account 2. Email code: K_Kapp to support@polleverywhere.com Automatically downgrades to the standard free plan after 90 days
  18. 18. Questions…
  19. 19. Story Creation Steps 1. Identify Learning Objective – Choose Only One 2. Choose Characters (Teacher/Learner) 3. Create Plot (What Happens) 4. Develop Questions (Advance Plot) – Only use one-two questions. 5. Create Tension (Between Characters) 6. Develop Resolution

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