SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN
THE DESIGN SCHOOL
FOUNDATION IN NATURAL BUILD ENVIRONMENT

NAME: KIMBERLEY EE ...
Prewriting
smooth
paint
texture

rough
wood
smooth
lead

touch

made by the
maufacturer
etched
words

teeth
marks

each le...
The Pencil
The pencil lying on my desk, I realise, is not just a pencil at all. I find it impossible to
remember if there ...
to reveal the underlying wood. Finally, at the very end of the pencil, the texture is smooth once
more as the lead has bee...
Moving on, it is time I describe my pencil through sound. This may seem strange to some but
for this part of my descriptio...
Drawing of my pencil
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The pencil

698 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
698
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
31
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The pencil

  1. 1. SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING AND DESIGN THE DESIGN SCHOOL FOUNDATION IN NATURAL BUILD ENVIRONMENT NAME: KIMBERLEY EE SZE ANN STUDENT ID NO: 0315319 TOOL SELECTED: PENCIL WORD COUNT: 1057 ENGLISH 2 (ENGL 0205) WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT 1: DESCRIPTIVE ESSAY LECTURER: CASSANDRA WIJESURIA SUBMISSION DATE: 14TH NOVEMBER 2013
  2. 2. Prewriting smooth paint texture rough wood smooth lead touch made by the maufacturer etched words teeth marks each letter etched in the same way personal mark reveal a bad habit painted green colour The pencil pale brown wood exposed shiny black lead cylindrical sight shape pencil's ID cry sound whisper shout tapers to a point gold letters and numbers cries when dropped whispers when writing shouts in pain when broken
  3. 3. The Pencil The pencil lying on my desk, I realise, is not just a pencil at all. I find it impossible to remember if there was a day since I started my course in architecture that I haven’t had a pencil at hand. Do not get me wrong though, the pencil in question is certainly not the high-tech mechanical pencil with plastic body and steel springs that had been steady companion throughout most of my school life. No, the pencil I am addressing is none other than the old fashioned wood cased pencil complete with graphite core. Strange isn’t it that this pencil would become such a dominant feature in my life. I remember it as if only yesterday; I was halfway through my first year in kindergarten, when I spotted one of my classmates using a mechanical pencil which was at that time a breakthrough in stationary technology. As you can imagine, I was eager to possess this wondrous item and only too eager to banish the mundane wood cased pencil from my life. Now however, I have reconstructed old bridges between my little friend and me. Subsequently, I will continue to fondly describe my wood cased pencil in the following paragraphs through touch, sight and sound. Firstly, I will explore my pencil through touch. Although, it must have taken me quite a while to write my first paragraph my pencil still lays silently on my desk, still and unmoving as pencils often are. Possibly this is one of the most interesting characteristics of a pencil: they are capable of so much yet require the human touch to unleash their potential. Guided by the human hand a pencil may write, draw, sketch or even shade. Even now, as I lift my pencil my fingers automatically take shape around it as if I were to start writing, the familiar act drilled into me since childhood. However, that is not my intention and I merely run my fingers across the familiar surface. As I do so, I realise a subtle change in texture, the body is painted and smooth to the touch, nearer to the end the texture becomes rough where the paint has been shaven away
  4. 4. to reveal the underlying wood. Finally, at the very end of the pencil, the texture is smooth once more as the lead has been exposed and sharpened to a point. Still, that is not all I feel as I examine the familiar object. Near the middle of the pencil, words have been etched by the manufacturer into the fine wood. Each letter is engraved in the same way such that they only penetrate a millimetre into the surface. At, the end opposite the lead point my fingers flit across small craters where my teeth have dented and marred the once perfect paint surface, a signature of my own that reveals a none too pleasant habit. Next, I bring my pencil closer to my face, turning it in my hands as I begin to observe it through sight. The pencil is painted dark green in colour, though my vast knowledge of stationary can testify that pencils come in many different colours and varieties. Another noticeable feature is that it is cylindrical in shape and tapers to a point at one end. At this end, the paint has been shaven off to reveal the pale brown wood underneath and later the shiny black lead point at the very end. Furthermore, the pencil is covered in shiny gold lettering that has been engraved then painted onto the wood. These letters are the pencils ID. Printed entirely in capital letters and numbers, they tell the story of the pencils birth. That is, the company that manufactured it, the barcode and finally at the very top of the pencil is the letter ‘B’. This letter indicates the grade of the pencil. There are many different grades such as B, HB and H. The B stands for brittle and the H for hard. The more brittle the pencil, the more graphite it contains and the harder the pencil, the more clay it contains. This can affect the line weights produced by a pencil and are especially important to architects and engineers.
  5. 5. Moving on, it is time I describe my pencil through sound. This may seem strange to some but for this part of my description it is important that you adopt an open mind. Let me begin to demonstrate to you how my pencil speaks to me through sound. Right now, my pencil still remains held in my hand. However, as I slowly release my fingers, the pencil clatters onto the hard marble tiles. This sound is the sound that my pencil makes when it is in pain; it is the cry of an inanimate object. Furthermore, my pencil not only cries but whispers when I write or draw on a sheet of paper. I reach across my desk and produce a sheet of art paper. The texture is slightly rough and when I move my pencil across the paper it produces scratching sounds similar to whispers. Lastly, I take my pencil in both hands and grip it tightly at both ends. For a minute, I regret what I am about to do but the next second the sound of wood breaking and splintering fills the room. This sound is the sound a pencil makes when it shouts out in pain. Yes, to some this may seem like simple personification but these sounds are unique to the pencil in many ways as the sounds the pencil produces are due to the different materials it is made of. In conclusion, although it was difficult at first for me to analyse my chosen object through touch, sight and sound, I found that it was good experience for me as it pushed me to translate what I felt, saw and heard into words. Sometimes, it can be difficult to begin writing and for me writing this essay was no exception. However, when I placed the object on my desk and began to explore it through all five senses, it was not long before the words began to flow through me. Although in the end I chose only to describe three senses in this essay, I feel that I have been able to successfully convey my understanding of the humble wood cased pencil.
  6. 6. Drawing of my pencil

×