The Music Industry

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The Music Industry

  1. 1. Audiences& Institutions<br />Exam: Section B<br />
  2. 2. You need to develop<br />a case study about an<br />independent record label<br />
  3. 3. Your record label must<br />produce and/or <br />distribute in the UK<br />
  4. 4. You need to learn about how your label (institution) relates to:<br />Production<br />
  5. 5. You need to learn about how your label (institution) relates to:<br />Production<br />(recording music)<br />
  6. 6. You need to learn about how your label (institution) relates to:<br />Distribution<br />
  7. 7. You need to learn about how your label (institution) relates to:<br />Distribution<br />(Promotion and selling of music)<br />
  8. 8. You need to learn about how your label (institution) relates to:<br />Consumption<br />
  9. 9. You need to learn about how your label (institution) relates to:<br />Consumption<br />(by the audience & customers)<br />
  10. 10. You need to learn about how your label (institution) relates to:<br /><ul><li> Production
  11. 11. Distribution
  12. 12. Consumption</li></li></ul><li>Production<br />Distribution<br />Audience<br />
  13. 13. Distribution Audience<br />
  14. 14. Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail</li></li></ul><li>Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail
  15. 15. download sales</li></li></ul><li>Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail
  16. 16. download sales (legal)</li></li></ul><li>Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail
  17. 17. download sales (legal)
  18. 18. peer to peer</li></li></ul><li>Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail
  19. 19. download sales (legal)
  20. 20. peer to peer (illegal)</li></li></ul><li>Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail
  21. 21. download sales (legal)
  22. 22. peer to peer (illegal)
  23. 23. concerts</li></li></ul><li>Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail
  24. 24. download sales (legal)
  25. 25. peer to peer (illegal)
  26. 26. concerts
  27. 27. merchandise</li></li></ul><li>Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail
  28. 28. download sales (legal)
  29. 29. peer to peer (illegal)
  30. 30. concerts
  31. 31. merchandise</li></li></ul><li>Distribution Audience<br /><ul><li> high street retail
  32. 32. download sales (legal)
  33. 33. peer to peer (illegal)
  34. 34. concerts
  35. 35. merchandise</li></ul>CONSUMPTION<br />
  36. 36.
  37. 37. The BIG FOUR record labels<br />
  38. 38. The BIG FOUR record labels<br /><ul><li>Sony/BMG</li></li></ul><li>The BIG FOUR record labels<br /><ul><li>Sony/BMG
  39. 39. Warner Brothers</li></li></ul><li>The BIG FOUR record labels<br /><ul><li>Sony/BMG
  40. 40. Warner Brothers
  41. 41. Universal</li></li></ul><li>The BIG FOUR record labels<br /><ul><li>Sony/BMG
  42. 42. Warner Brothers
  43. 43. Universal
  44. 44. EMI</li></li></ul><li>The BIG FOUR record labels<br />Long establish, huge corporate organisations that can pour large sums of money into promoting and distributing products by their successful artists….<br />
  45. 45. The BIG FOUR record labels<br />Long establish, huge corporate organisations that can pour large sums of money into promoting and distributing porducts by their successful artists….<br />But they are not so keen to spend money on smaller, less profitable bands who have only a specialist, niche market.<br />
  46. 46. The BIG FOUR<br />Long establish, huge corporate organisations that can pour large sums of money into promoting and distributing products by their successful artists….<br />But they are not so keen to spend money on smaller, less profitable bands who have only a specialist, niche market.<br />80% of the market<br />
  47. 47. 20% of the market:<br />
  48. 48. 20% of the market:<br />Smaller independent labels <br />catering for niche markets<br />
  49. 49. Independent record production and <br />distribution made possible by:<br /><ul><li>digital technology</li></li></ul><li>Independent record production and <br />distribution made possible by:<br /><ul><li>digital technology
  50. 50. the development of the internet</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br />
  51. 51. Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  52. 52. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  53. 53. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  54. 54. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  55. 55. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  56. 56. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  57. 57. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  58. 58. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  59. 59. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  60. 60. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced
  61. 61. 1997 MP3s (digital files) introduced</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  62. 62. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  63. 63. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  64. 64. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced
  65. 65. 1997 MP3s (digital files) introduced
  66. 66. 1999 Napster – the first (illegal) peer to peer service</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  67. 67. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  68. 68. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  69. 69. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced
  70. 70. 1997 MP3s (digital files) introduced
  71. 71. 1999 Napster – the first (illegal) peer to peer service
  72. 72. 2000 Broadband (faster internet) into UK</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  73. 73. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  74. 74. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  75. 75. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced
  76. 76. 1997 MP3s (digital files) introduced
  77. 77. 1999 Napster – the first (illegal) peer to peer service
  78. 78. 2000 Broadband (faster internet) into UK
  79. 79. 2001 Apple iPod and iTunes</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  80. 80. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  81. 81. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  82. 82. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced
  83. 83. 1997 MP3s (digital files) introduced
  84. 84. 1999 Napster – the first (illegal) peer to peer service
  85. 85. 2000 Broadband (faster internet) into UK
  86. 86. 2001 Apple iPod and iTunes
  87. 87. 2003 CD sales drop by 33%</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  88. 88. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  89. 89. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  90. 90. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced
  91. 91. 1997 MP3s (digital files) introduced
  92. 92. 1999 Napster – the first (illegal) peer to peer service
  93. 93. 2000 Broadband (faster internet) into UK
  94. 94. 2001 Apple iPod and iTunes
  95. 95. 2003 CD sales drop by 33%
  96. 96. 2005 iPod shuffle and iPod sales 3.5 million a month</li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  97. 97. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  98. 98. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  99. 99. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced
  100. 100. 1997 MP3s (digital files) introduced
  101. 101. 1999 Napster – the first (illegal) peer to peer service
  102. 102. 2000 Broadband (faster internet) into UK
  103. 103. 2001 Apple iPod and iTunes
  104. 104. 2003 CD sales drop by 33%
  105. 105. 2005 iPod shuffle and iPod sales 3.5 million a month
  106. 106. 2010 “High Street” music stores dying out </li></li></ul><li>Technological development<br /><ul><li>1980 Compact Discs introduced
  107. 107. 1982 CDs playable on PCs (initial convergence)
  108. 108. 1986 CD sales > vinyl records
  109. 109. 1990 Recordable CDs introduced
  110. 110. 1997 MP3s (digital files) introduced
  111. 111. 1999 Napster – the first (illegal) peer to peer service
  112. 112. 2000 Broadband (faster internet) into UK
  113. 113. 2001 Apple iPod and iTunes
  114. 114. 2003 CD sales drop by 33%
  115. 115. 2005 iPod shuffle and iPod sales 3.5 million a month
  116. 116. 2010 “High Street” music stores dying out </li></li></ul><li>You need to discover<br />how your chosen record<br />label has grown and<br />developed because of this<br />
  117. 117. Establish some facts and<br />figures, then memorise<br />and contextualise them<br />
  118. 118. What does your label think about illegal peer topeer downloading?<br />
  119. 119. How does your label<br />produce, market and<br />distribute it’s products?<br />
  120. 120. Does your label, and its<br />artists make full use of<br />social network sites?<br />
  121. 121. Does your label, and its<br />artists make full use of<br />social network sites?<br />(WEB 2.0)<br />
  122. 122. Use as many real lifeexamples as you can<br />to support your findings.<br />
  123. 123. Don’t forget the importance<br />of …<br />
  124. 124. Don’t forget the importance<br />of …<br />convergingtechnologies<br />
  125. 125. Convergence<br />

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