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2015-2016 Manual
130 COUNTRIES | 300,000 STUDENTS | 4,300 TEACHERS
Bring the world to your classroom!
CONTENTS
The School & Classroom Program
Manual is an information resource for
teachers published annually by People
to Peo...
PTPI views global competence as an essential feature of college and career readiness. To thrive in
today’s global society,...
E-Newsletters
The School & Classroom Program Coordinator will send you an e-
newsletter six times per year. These newslett...
Manage your Partnership
Please use these helpful steps to ensure a successful partnership.
1. Print and save contact infor...
membership at-large. One teacher is highlighted in each e-newsletter. Please send us photos of your
students in action to ...
Project Listing
The following projects are suggestions for teachers who want to incorporate global education concepts into...
Want more? Connect to PTPI’s Global Network of members and educators by
becoming a member of People to People Internationa...
Support International Education Week!
International Education Week (IEW), jointly sponsored by the U.S. Departments of Sta...
Tips for Success
• Communicate with your partner teacher. Staying in touch is the key to success. Be honest and
clear abou...
Forty-five students from Russia and the United
States participated in this video conference,
learning more about their par...
Traveling Buddy
Magazine Project: Celebrating Global Differences
Recommended ages: 4-13
A popular project for younger stud...
Class Culture
Creative Writing: Personal Values
Start Cooking: Recipes Project
Recommended ages: 10-18
This project demons...
A Day in My Life
Poems for Peace: Poetry Contest
Recommended ages: 9-13
In this project, students describe an average scho...
Everyone Smiles in the Same Language
Get to Know Your Partner
Recommended ages: 4-10
In this project, students think about...
Letter or Email Exchange
CONNECT | Connect with people of diverse countries and cultures!
Recommended ages: 4-18
The PTPI ...
Word Cloud: First Impressions & Stereotypes
Postcard Exchange
Friendship Quilts
Recommended ages: 9-18
In this project, st...
Understanding Culture
Stories and Folklore Project
Currency Project
LEARN | Develop global competence by learning about em...
Names around the Globe
Wonders of the World
Multiplicity of Music Project
Festival of Lights: Investigation and Presentati...
Science: Similar Environments in Different Countries
Friendship in Two Languages
The Form Language Takes
Recommended ages:...
Stamp Project
My Country’s Symbols and Government
Children of War
Recommended ages: 7-10
Students collect different stamps...
Community Service Project Award
Global Leaders of Tomorrow
Teacher-to-Teacher Exchange on Facebook!
While you are partnere...
People to People International (PTPI)
The purpose of People to People International is to offer multinational “people to p...
Frequently Asked Questions
Q. What is the teacher’s role?
A. Foremost, a teacher, advisor, youth director, supervisor, sco...
Frequently Asked Questions Continued
Q. Can I propose a project not in the manual?
A. Yes. You may modify projects to fit ...
This form should be filled out if you wish to have your students’ creative project work and/or photograph in connection
wi...
Registration is open July – October. Registrations received before or after this time will be held as pending until the
re...
Evaluations are important to People to People International (PTPI)! Your feedback ensures we are able to provide the
most ...
□ Student Membership (ages 12-18) $25
□ Individual Membership (ages 25+) $45
□ Family Membership (couples/families without...
Notes:
Contact information for my partner teacher:
2014 Global Youth Murals project winners
2015 2016 program manual
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2015 2016 program manual

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The School & Classroom Program supports the development of globally minded and culturally competent students. If you are a teacher of students ages 4-18, we invite you to register your class or youth group. After registering, we will match you with the teacher of students of a similar age group in another country. Registration is open July through October each year.

