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john a. powell Director, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity Williams Chair in Civil Rights & Civil Liber...
About the Kirwan Institute <ul><li>Founded in 2003 </li></ul><ul><li>Multidisciplinary applied research institute </li></u...
Current Giving OSU Minority Alumni:  87,513 OSU Minority Alumni Donors:  34,436  Data source: University Communications da...
Current Student Demographics Data source: OSU Statistical Summary Race/Ethnic Group % of Total Enrollment, University-wide...
Looking to the Future By 2050, 40% of young OSU alumni will be minorities. Data source: University Communications database
Questions guiding today’s conversation: <ul><li>How do you reach out to this ever-expanding pool of potential donors of co...
What is said & What is perceived <ul><li>Communication goes beyond the words we use.  There are conscious and subconscious...
Word Choice Matters <ul><li>Using “minority” to refer to people of color is outdated and tends to carry a subordinate conn...
Implicit Bias <ul><li>Only  2 %   of emotional cognition is available to us consciously  </li></ul><ul><li>Racial bias ten...
Framing How messages are framed affects how they are perceived.
Mottino, Felinda and Eugene D. Miller.  “Pathways for Change: Philanthropy among African American, Asian American and Lati...
Strategic Giving Matrix Adapted from Susan Wisely and Elizabeth Lynn, Toward a Fourth Philanthropic Response: American Phi...
Adjusting Frames <ul><li>Understanding the way you frame messages can help your outreach to prospective donors of color. <...
Framing for Asian Americans <ul><li>The first donation to a formal nonprofit outside the ethnic community is often the Uni...
Outreach to Asian Americans <ul><li>A personal “ask” from a well-respected friend or business associate is most effective....
Framing for Latinos <ul><li>Familial and culturally-based factors dominate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex., a sense of personal ...
American Indian Philanthropy <ul><li>The building of  personal relationships  must  precede any solicitation of funds. </l...
Outreach to Latinos <ul><li>Respond to appeals by community leaders – both Latino and non-Latino </li></ul><ul><li>Prefere...
African American Philanthropy: Past <ul><li>From late  1600s to 1970s  -   3 defining characteristics: </li></ul><ul><ul><...
African American Philanthropy: Present <ul><li>A shift is occurring:  Black philanthropy is more likely to be driven by in...
Giving in the African American Community THEN NOW Polycarpe, Marjorie.  “Black Philanthropy: Harnessing a Growing Resource...
Framing & Outreach for African Americans <ul><li>Highlight the African American tradition of giving </li></ul><ul><li>Tang...
Stages of Giving <ul><li>Donors of color tend to go through several stages of giving, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don...
Cultural Competence <ul><li>You can’t use the same “ask” that you used for white donors for donors of color. </li></ul><ul...
Understanding Prospective Donors <ul><li>What is salient about the prospective donor’s identity?  </li></ul><ul><li>How is...
Concluding Insights <ul><li>Communities of color are growing in terms of both size and quantity of assets </li></ul><ul><l...
www.KirwanInstitute.org KirwanInstitute   on: www.Transforming-Race.org www.race-talk.org
<ul><li>Links to Additional Resources </li></ul>
Resources <ul><li>http://www.givingforum.org/s_forum/bin.asp?CID=49&DID=6461&DOC=FILE.PDF </li></ul><ul><li>http://foundat...
<ul><li>Efforts at Georgetown University </li></ul><ul><li>Information from email contact with a Georgetown University Afr...
African American Advisory Board <ul><li>As outreach to African American alumni, the President created an African American ...
AAAB Successes <ul><li>The AAAB has increased visibility of AA alumni on campus at various events,  increased donor giving...
Georgetown’s AAAB: The University’s Efforts <ul><li>The University has provided financial and staff support for this annua...
Georgetown’s Affinity Groups <ul><li>While the University is not in a position to establish boards for all minority groups...
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Connecting with Donors of Color

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Connecting with Donors of Color

  1. 1. john a. powell Director, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity Williams Chair in Civil Rights & Civil Liberties, Moritz College of Law OSU - University Development Tuesday, March 9, 2010
  2. 2. About the Kirwan Institute <ul><li>Founded in 2003 </li></ul><ul><li>Multidisciplinary applied research institute </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Our mission is to expand opportunity for all, especially for our most marginalized communities </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Current Giving OSU Minority Alumni: 87,513 OSU Minority Alumni Donors: 34,436 Data source: University Communications database
  4. 4. Current Student Demographics Data source: OSU Statistical Summary Race/Ethnic Group % of Total Enrollment, University-wide African Americans 6.2% Asian Americans 4.9% Hispanics 2.5% American Indians 0.4%
  5. 5. Looking to the Future By 2050, 40% of young OSU alumni will be minorities. Data source: University Communications database
  6. 6. Questions guiding today’s conversation: <ul><li>How do you reach out to this ever-expanding pool of potential donors of color? </li></ul><ul><li>How can you connect with these racial/ethnic groups in ways that are impactful? </li></ul><ul><li>What messages or themes resonate with these individuals? </li></ul><ul><li>Donors can give to anyone, anywhere, any time. Why invest in a university? </li></ul>
  7. 7. What is said & What is perceived <ul><li>Communication goes beyond the words we use. There are conscious and subconscious aspects to it. </li></ul><ul><li>Our interactions with prospective donors of color can be informed by the mind sciences. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Word Choice Matters <ul><li>Using “minority” to refer to people of color is outdated and tends to carry a subordinate connotation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Whites are projected to no longer be a statistical majority by 2042. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Context: Numeric or Sociological? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>We already have “minority-majority” cities and states. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Implicit Bias <ul><li>Only 2 % of emotional cognition is available to us consciously </li></ul><ul><li>Racial bias tends to reside in the unconscious network </li></ul><ul><li>Messages can be framed to speak to our unconscious </li></ul>
  10. 10. Framing How messages are framed affects how they are perceived.
