New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell
looks at why major changes in our
society so often happen suddenly and
unexpectedly. Id...
Which is more dangerous, a gun or a
swimming pool? What do
schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers
have in common? Why do drug d...
Greg Mortenson, was a homeless
mountaineer who, following a 1993 climb of
Pakistan’s treacherous K2, was inspired by a
cha...
For two decades, Jeannette Walls hid her
roots. Now she tells her own story.
Hers is a story of triumph against all
odds, ...
Jon Ronson's exploration takes him,
unexpectedly, into the heart of the madness
industry. An influential psychologist who ...
Blink is a book about how we think
without thinking, about choices that seem
to be made in an instant--in the blink of
an ...
Non fiction
Non fiction
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Non fiction

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Non fiction

  1. 1. New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell looks at why major changes in our society so often happen suddenly and unexpectedly. Ideas, behavior, messages, and products, he argues, often spread like outbreaks of infectious disease. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a few fare-beaters and graffiti artists fuel a subway crime wave, or a satisfied customer fill the empty tables of a new restaurant. These are social epidemics, and the moment when they take off, when they reach their critical mass, is the Tipping Point.
  2. 2. Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? How much do parents really matter? How did the legalization of abortion affect the rate of violent crime? These may not sound like typical questions for an economist to ask. But Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He studies the riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to sports and child-rearing—and turns conventional wisdom on its head.
  3. 3. Greg Mortenson, was a homeless mountaineer who, following a 1993 climb of Pakistan’s treacherous K2, was inspired by a chance encounter with impoverished mountain villagers and promised to build them a school. Over the next decade he built fifty-five schools—especially for girls—that offer a balanced education in one of the most isolated and dangerous regions on earth. It chronicles Mortenson’s quest, which has brought him into conflict with both enraged Islamists and uncomprehending Americans.
  4. 4. For two decades, Jeannette Walls hid her roots. Now she tells her own story. Hers is a story of triumph against all odds, but also a tender, moving tale of unconditional love in a family that despite its profound flaws gave her the fiery determination to carve out a successful life on her own terms.
  5. 5. Jon Ronson's exploration takes him, unexpectedly, into the heart of the madness industry. An influential psychologist who is convinced that many important CEOs and politicians are, in fact, psychopaths teaches Ronson how to spot these high-flying individuals by looking out for little telltale verbal and nonverbal clues. Armed with his new psychopath-spotting abilities, Ronson spends time with a deathsquad leader institutionalized for mortgage fraud in Coxsackie, New York; a legendary CEO whose psychopathy has been speculated about in the press; and a patient in an asylum for the criminally insane who insists he's sane and not a psychopath.
  6. 6. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are not? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? How do our brains really work--in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, etc.? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?

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