Imagining the Ecological Inuit:  A Case Study of The Arctic Inuit Culture Written and Presented by Stina Miller
The Inuit <ul><li>Inuit of the Arctic: Alaska, Canada, Labrador, and Greenland </li></ul><ul><li>Relying mostly on fish, s...
Home Sweet Home: Nunavut <ul><li>Rankin Inlet and Bylot </li></ul><ul><li>Island </li></ul>
The Community & Culture <ul><li>Social status: responsibilities of men, women, children, elders </li></ul><ul><li>No word ...
The Power of A Name: <ul><li>Inummarik:  “Genuine Self” </li></ul><ul><li>Naming is a central pillar in Inuit culture, fro...
Inuit Identity & Animals  <ul><li>Generosity is part of Inummarik – sharing of animal = sharing the belief and practices o...
The Cultural Practice of Eating: Hunting <ul><li>Hunting: tradition, rite of passage,  </li></ul><ul><li>main mode of subs...
The Cultural Practice of Eating: Gathering <ul><li>Gathering: Mostly a hunting society </li></ul><ul><li>Summer climate br...
Physiological and Anatomical Adaptations <ul><li>Allen’s Rule:  Cold climates mean decrease in visible extremities </li></...
Cultural Adaptations:  <ul><li>Living:  Igloo’s are only used in traditions and for show, most have permanent lodging  </l...
Environmental Conditions: <ul><li>“ Tundra”: conditions of north pole </li></ul><ul><li>Ecological mindset:  no distinguis...
Misconceptions and Stereotypes: <ul><li>Nomads </li></ul><ul><li>Baby-killer’s and supporters of “killing the old people!”...
Tides of Change <ul><li>Environmental changes </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of isolation: westernization in the arctic </li></ul>...
Conclusion: <ul><li>“ isolated” landscape, isolated people </li></ul><ul><li>A great culture to study because of their uni...
Resources Used: <ul><li>Research Material: </li></ul><ul><li>Brody, Hugh.  The Other Side of Eden: Hunters, Farmers, and T...
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Imagining the Ecological Inuit

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This is my powerpoint presentation I created for my Human Ecology course. We were asked to conduct research on a hunter-gatherer case study and present our findings to the class.

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Imagining the Ecological Inuit

  1. 1. Imagining the Ecological Inuit: A Case Study of The Arctic Inuit Culture Written and Presented by Stina Miller
  2. 2. The Inuit <ul><li>Inuit of the Arctic: Alaska, Canada, Labrador, and Greenland </li></ul><ul><li>Relying mostly on fish, sea mammals, and land animals for food (caribou, birds, ground squirrels, foxes) </li></ul><ul><li>Were nomads, now </li></ul><ul><li>live mostly in permanent </li></ul><ul><li>dwellings </li></ul>
  3. 3. Home Sweet Home: Nunavut <ul><li>Rankin Inlet and Bylot </li></ul><ul><li>Island </li></ul>
  4. 4. The Community & Culture <ul><li>Social status: responsibilities of men, women, children, elders </li></ul><ul><li>No word for male or female, no differing social status </li></ul><ul><li>Learning: Isumaqsayuq = learning by doing – observation and imitation that occurs within the daily community </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Power of A Name: <ul><li>Inummarik: “Genuine Self” </li></ul><ul><li>Naming is a central pillar in Inuit culture, from the naming of people to that of the environment and animals </li></ul><ul><li>Passing on a name: the continuation of a life, a never-ending people as they are passed down to each new generation. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Inuit Identity & Animals <ul><li>Generosity is part of Inummarik – sharing of animal = sharing the belief and practices of that animal </li></ul><ul><li>The Inuit identity does not leave room for a seperation of the human, animal, and material communities (Stairs, 120). </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Cultural Practice of Eating: Hunting <ul><li>Hunting: tradition, rite of passage, </li></ul><ul><li>main mode of subsistence, man’s job </li></ul><ul><li>Ecocentric actions: “ an active process…what is most true of the individual [and] their deepest sense of self (Stairs, 120).” </li></ul><ul><li>Hunting is part of their identity – without it, </li></ul><ul><li>“ an Inuit ceases to be </li></ul><ul><li>an Inuk (Stairs, 125).” </li></ul>
  8. 8. The Cultural Practice of Eating: Gathering <ul><li>Gathering: Mostly a hunting society </li></ul><ul><li>Summer climate brings bird and caribou migration, fox hunts, and much more fishing </li></ul><ul><li>Narwhal = </li></ul><ul><li>High in nutrition </li></ul>
  9. 9. Physiological and Anatomical Adaptations <ul><li>Allen’s Rule: Cold climates mean decrease in visible extremities </li></ul><ul><li>Light skin </li></ul><ul><li>Short stature and features </li></ul><ul><li>Higher cold tolerance </li></ul><ul><li>Dark hair for heat absorption </li></ul>
  10. 10. Cultural Adaptations: <ul><li>Living: Igloo’s are only used in traditions and for show, most have permanent lodging </li></ul><ul><li>Tools: Guns, snowmobiles, fishing equipment, western clothing, cooking utensils, modern modes of living </li></ul><ul><li>Society: Little to no social rules, deviation from the norm is not subject to expulsion </li></ul>
  11. 11. Environmental Conditions: <ul><li>“ Tundra”: conditions of north pole </li></ul><ul><li>Ecological mindset: no distinguishing environment from concepts of identity </li></ul><ul><li>Language reflects landscape: various words for snow and landscapes, there is no generic words. </li></ul><ul><li>Route markers </li></ul>
  12. 12. Misconceptions and Stereotypes: <ul><li>Nomads </li></ul><ul><li>Baby-killer’s and supporters of “killing the old people!” </li></ul><ul><li>Merely surviving, not living </li></ul><ul><li>“ Primitive” in their lifestyle and social structure </li></ul><ul><li>Romanticizing the simple life: in contrast, Inuit cultures depend greatly on complex interdependency with the human, natural, and environmental community </li></ul><ul><li>The reversal of Western thought: instead of independence, becoming increasingly grounded in a community is central </li></ul>
  13. 13. Tides of Change <ul><li>Environmental changes </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of isolation: westernization in the arctic </li></ul><ul><li>A melting home: changes in environment changes animal habitats and therefore Inuit culture </li></ul>
  14. 14. Conclusion: <ul><li>“ isolated” landscape, isolated people </li></ul><ul><li>A great culture to study because of their unique view of living </li></ul><ul><li>Pressure from agriculturalist societies </li></ul><ul><li>Although environmental changes have pressured the Inuit culture into changing some of their ecological practices, they were never a static culture </li></ul>
  15. 15. Resources Used: <ul><li>Research Material: </li></ul><ul><li>Brody, Hugh. The Other Side of Eden: Hunters, Farmers, and The Shaping of The World . New York: North Point, 2001. Print </li></ul><ul><li>Stairs, Arlene. &quot;Self-Image, World-Image: Speculations on Identity from Experiences with Inuit.&quot; Ethos 20.1 (1992): 116-26. JSTOR . Web </li></ul><ul><li>Sutton, Mark Q., and Eugene N. Anderson. Introduction to Cultural Ecology . Lanham, MD: AltaMira, 2010. Print </li></ul><ul><li>Photos: </li></ul><ul><li>http://assets.panda.org/img/inuit_hidden_treasure_301787.jpg </li></ul><ul><li>http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/where_we_work/arctic/news/cop_15/virtual_tour_of_the_arctic_tent/ </li></ul>

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