  11. 11. Mottino, Felinda and Eugene D. Miller. “Pathways for Change: Philanthropy among African American, Asian American and Latino Donors in the New York Metropolitan Region.” Sept. 2004.
  12. 12. Strategic Giving Matrix Adapted from Susan Wisely and Elizabeth Lynn, Toward a Fourth Philanthropic Response: American Philanthropy and Its Public. Essentials for Diversity in Giving (EDG) © Changemakers. Module 3 worksheet
  13. 13. Adjusting Frames <ul><li>Understanding the way you frame messages can help your outreach to prospective donors of color. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What motivates them? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Research contains insights about the frames and outreach strategies to which donors of color generally respond. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Framing for Asian Americans <ul><li>The first donation to a formal nonprofit outside the ethnic community is often the United Way or an alma mater. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As giving continues, these groups often do not remain the top priorities. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gifts to universities reflect “gratitude toward their schools for preparing them for success.” </li></ul><ul><li>Education and scholarships are among the </li></ul><ul><li>causes that “receive the most frequent, </li></ul><ul><li>if not largest, gifts.” </li></ul>Chao, Jessica. “Asian American Philanthropy: Expanding Circles of Participation.” in Cultures of Caring: Philanthropy in Diverse American Communities. Council on Foundations, June 1999.
  15. 15. Outreach to Asian Americans <ul><li>A personal “ask” from a well-respected friend or business associate is most effective. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The asker’s level of prestige matters. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ Family gifts are an appealing fundraising tool for universities and museums. Gifts named in memory of a deceased family member also hold appeal.” </li></ul><ul><li>Most $1m (or more) gifts from Asian Americans are for capital projects. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The most frequent contribution to an endowment was to the alma matter in response to an ongoing, publicized capital campaign. ” </li></ul></ul>Chao, Jessica. “Asian American Philanthropy: Expanding Circles of Participation.” in Cultures of Caring: Philanthropy in Diverse American Communities. Council on Foundations, June 1999.
  16. 16. Framing for Latinos <ul><li>Familial and culturally-based factors dominate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex., a sense of personal responsibility to one’s relatives and kin </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ Desire to facilitate Latino equality and acculturation within U.S. society” </li></ul><ul><li>Concerns over youth development and education issues </li></ul>Ramos, Henry A.J. “Latino Philanthropy: Expanding U.S. Models of Giving and Civic Participation.” in Cultures of Caring: Philanthropy in Diverse American Communities. Council on Foundations, June 1999.
  17. 17. American Indian Philanthropy <ul><li>The building of personal relationships must precede any solicitation of funds. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Approach with “honor, respect, and patience” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Frame requests in terms of the needs of individual members of the Native community (if/when possible). </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize that donors may not desire public recognition of their giving. </li></ul>Peck, Kay C. 2002. “Philanthropy and American Indians: Ancient Traditions Meet Modern Giving.” New Directions For Philanthropic Fundraising 37: 55-63.
  18. 18. Outreach to Latinos <ul><li>Respond to appeals by community leaders – both Latino and non-Latino </li></ul><ul><li>Preference for organizations with which they are familiar & have positive experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Address immediate needs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>NOT capital campaigns, endowments, etc. </li></ul></ul>Ramos, Henry A.J. “Latino Philanthropy: Expanding U.S. Models of Giving and Civic Participation.” in Cultures of Caring: Philanthropy in Diverse American Communities. Council on Foundations, June 1999.
  19. 19. African American Philanthropy: Past <ul><li>From late 1600s to 1970s - 3 defining characteristics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Collective philanthropy promoted communal (rather than individual) interests </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blacks pooled modest amounts from multiple individuals (rather than individuals making major contributions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Was transformative: Sought to improve the socioeconomic status of African Americans via self-help and social protest </li></ul></ul>Carson, Emmett D. Black Philanthropy’s Past, Present, and Future. New Directions for Philanthropic Fundraising 48 (2005): 5-12.
  20. 20. African American Philanthropy: Present <ul><li>A shift is occurring: Black philanthropy is more likely to be driven by individual interests rather than communal needs. </li></ul><ul><li>3 reasons for this shift: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Some Blacks have significant wealth and can make large gifts consistent with their personal charitable interests. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less racial discrimination lessens the obligation for race-focused giving. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Black churches and nonprofits are no longer central to Black philanthropy. </li></ul></ul>Carson, Emmett D. Black Philanthropy’s Past, Present, and Future. New Directions for Philanthropic Fundraising 48 (2005): 5-12.
