Romanticism Intro

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Romanticism Intro

  1. 1. R o m a n t i c i s m An Introduction
  2. 2. Comparison of Issues: The Classic vs. The Romantic Awareness Insight Essential values Unconscious (subconscious) Conscious Depth Surface Meaning Freedom Experimentation Meaning Control Rules Structure
  3. 3. Comparison of Issues: The Classic vs. The Romantic Control Aesthetics Source Passion and Emotion Objectivity “ Insights to the Mind and Heart” “ Delight and Instruct” Right Brain Left Brain
  4. 4. Core Concepts I <ul><li>Historic Setting : Early 19th century peak, particularly strong in France but spreads quickly throughout Europe and to a lesser degree, the US. </li></ul><ul><li>Industrialization and urbanization forced rapid relocations in populations; displacement and painful modernizations created yearning for relief and escape. Links to revolution/change. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Core Concepts II Attitude : On one hand it is a similar idea to Neoclassicism in that it sought to create a certain atmosphere (idealism) as a remedy to modern life . Yet it was opposed to Neoclassicism in all of its manifestations (visually and philosophically).
  6. 6. Core Concepts III exuberant life individualized experience spirit of revolution (France, 1848) drama, exotica complexity/dualisms (Napoleon is the typical example) awe of nature the sublime
  7. 7. Gericault, Raft of the Medusa - considered to be first work in this direction
  8. 8. Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People – example of work from the greatest Romantic artist
  9. 9. Gros, Napoleon Visiting the Plague-stricken at Jaffra - what makes Napoleon a Romantic hero?
  10. 10. West, Death of General Wolfe – multiple themes: fallen spiritual leader, heaven and earth, spectrum of human condition,“noble savage”
  11. 11. Borrowing of theme and compostion
  12. 13. The Sublime <ul><li>elevated or lofty in thought, language Paradise Lost is sublime poetry . </li></ul><ul><li>2. impressing the mind with a sense of grandeur or power; inspiring awe, veneration </li></ul><ul><li>Switzerland has sublime scenery. </li></ul><ul><li>3. supreme or outstanding </li></ul><ul><li>a sublime dinner </li></ul>
  13. 14. Fuseli, The Nightmare
  14. 15. Turner, The Slave Ship
  15. 16. Not limited to painting <ul><li>Fantasy architecture </li></ul><ul><li>including Gothick Follies </li></ul><ul><li>such as this tower </li></ul><ul><li>in Stowe, England </li></ul>
  16. 17. Nash, Royal Pavilion at Brighton
  17. 19. Garnier, Opera House, Paris

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