Film Making & Movie Training Secrets - David Hoffman

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Filmmaking is one of the most competitive fields on the planet. In
order to have any chance in heck of making it, you need more than
just talent (though that certainly helps).
You need an inside track and some expert advice.
This free report that you are now reading, is going to give you just
that. In it, you will be getting some of the best tips from some of the
greatest filmmakers of all time including…
Steven Spielberg
Quentin Tarantino
Sam Raimi
Alfred Hitchcock
David Hoffman
The information in those reports is priceless. I hope you will use it and
take the advice in it to heart. These are people who obviously know
what they’re talking about.

Kirby Dillard,
movietraining.net

Published in: Entertainment & Humor
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Film Making & Movie Training Secrets - David Hoffman

  1. 1. Top Experts Film Making Secrets By Kirby Dillard Movietraining.net
  2. 2. Introduction Filmmaking is one of the most competitive fields on the planet. In order to have any chance in heck of making it, you need more than just talent (though that certainly helps). You need an inside track and some expert advice. This report that you are now reading, is going to give you just that. In it, you will be getting some of the best tips from some of the greatest filmmakers of all time including… • Steven Spielberg • Quentin Tarantino • Sam Raimi • Alfred Hitchcock • David Hoffman The information here is priceless. I hope you will use it and take the advice in it to heart. These are people who obviously know what they’re talking about. So without further delay, let’s get to our experts…
  3. 3. David Hoffman If you want to do documentaries, this is the man you want to learn from. Hoffman has over 40 years experience making documentaries. Here are some of his most helpful tips. 1. Eliminate what doesn't enhance the story and exagerate what does. The way Hoffman explains this is simple. When doing a piece on history, the real truth is that a lot of the details are boring. The reason that a good historical piece is so exciting is that the creator focuses on the details that are exciting and interesting and leave out the mundane stuff. Watch any movie ever made on a historical event and you’ll see what I mean. It’s almost as if they take the entire section of history and condense it down to one or two main points…leaving out all the stuff that will put you to sleep. In other words, if it’s not absolutely critical to the story, leave it out. 2. Recognize your strengths and weaknesses. This is excellent advice. The way Hoffman explains it, not everybody is good at every little thing. Some people are good at writing, some at directing. If you can’t write, don’t try. Get somebody who is a good writer if your strength is in directing. By putting together a team of experts, you end up with the best movie possible. 3. Don't over criticize yourself. This is a common mistake that many beginning film makers make. They nit pick about every little thing that they do. Hoffman says you need to just jump into the fire and do it. Go with your gut. Some things will work and some won’t. But don’t censor yourself during the process too much. Let the ideas just come and have confidence in what you’re doing.
  4. 4. 4. It's okay to be nervous. Be nervous. I love the way Hoffman explains this. He says that when people tell you there is nothing to be nervous about, they’re wrong. There is a lot to be nervous about. Why? Because what you do matters. And it’s going to matter to somebody who is watching your movie 50 years from now. 5. Casting your crew is as important as who is in front of the camera. This is related to what he said about knowing your strengths and weaknesses. Movies are not just made by a director. They are made by actors, lighting men and an assortment of people. It is important to realize that your movie is only as strong as your weakest link. 6. Tell YOUR Truth. This was probably the best part of the interview and I’ll try to condense it as best as I can. Hoffman made a movie about slums. He could have portrayed the person living in the slums as a hero, going to work at a minimum wage job to support her 4 children. That would have been a truth. But it wasn’t his truth. Hoffman decided to focus instead on how the person didn’t keep the house clean, hit the children, and so on…focusing on all the negative aspects. After all, they were just as true. Point he’s making is this. If you’re doing a documentary, you don’t have to include all the facts just because they are true. You can focus on JUST the facts that tell the truth that you want to convey. Interesting way of looking at a documentary.
  5. 5. Some Final Words Naturally, the film makers mentioned in this report are the best of the best. But they didn’t get there overnight. Nobody, not even Hitchcock, was born with these smarts. They had to develop them just like everybody else. Below, you will find a great resource that, while it might not make you the next Hitchcock overnight, will certainly give you the kind of foundation you need to develop into a truly great film maker someday. Here is the site so you can check it out. NO BUDGET FILM MAKING Making films is one of the most enjoyable things you can do with your life. With the right training, some elbow grease and a little inspiration, you could be the next Spielberg, Tarantino, or even Hitchcock. Hey…anything is possible if you believe. To YOUR Success, Kirby Dillard Movietraining.net

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