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Proceedings of the
3rd
Corfu Symposium on
Managing & Marketing
Places
18th
- 21st
April 2016
Corfu Mare Bouti...
3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places
18th – 21st April 2016
18
Day 3 – Wednesday 20th
April
10:00 – 11:00 Se...
3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places
18th – 21st April 2016
76
Session 6
Place and Heritage
3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places
18th – 21st April 2016
81
Conceptualising the Value of Mixed Reality fo...
3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places
18th – 21st April 2016
82
In 2011, Pine and Korn proposed the realms of...
3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places
18th – 21st April 2016
83
Fig.1. The Multiverse (Pine and Korn, 2011)
G...
3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places
18th – 21st April 2016
84
References
Cranmer, E., Jung, T., tom Dieck, ...
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Pine & Korn Infinite Possibility Reference

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Pine & Korn Infinite Possibility Reference

  1. 1. sponsored by Proceedings of the 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places 18th - 21st April 2016 Corfu Mare Boutique Hotel Corfu, Greece
  2. 2. 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places 18th – 21st April 2016 18 Day 3 – Wednesday 20th April 10:00 – 11:00 Session 6: Facilitator – Dr Heather Skinner Place and heritage Thinking and Re-thinking about Places: Dark Heritage Sites Audrey Gilmore Ulster University, N. Ireland Roxana Magee Ulster University, N. Ireland Andrea Reid Ulster University, N. Ireland Lisa Harkness Ulster University, N. Ireland Conceptualising the Value of Mixed Reality for Enhancing Visitor Experience at Heritage Places Timothy Jung Manchester Metropolitan University, UK Mandy Claudia tom Dieck Manchester Metropolitan University, UK 11:00 – 11:30 Coffee 11:30 – 13:00 Session 7: Facilitator – Professor Cathy Parker Special Session - Writing for Publication: linking academics and practitioners: Introduction to the Institute of Place Management, and the Journal of Place Management and Development 13:00 – 14:30 Lunch 14:30 – 17:30 Coach departs from the Symposium Hotel for our visit to the Ropa Valley where we will visit Mavromatis Distillery and the Theotoky Estate. 17:30 Coach departs Theotoky Estate for our return to the Symposium Hotel. 19:00 Trip to Corfu Town - Delegates may take up the opportunity of joining us in Corfu town where we will take an evening guided walk around this historic UNESCO World Heritage Centre (dinner is not included but there are plenty of cafes, tavernas and restaurants in the town).
  3. 3. 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places 18th – 21st April 2016 76 Session 6 Place and Heritage
  4. 4. 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places 18th – 21st April 2016 81 Conceptualising the Value of Mixed Reality for Enhancing Visitor Experience at Heritage Places Dr Timothy Jung and Dr M. Claudia tom Dieck Manchester Metropolitan University Corresponding author:t.jung@mmu.ac.uk Pine and Korn (2011, p. 1) are on the forefront identifying opportunities of mixed realities, combination of augmented reality and virtual reality, for consumers’ value enhancement and revealed eight realms in the Multiverse including “reality, augmented reality, alternate reality, warped reality, virtuality, augmented virtuality, physical virtuality, and mirrored virtuality”. In each of these realms, consumers receive value from some type of technology that enhances their lives and thus businesses and places need to reach through these realms in order to identify new opportunities of adding more value to consumers. In the visitor experience context, mixed realities are changing the way tourists experience environments when visiting places. Augmented reality has previously been proven to enhance experiences through the overlay of digital information into visitors’ immediate surroundings (Han et al., 2014; Jung et al., 2015; tom Dieck et al., 2015) whilst virtual reality was found to provide tourists and visitors with rich information and experience with a focus on trip planning before visiting destinations (Huang et al., 2015). However, a focus on the experience of mixed realities while visiting places is scarce (Jung et al., 2016). Particularly in the context of heritage places such as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Cranmer et al. (2016) found latest technologies enable an enhancement of the visitor experience through interactive, informative and enjoyable information without interfering with nature and traditional landscapes. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to conceptualise how a heritage place such as UNESCO World Heritage Site can add value to the visitor experience through the inclusion of mixed realities.