  21. 21. Giving in the African American Community THEN NOW Polycarpe, Marjorie. “Black Philanthropy: Harnessing a Growing Resource.” onPhilanthropy 6 Aug 2004.
  22. 22. Framing & Outreach for African Americans <ul><li>Highlight the African American tradition of giving </li></ul><ul><li>Tangible causes, annual appeals, and impulse giving seem to be the most common approaches to giving. </li></ul><ul><li>Address immediate needs rather than endowments </li></ul>Winters, Mary-Frances. “Reflections on Endowment Building in the African-American Community.” http://www.cof.org/files/Documents/Publications/Cultures_of_Caring/africanamerican.pdf? Polycarpe, Marjorie. “Black Philanthropy: Harnessing a Growing Resource.” onPhilanthropy 6 Aug 2004.; photo: sxc.hu nosheep
  23. 23. Stages of Giving <ul><li>Donors of color tend to go through several stages of giving, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Donating to causes specific to their race/ethnicity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Donating to mainstream causes, but earmarking money for specific racial/ethnic groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Donating in an effort to influence whole institutions </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Cultural Competence <ul><li>You can’t use the same “ask” that you used for white donors for donors of color. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider how racial, ethnic, and other dynamics shape that person’s interests and goals. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How are they situated? </li></ul></ul>http://www.givingforum.org/s_forum/bin.asp?CID=49&DID=6461&DOC=FILE.PDF
  25. 25. Understanding Prospective Donors <ul><li>What is salient about the prospective donor’s identity? </li></ul><ul><li>How is he/she situated? </li></ul>Race? Gender? Marital Status? Age? Ethnicity? Geographic Location?
  26. 26. Concluding Insights <ul><li>Communities of color are growing in terms of both size and quantity of assets </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone has the potential to give </li></ul><ul><li>Outreach should be framed to resonate with the target group </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on building relationships / direct connections </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural competence is central to forging these bonds </li></ul>
  27. 27. www.KirwanInstitute.org KirwanInstitute on: www.Transforming-Race.org www.race-talk.org
  28. 28. <ul><li>Links to Additional Resources </li></ul>
  29. 29. Resources <ul><li>http://www.givingforum.org/s_forum/bin.asp?CID=49&DID=6461&DOC=FILE.PDF </li></ul><ul><li>http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/topical/minorities.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.21cf.org/pdf/LegacyOfGiving.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>http://classic.cof.org/Learn/content.cfm?ItemNumber=842 </li></ul><ul><li>http://archive.changemakers.com/?s=31&n=14 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.philanthropy.org/publications/online_publications.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.philanthropy.org/programs/documents/PathwaysforChange_ExecSummary_000.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>http://library.generousgiving.org/page.asp?sec=28&page=462 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.independentsector.org/programs/research/GandVRace.html </li></ul>
  30. 30. <ul><li>Efforts at Georgetown University </li></ul><ul><li>Information from email contact with a Georgetown University African American Advisory Board member </li></ul>
  31. 31. African American Advisory Board <ul><li>As outreach to African American alumni, the President created an African American Advisory Board (AAAB) </li></ul><ul><li>The goal of the AAAB is to advise the University on how to better engage African American alumni as well as assist in fundraising efforts. </li></ul><ul><li>Founded in June 2000 </li></ul>
  32. 32. AAAB Successes <ul><li>The AAAB has increased visibility of AA alumni on campus at various events, increased donor giving by over 20% by AA alumni , and provided valuable counsel on issues related to AA students. </li></ul><ul><li>The AAAB created an anchor event that is part of homecoming. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This annual dinner honors distinguished AA alum and raises money for scholarships for AA students. </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. Georgetown’s AAAB: The University’s Efforts <ul><li>The University has provided financial and staff support for this annual dinner. </li></ul><ul><li>They have also supported AA-centric events at reunion and increased outreach to AA alumni for other major University events. </li></ul><ul><li>The University has also increased outreach efforts to AA alumni to invite them to apply to become a Board of Governor, a highly competitive board position at the University. While the acceptance rates are low, the outreach has identified additional service opportunities for AA alumni , as we have data that shows increased services yields increased contributions. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Georgetown’s Affinity Groups <ul><li>While the University is not in a position to establish boards for all minority groups, the University has created affinity groups. These groups provide a platform for groups of connected alumni to be engaged in University life and receive staff support from the Office of Advancement. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Georgetown Entertainment and Media Association (GEMA), which was founded by an alum who is now head of a major media company. GEMA engages any alum involved in media. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>GEMA holds annual fundraisers that supports scholarships, hosts major events on campus and supports a robust mentoring program for students. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Wall Street Alliance, comprised of GU alum on Wall Street, many who are also African American </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Latino Alliance, which hosts events and fundraisers to support scholarships and academic content related to Latin culture on campus. </li></ul></ul>

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