A New Mayor for Charlotte...Again

207 views

Published on

Charlotte has a new mayor - Dan Clodfelter. Here's a great civic learning opportunity.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
207
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

A New Mayor for Charlotte...Again

  1. 1. A New Mayor for Charlotte  (again)      GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org   1  Charlotte’s new mayor, Dan Clodfelter, was sworn in on April 9, 2014.     This  learning  opportunity  helps  students  learn  about  a  variety  of  topics,  and  aligns  with  Common Core and social studies standards.    Local government  Role of Mayor of Charlotte  Civic leadership  Current events and public policy issues  Economy, jobs, and connections between business and government  Media literacy  Reading and analyzing information  Writing to communicate information, ideas, facts and opinions  Communicating a position to set the tone, address issues, and be persuasive  And more!      Read and watch the Oath of Office Speech    Visit http://generationnation.org/index.php/learn/entry/a‐new‐mayor‐for‐charlotte‐again  For updated links to videos, news coverage, speech, and more. 
  2. 2. A New Mayor for Charlotte  (again)      GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org   2   Predict, watch, read and analyze     First, think about the city and mayor, and predict which topics the speech will cover. Then read  or watch the speech.    Make notes and think about what you see –which topics are being covered? Any surprises?  What did you learn? Use the scorecard to keep track, and discuss at home or in the classroom.    Download activity: www.GenerationNation.org/documents/speech_analysis.pdf       Write the headline    After you watch and/or read the speech, think about the media coverage. Pay attention, and  answer these questions. Write your answers or share in groups or with your class or with your  family.   If you were reporting on the Inauguration, what would your headline be?   The next day, read actual headlines. Were you close? Were they right? Why or why not?   Read headlines from different news sources. What do they say? How are they similar or  different? Why?     Download activity: www.GenerationNation.org/documents/Write_headline_mayor.pdf     Write your own speech    A mayor provides a vision and direction for the city.  Usually, the speech focuses on “big  picture” goals rather than detailed specifics. It is also a good leadership tool that can help to  communicate key messages as well as motivate and unify leaders and citizens.    As a speechwriter, what do you think the Mayor should say in the speech? Write your own.  Or partner with a speechwriting team in your class to create a new speech using quotes  from addresses delivered by current or historic leaders, or come up with your own.     Getting the message across    Watch the speech (or interviews). Write your answers or share in groups and discuss with your  class or family.   What is the key message the Mayor is trying to deliver? 
  3. 3. A New Mayor for Charlotte  (again)      GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org   3  How does he communicate the information?   Does the he read from a piece of paper?   Does he raise or lower his voice or move his hands to illustrate a specific point?   Does he show emotions and expressions? How? Why? When?   Does he look confident? Is he?  How is he dressed? Does this matter?   Is he persuasive? How?   What do you think is the most effective thing the Mayor does to communicate the  information? Least effective?   If you were the Mayor’s advisor, what would you tell him to keep doing? Improve?    Download activity:  www.GenerationNation.org/documents/GETTING_MSG_ACROSS_mayor.pdf     A Presidential Comparison    In every level of government, leaders make speeches. Watch or reach an inaugural speech from  the current or a historic president. Compare it with the Mayor’s speech. What is the same?  What is different? Why?     Watch Swearing‐In videos www.inaugural.senate.gov/swearing‐in/videos   Read text  http://www.inaugural.senate.gov/swearing‐in/addresses       Wish for America/My Community    The Oath of Office speech gives the Mayor the opportunity to share his vision for Charlotte and  outline how he will be a leader and problem‐solver over the next 2 years. Do you have an idea  for solving a civic problem? How would you make your school, neighborhood, or community a  better place? Make it happen!    Download activity: http://www.generationnation.org/documents/MyWish_andIdeas.pdf        
  4. 4. A New Mayor for Charlotte         Predict, watch, read and analyze     First, think about the city and mayor, and predict which topics the speech will cover. Then read  or watch the speech.    Make notes and think about what you see –which topics are being covered? Any surprises?  What did you learn? Use the scorecard to keep track, and discuss at home or in the classroom.    Download activity: www.GenerationNation.org/documents/speech_analysis.pdf       Write the headline    After you watch and/or read the speech, think about the media coverage. Pay attention, and  answer these questions. Write your answers or share in groups or with your class or with your  family.   If you were reporting on the Inauguration, what would your headline be?   The next day, read actual headlines. Were you close? Were they right? Why or why not?   Read headlines from different news sources. What do they say? How are they similar or  different? Why?     Download activity: www.GenerationNation.org/documents/Write_headline_mayor.pdf     Write your own speech    A mayor provides a vision and direction for the city.  Usually, the speech focuses on “big  picture” goals rather than detailed specifics. It is also a good leadership tool that can help to  communicate key messages as well as motivate and unify leaders and citizens.    As a speechwriter, what do you think the Mayor should say in the speech? Write your own.  Or partner with a speechwriting team in your class to create a new speech using quotes  from addresses delivered by current or historic leaders, or come up with your own.     Getting the message across    Watch the speech (or interviews). Write your answers or share in groups and discuss with your  class or family.   What is the key message the Mayor is trying to deliver?  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org   10 
