Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Calamity & Creativity in 
Chemistry 
Alternative Assessment to Promote 
Information Literacy 
Dr Katherine J. Haxton 
k.j....
https://www.flickr.com/photos/colinkinner/ CC-BY-2.0
Students as… 
Digital Citizens 
Science Communicators 
Creators (of content) 
Change Agents 
[First sunk in at #VicePhec14...
Levels of Thinking 
macroscopic 
microscopic symbolic 
Johnstone, A.H. , various publications, as summarised at: 
http://w...
Levels of Thinking 
macroscopic 
human 
microscopic symbolic 
“Moving Chemistry Education into 3D: A Tetrahedral Metaphor ...
Students identifying an area of a 
(broad) topic that they are interested 
in, carrying out research then 
producing an as...
Act 1: Information Retrieval 
Specific to this assignment, the outcomes are: 
1. Evaluate chemical information on the inte...
Someone was wrong on the internet 
“It is a strong acid but it’s the chemistry 
of HF that makes it dissolve glass (and 
b...
Act 2: Screencast Presentation 
Produce a 5 minute presentation suitable for 
upload to a blog. 
- screencast or video or ...
Act 3: Infographic 
Produce an infographic on a topic related to 
sustainable chemistry [1st/2nd year module]. 
Produce an...
Next Steps 
Offering final year projects for 3rd year students 
to improve 1st year experiments. 
CC-BY-NC-2.0 http://www....
Conclusions 
Students researching and creating content 
Enormous opportunities afforded by technology 
- screencasts, podc...
Rule of thumb 
• It will take a lot of hours to get it working. 
• With luck it will work for two years 
• Then the rug wi...
Sources of Inspiration & 
Enlightenment 
Prof. Simon Lancaster (UEA) 
Dr Stephen Ashworth (UEA) 
Dr Michael Seery (DIT) 
P...
Calamity & Creativity in Chemistry
Calamity & Creativity in Chemistry
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Calamity & Creativity in Chemistry

2,015 views

Published on

Calamity & Creativity in Chemistry: Alternative Assessment to Promote Information Literacy
Presented at the RSC Teaching Fellow's meeting in Liverpool, September 2014.

Published in: Education

Calamity & Creativity in Chemistry

  1. 1. Calamity & Creativity in Chemistry Alternative Assessment to Promote Information Literacy Dr Katherine J. Haxton k.j.haxton@keele.ac.uk @kjhaxton
  2. 2. https://www.flickr.com/photos/colinkinner/ CC-BY-2.0
  3. 3. Students as… Digital Citizens Science Communicators Creators (of content) Change Agents [First sunk in at #VicePhec14, August 2014, Dr Barry Ryan http://www.slideshare.net/BarryRyan1/vice-phec-2014- assessments-for-learning ]
  4. 4. Levels of Thinking macroscopic microscopic symbolic Johnstone, A.H. , various publications, as summarised at: http://www.rsc.org/images/ahj%20overview%20final_tcm18-52107.pdf
  5. 5. Levels of Thinking macroscopic human microscopic symbolic “Moving Chemistry Education into 3D: A Tetrahedral Metaphor for Understanding Chemistry”, Mahaffy, J. Chem. Ed. 83, 2006, 49
  6. 6. Students identifying an area of a (broad) topic that they are interested in, carrying out research then producing an assessable output with a degree of flexibility… …this could end badly!
  7. 7. Act 1: Information Retrieval Specific to this assignment, the outcomes are: 1. Evaluate chemical information on the internet and identify potentially inaccurate information. 2. Use recommended textbooks to verify the accuracy of information obtained on the internet. 3. Create screenshots and paste them into a Word document. 4. Reference webpages and textbooks using the Vancouver reference style, noting the importance of ‘date accessed’ when referencing webpages. 5. Clearly identify and reference one instance of inaccurate chemical information and propose corrections to the information, or validate corrections already made.
  8. 8. Someone was wrong on the internet “It is a strong acid but it’s the chemistry of HF that makes it dissolve glass (and body parts) and not its super “strength”.” http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine- 23710654 http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/beauty/news-features/ TMG9598248/The-green-guide-to-chemical-free-beauty. html
  9. 9. Act 2: Screencast Presentation Produce a 5 minute presentation suitable for upload to a blog. - screencast or video or powerpoint w/audio Topics include: inorganic chemistry, sustainability and environmental chemistry, space chemistry Use self- and peer- assessment to evaluate the presentations. Require reflection by the students on their work. Demand more than ‘submit and forget’.
  10. 10. Act 3: Infographic Produce an infographic on a topic related to sustainable chemistry [1st/2nd year module]. Produce an infographic to revise a concept in 3rd year inorganic reaction mechanisms. 1 side of A4 for the infographic. Submit a reference list (recommend asking for an annotated bibliography). Give examples of infographics, emphasise difference to poster.
  11. 11. Next Steps Offering final year projects for 3rd year students to improve 1st year experiments. CC-BY-NC-2.0 http://www.flickr.com/photos/draconianrain/
  12. 12. Conclusions Students researching and creating content Enormous opportunities afforded by technology - screencasts, podcasts, presentations - posters, infographics - blogs, wikis, websites Opportunities for Peer Learning through Peer Assessment
  13. 13. Rule of thumb • It will take a lot of hours to get it working. • With luck it will work for two years • Then the rug will be pulled away. • And you will have to do something else. [Martin Pitt, RSC Teaching Fellows Meeting]
  14. 14. Sources of Inspiration & Enlightenment Prof. Simon Lancaster (UEA) Dr Stephen Ashworth (UEA) Dr Michael Seery (DIT) Prof. Tina Overton (Hull) Dr Peter Knight (Keele) Dr Jane Essex (Brunel) Dr Barry Ryan (DIT) Dr Suzanne Fergus (Hertfordshire) Felix Janeway (Leeds)

×