Nanaimo PQT Session 2

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Nanaimo PQT Session 2

  1. 1. NDTA Teacher Inquiry Session 2 December 7, 2009 A Joint Project Funded by Nanaimo School District and the BCTF Program for Quality Teaching (PQT) Facilitated by Debra Swain and Laurie Gitzel BCTF PQT Program Facilitators
  2. 2. Inquiry Professional Conversations
  3. 3. <ul><li>-To ask deliberate questions about teaching and learning. </li></ul><ul><li>-To formulate a clear topic/problem to investigate. </li></ul><ul><li>-To engage in professional conversations that reflect on learning and teaching practice. </li></ul><ul><li>-To apply our professional learning to individual teaching situations. </li></ul><ul><li>-To make inquiry a social learning experience and a collaborative enterprise. </li></ul><ul><li>-To honour expertise. </li></ul>Learning Intentions
  4. 4. Group Guidelines <ul><li> November 23, 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Check-in to understand how people are doing and where they are at </li></ul><ul><li>A cknowledge that we are at different stage </li></ul><ul><li>Be respectful of our different learning styles </li></ul><ul><li>Be gentle with each other </li></ul><ul><li>Be mindful of confidentiality and the code of ethics </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage clarification and be comfortable asking for it </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage participation and learning partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Provide constructive criticism </li></ul><ul><li>Be mindful of side bar conversations </li></ul><ul><li>Bring student voices into the conversations </li></ul><ul><li>Share real life classroom experiences, books, articles and other resources </li></ul><ul><li>Be prepared for each session and take responsibility for your own learning </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate with each other in the space between sessions. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>What is your question? </li></ul><ul><li>What are your plans to investigate the question? </li></ul><ul><li>What help or support do you need? </li></ul>Journal Reflection
  6. 6. Six Session Overview 1. Nov. 23, 2009. Build community and ask an inquiry question 2. Dec. 7, 2009. Create a plan of action and consider methods of data collection 3. Jan. 25, 2010. Analyze data and consider whether further data collection is necessary 4. March 1, 2010. Further data analysis and plans for future action 5. May 3, 2010. Prepare for presentation of learning 6. June 7, 2010. Final celebration of learning
  7. 7. EXIT slips and feedback Thank you for your constructive feedback. November 23, 2009
  8. 8. Teacher Inquiry in the BCTF: 1. Program for Quality Teaching (PQT) 2. Research and Technology (RT)
  9. 9. Types of Teacher Inquiry - Action Research -Professional Conversations -Book Study Groups Subject/Theme Based Groups -Appreciative Inquiry
  10. 10. Action Research 5 Phases <ul><li>Problem Identification (ask a question) </li></ul><ul><li>Plan of Action </li></ul><ul><li>Data Collection </li></ul><ul><li>Data Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Plan for future action </li></ul>
  11. 11. Professional Conversations “A group of peers engaging in sustained and focused conversations about practice” (Teacher Inquiry in the BCTF: A focus for supporting teacher’s professional development, A report to the BCTF Executive Committee from the Teacher Inquiry Group, April 2008)
  12. 12. Crafting the Container for Professional Conversations <ul><li>STRATEGIES FOR CONVERSATION STARTERS </li></ul><ul><li>PROTOCOLS FOR STRUCTURING CONVERSATION: HELPING TRIOS, CASE STUDIES, TUNING PROTOCOL, CIRCLE DIALOGUE </li></ul><ul><li>VERBAL/NONVERBAL TOOLS FOR SUSTAINING THE CONVERSATION </li></ul><ul><li>(WELLMAN AND LIPTON (2004) </li></ul>
  13. 13. Post-It Reflection on Lorna Earl’s Article Use a PMI frame to reflect on the article: Positive -recent publication -provides examples applicable to the classroom Minus Intriguing
  14. 14. Honing the Inquiry “ Inquiry is a self directed search for understanding. The essence of inquiry lies in formulating good questions and using research to come to a better understanding of those questions.” Bob Hudspith and Herb Jenkins: Teaching the Art of Inquiry, 2001
  15. 15. Listening Triads Purpose: To reflect on the inquiry question or plan of action. Structuring Protocol: 10 minutes/person A: Talks about the Teacher Inquiry for 5 minutes B: Probes, clarifies, paraphrases, asks questions, to gain a greater understanding of the inquiry (3 minutes) C: Observes the conversation and shares information during a debrief (2 minutes)
  16. 16. A: Discusses the Teacher Inquiry for 5 minutes. * Reflect on your question/plan with a critical eye. *Stretch your thinking…dig deep and challenge what you know.
  17. 17. B: Probes, clarifies, paraphrases, asks questions , to help the Teacher Inquirer (Person A) extend his/her thinking in order to and gain a greater understanding of the inquiry question or process. (3 minutes)
  18. 18. C: Observes the 8 minute conversation and articulates the important aspects of the discussion in a 2 minute debrief. This process deepens the participants understanding of the Inquiry.
  19. 19. Ethical Guidelines <ul><li>School Board Policies </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom based Inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>-Sharing/publishing information re: students outside of the school </li></ul><ul><li>-Letter written by Journey Middle School’s Principal </li></ul>
  20. 20. Some Data Collection Examples * Photographs * Interviews * Journal Entries, Observations * Surveys * Student work samples * Structured Conversations: Circle Dialogue, Tuning Protocol
  21. 21. 1,2,3…on Data Collection Methods <ul><li>Method that caught your eye or that </li></ul><ul><li>you have used before </li></ul><ul><li>2. New methods you would like to try </li></ul><ul><li>3. Methods that are best suited to your </li></ul><ul><li>inquiry </li></ul>
  22. 22. Triangulation Student Interviews Portfolios Tuning Protocol
  23. 23. Laurie’s Inquiry
  24. 24. Participant Sample <ul><li>Divide class list into thirds and separate into </li></ul><ul><li>individual names </li></ul><ul><li>-Place three groupings of names and into </li></ul><ul><li>three hats </li></ul><ul><li>Select 2 students from each hat </li></ul><ul><li>-Gather data on six students </li></ul>
  25. 25. <ul><li>Action Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Grade: 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Subject: Science </li></ul><ul><li>Timeline: December to February </li></ul><ul><li>Intervention: To implement processes that will help students: </li></ul><ul><li>self-assess and guide their learning by comparing their work to the learning outcome standards/exemplars </li></ul><ul><li>b) identify gaps in their understanding </li></ul><ul><li>c) take the necessary steps to either adapt, change or improve their skills, understanding and knowledge </li></ul>
  26. 26. Homework 1. Complete action plan and e-mail to Deb or Laurie by December 18, 2009. 2. Begin the Inquiry using a two lens approach: a) Instructional Lens: Collect data/information on implementation of the classroom based interventions. b) Student Learning Lens: Collect data/information on how the teaching intervention is impacting students’ learning .
  27. 27. EXIT Slip <ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul>
  28. 28. “ For students to be able to improve, they must develop the capacity to monitor the quality of their own work during actual production. This in turn requires that students possess an appreciation of what high quality work is, that they have the evaluative skill necessary for them to compare with some objectivity the quality of what they are producing in relation to the higher standard, and that they develop a store of tactics or moves which can be drawn on to modify their own work .” Sadler, 1989 as cited by Earl, Rethinking Classroom Assessment With Purpose in Mind, 2006

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