  5. 5. A New Mayor for Charlotte         How does he communicate the information?   Does the he read from a piece of paper?   Does he raise or lower his voice or move his hands to illustrate a specific point?   Does he show emotions and expressions? How? Why? When?   Does he look confident? Is he?  How is he dressed? Does this matter?   Is he persuasive? How?   What do you think is the most effective thing the Mayor does to communicate the  information? Least effective?   If you were the Mayor’s advisor, what would you tell him to keep doing? Improve?    Download activity:  www.GenerationNation.org/documents/GETTING_MSG_ACROSS_mayor.pdf     A Presidential Comparison    In every level of government, leaders make speeches. Watch or reach an inaugural speech from  the current or a historic president. Compare it with the Mayor’s speech. What is the same?  What is different? Why?     Watch Swearing‐In videos www.inaugural.senate.gov/swearing‐in/videos   Read text  http://www.inaugural.senate.gov/swearing‐in/addresses       Wish for America/My Community    The Oath of Office speech gives the Mayor the opportunity to share his vision for Charlotte and  outline how he will be a leader and problem‐solver over the next 2 years. Do you have an idea  for solving a civic problem? How would you make your school, neighborhood, or community a  better place? Make it happen!    Download activity: http://www.generationnation.org/documents/MyWish_andIdeas.pdf         GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org   11 
  6. 6.   MAYOR’S SPEECH – PREDICT AND ANALYZE  Before you watch or reach the speech, make predictions about what you think will be covered.  Then, watch and analyze the actual peech.      PREDICTION  ANALYSIS  Theme for this  Mayor        Vision for Charlotte            Big ideas/goals            Mayor’s  strengths/challenges          City’s  strengths/challenges          Who is recognized,  thanked, etc.            Quotes from famous  leaders (who, what)            Current events  addressed                      GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org
  7. 7.   MAYOR’S SPEECH – PREDICT AND ANALYZE  Before you watch or reach the speech, make predictions about what you think will be covered.  Then, watch and analyze the actual peech.      PREDICTION  ANALYSIS  Main topics covered    Do you agree that the  topics are important?  Why/ why not?            Is speech effective?  Why or why not?              What did you learn?  What surprised you?  What did you hope  to see that you  didn’t?                  What will you  remember about  this speech?        Other comments,  notes and questions                   GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org
  8. 8.   WRITE THE HEADLINE    Read the mayor’s speech, or watch the video. Pay attention, and answer these questions. Write your answers to  share in groups or with your class or with your family.   If you were reporting on what the mayor said, what would your headline be?   The next day, read actual headlines. Were you close? Were they right? Why or why not?   Read headlines from different news sources. What do they say? How are they similar or different? Why?     SPEECH, ISSUE OR ACTIVITY AND DATE: ______________________________________  MEDIA SOURCE HEADLINE My Name:    My headline:  Charlotte Observer http://www.charlotteobserver.com     News 14 http://charlotte.news14.com/       WBTV http://www.wbtv.com       WCNC http://www.wcnc.com       WSOC http://www.wsoctv.com/       WFAE http://wfae.org/       WBT http://www.wbt.com/       (OTHER NEWS SOURCES)        GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  9. 9.   GETTING THE MESSAGE ACROSS      Watch the speech. Write your answers or share in groups, with your class or at home.   What is the key message the leader is trying to deliver?  How does the speaker communicate the information? Does the leader read from a piece of paper?   Does the leader’s voice change (raised or lowered) or hands moved to illustrate a specific point?   Does the speaker show emotions and expressions? How? Why? When?   Does the leader look confident? How?   How is the leader dressed? Does this matter?   Do people pay attention? How?   Is the leader persuasive? How?   What is the most effective thing the leader does to communicate the information? Least effective?   If you were helping the leader to strengthen the speech, what would your suggestions be?       Make copies for each leader, interview, or speech, and compare notes. Do the leaders change their delivery in  different speeches or interviews?  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  10. 10.   GETTING THE MESSAGE ACROSS      Date: Speech or interview: Leader          Key message      Communication skills    Confidence    Appearance    Do people pay attention    Is the person persuasive?    Most effective    Least effective              GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice

×