  5. 5. 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places 18th – 21st April 2016 82 In 2011, Pine and Korn proposed the realms of multiverse (Figure 1), a model which proposed that experiences occur around space, time and matter axes. Each of the eight realms of the model has its roots in reality which is positioned in the real place at the actual time and matter. The present study focuses on augmented reality, which is according to Pine and Korn (2011), moves a bit further ahead to the no matter spectrum due to the provision of digital information at the actual time of experience within a real space as well as virtual reality which moves a bit further and provides visitors and consumers with experiences in a virtual space in a more autonomous time. According to Stone (2015), there has been a wide range of studies describing the potential contributions of new and innovative interactive digital technologies to the preservation, understanding and interpretation of sites, artefacts and events over the past decade. In this paper, it is proposed that in the case of UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the model of the realms in the multiverse can be applied to stage augmented and virtual experiences while visiting the real heritage places in order to enhance visitor experiences. In particular, non-accessible sites can be made accessible through the staging of a virtual experience. This is proposed to add value to the heritage places through an enhanced service offering providing enhanced information without compromising on original places (tom Dieck & Jung, 2016) as well as visitors experience and perceived value (Cranmer et al., 2016). In particular, augmented reality as a tool can be used to provide digital (no-matter) content on heritage places and natural objects (matter) in real-time and real places. On the other hand, virtual reality can provide a digital experience in real-time or in autonomous time on real space using a virtual space. Hence, heritage places are enabled to utilise the full spectrum displayed in Figure 1 to provide their visitors with an enhanced experience of their place. In this short paper, the case of Geevor Tin Mine museum, a UNESCO World Heritage recognised site, is used as an example to show how the realms of multiverse can be used to enhance the visitor experience with a specific focus on reality, augmented reality and virtual reality and how these three interlink. Geevor Tin Mine museum is located in Cornwall, UK, and has a broad target market from school groups to senior visitors. Consequently, the need for the creation of enjoyable and interactive as well as accessible content is one of the priorities in terms of visitor experience.
  6. 6. 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places 18th – 21st April 2016 83 Fig.1. The Multiverse (Pine and Korn, 2011) Geevor Tin Mine museum as a place spreads over a large natural area directly at the ocean and the experience include the exploration of old machinery and mines. However, due to the World Heritage Status, information signs are limited for preservation purposes. Augmented reality provides an ideal tool to provide enjoyable, informative and interactive information overlaid into visitors’ direct vision without compromising on the museum and its natural surroundings while adding to the value creation process. Virtual reality can be used to help explore non-accessible sites such as mines as well as enable young children, senior visitors or disabled visitors to explore the underground mines which otherwise would be hidden. Overall, the use of mixed realities while visiting heritage places can help to overcome accessibility issues, preserve natural places as well as enhance the visitor experience allowing for a fuller and more immersive way of visiting places. The present study proposed how mixed reality could add value to enhance the experience at heritage places. Implementing a mix of digital technologies is expected to create value for visitors and therefore, future research and case studies are required to develop mixed (augmented and virtual) reality applications to test the enhancement of the visitor experience. No-Time (Autonomous) Autonomous Events No-Matter (Bits) Digital Substances No-Space (Virtual) Virtual Places Time (Actual) Actual Events Matter (Atoms) Material Substances Space (Real) Real Places
  7. 7. 3rd Corfu Symposium on Managing & Marketing Places 18th – 21st April 2016 84 References Cranmer, E., Jung, T., tom Dieck, M.C., & Miller, A. (2016). Understanding the Acceptance of Augmented Reality at an Organisational level: The Case of Geevor Tin Mine Museum, In Information and Communication Technologies in Tourism, Springer: Heidelberg. Han, D. I., Jung, T., & Gibson, A. (2013). Dublin AR: Implementing Augmented Reality in Tourism. In Information and Communication Technologies in Tourism 2014 (pp. 511- 523). Springer International Publishing. Huang, Y.C., Backman, K. F., Backman, S. J., & Chang, L. L. (2015). Exploring the Implications of Virtual Reality Technology in Tourism Marketing: An Integrated Research Framework. International Journal of Tourism Research. Jung, T., Chung, N., & Leue, M. C. (2015). The determinants of recommendations to use augmented reality technologies: The case of a Korean theme park. Tourism Management, 49, 75-86. Jung, T., tom Dieck, M.C., Lee, H., & Chung, N. (2016). Effects of Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality on Visitor Experiences in Museum, In Information and Communication Technologies in Tourism, Springer: Heidelberg. Pine, J., & Korn, K. (2011). Infinite Possibility: Creating Customer Value on the Digital Frontier, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, San Francisco. Stone, R. (2015). Virtual and Augmented Reality Technologies for Applications in Cultural Heritage: A Human Factors Perspective. Furnace, 2, 1-18. tom Dieck, M. C., & Jung, T. (2015). A theoretical model of mobile augmented reality acceptance in urban heritage tourism. Current Issues in Tourism, 1-21. tom Dieck, M. C., & Jung, T. (2016). Value of Augmented Reality to enhance the Visitor Experience: A Case study of Manchester Jewish Museum, eReview of Tourism Research, 1-5.

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