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2015 2016 program manual

  1. 1. 2015-2016 Manual 130 COUNTRIES | 300,000 STUDENTS | 4,300 TEACHERS Bring the world to your classroom!
  2. 2. CONTENTS The School & Classroom Program Manual is an information resource for teachers published annually by People to People International. 3 Overview 4 Benefits 4 Program Policy 4 Terms of Safety 5 E-Newsletters 5 Registration & Finding a Partner Class 6 Manage your Partnership 7 Connect through Technology 8 Project Listing 10 Project Identification 10 International Education Week 11 Tips for Success 12 Projects 23 Exchange on Facebook 24 People to People International 25 Frequently Asked Questions 27 Program-Related Forms It is our vision that a cross-cultural network of engaged & knowledgeable everyday citizen leaders will be an active force in creating and sustaining a more peaceful world. EXPERIENCE CONNECT LEARN LEAD PTPI’s School & Classroom Program The School & Classroom Program (SCP) is operated by People to People International. This free service links teachers and their students with classes in other countries for pen pal exchanges and projects that improve cultural understanding and encourage friendship. Schools from 130 countries have participated in this rewarding program. We are pleased that you have joined our community! People to People International President Eisenhower’s belief that “peaceful relations between nations requires understanding and mutual respect between individuals” is as relevant today as when he first envisioned our organization nearly six decades ago. Today, our mission continues to resonate with members across the globe, yet we are ever changing in our quest to provide expanded opportunities that engage a new generation of globally-minded citizens. People to People International creates lasting cross-cultural connections between everyday citizens around the world to help them explore global issues, serve and enrich their diverse communities, and become more effective leaders in creating a more peaceful world. People to People International, with World Headquarters in Kansas City, Missouri, USA, was established by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower on September 11, 1956. PTPI, an NGO with a U.S. not-for-profit, [501(c) (3)] tax rating, has reached more than 160 countries with people of all ages participating in our programs. Staff Contact Information Chelsea Ducatte, Program Coordinator: classroom@ptpi.org People to People International World Headquarters • School & Classroom Program 2405 Grand Boulevard, Suite 500 • Kansas City, MO 64108 USA • +1.816.531.4701 phone • +1.816.561.7502 fax classroom@ptpi.org • www.ptpi.org 2015-2016 Manual
  3. 3. PTPI views global competence as an essential feature of college and career readiness. To thrive in today’s global society, students need to communicate and collaborate across cultures and countries. Through the School & Classroom Program, students will experience other cultures, learn about global emerging trends and topics, acquire leadership skills, and make valuable connections. How can your students benefit? • Exposure to other parts of the world without leaving the classroom • Gaining knowledge about their own culture and that of another country • Motivation to be more careful with spelling, punctuation, grammar, and vocabulary as they write for an audience of their peers • Recognizing the historical forces that have shaped the current world system • Gathering, comparing, and contrasting information for stronger reasoning skills • Considering issues of global concern • Expanding their intellectual curiosity and becoming more inquisitive thinkers • Developing an appreciation for other cultures, countries, and perspectives • Creating friendships that can last a lifetime • Language learning with native speakers • Opportunities to connect with new friends around the world through the PTPI network • Recognition for participating in School & Classroom Program projects U.S. Teachers: Are you considering applying to be National Board Certified? Use the School & Classroom Program project as one of your four portfolio entries! Benefits More than 295,000 students and 4,200 teachers from 130 countries have participated and benefited from the School & Classroom Program's partnerships and projects. Program Policy People to People International’s School & Classroom Program is strictly for the exchange of educational materials and data to promote understanding, respect, and friendship among students of different countries and cultures. It is unacceptable for participants to use the program as a way to gain monetary assistance, or educational or domestic supplies unless approved as part of a specific project. Please direct questions and report incidents to the Program Coordinator. Terms of Safety The School & Classroom Program does not request nor does it distribute residential addresses of teachers, administrators, or students. Nor does it share the names of teachers or schools with other persons, organizations, or businesses. Through intentional cultural education, exploration of global challenges, and firsthand experiences, individuals gain the tools to lead and enrich their unique communities. 4
  4. 4. E-Newsletters The School & Classroom Program Coordinator will send you an e- newsletter six times per year. These newsletters will come from classroom@ptpi.org. Each newsletter will include opportunities for you and your students, as well as updates on seasonal news and events. Registration & Finding a Partner Class You have registered with the School & Classroom Program and now you are wondering what happens next. This section tells you what to expect. You will receive a welcome email from the Program Coordinator. This message will arrive from classroom@ptpi.org with the subject line “Registration: PTPI’s School & Classroom Program.” Please save this email address to your contacts and respond to the email at your earliest convenience so that we know your email address works. If we do not receive a response, we will not move forward with your request for a partner. We will mail a manual to your school. All registered teachers will receive the School & Classroom Program Manual. This booklet offers guidance, tips for communication, and project ideas. Please review the entire manual. If you are the coordinator for a group of classes and teachers, you may request additional copies of the manual. We will find a partner class for you and your students. We match classes from July through October each year. Groups are matched with partner classes that have a similar number of pupils of similar age (possibly one year younger or older) in one of the three requested countries. We also consider your access to technology and communication preferences (e.g., postal mail versus email). We match classes as quickly as possible. The process depends on the availability of classes in your students’ age range in the countries requested on the registration form. Choosing “no preference” versus selecting specific countries often speeds up the matching process. If a partner class from one of the countries that you requested is not immediately available, often we can seek a class through our network of contacts. Please note that seeking a class may take only a few days in some cases, while other times it may take 6-8 weeks; if this is the case, we will contact you to see if you are interested in changing your preferences in order to speed the process. If we cannot find a partner class, we will contact you alternative options. Need more information? We may have answered your question in the Frequently Asked Questions section on page 30. We will arrange a partner class. When we have matched your class with a partner classroom, we will provide the contact details for teachers so that they may communicate directly. We will send you name, school name, school address, and email address of your partner teacher along with details about your partner class. Please acknowledge that you received the information and then save it. Now you can begin! 5
  5. 5. Manage your Partnership Please use these helpful steps to ensure a successful partnership. 1. Print and save contact information for your partner teacher(s). If the information is lost, contact the Program Coordinator. 2. Save the name(s) of your partner teacher(s) to your email address book/contacts and add them to your email safe list so they are less likely to be rejected by your email service. Spam filters often complicate the ease of communication. 3. Introduce yourself to your partner teacher by email. Send a message within a few days of receiving information about your partner teacher. Be sure to include text such as “Greetings from your partner teacher” or “School & Classroom Program” in the subject line. Be sure to include the following in your message: • Your name • Your school’s name • Your students’ ages and the size of your class(es) • Your intentions and goals for the partnership • Any projects you already feel strongly about completing • Some details about your country and your community 4. Learn about your partner’s country. Have your students locate the country on a world map and research facts about the country’s geography, people, history, government, and economics. Accurate profiles for different countries can be found at the World Factbook website (http://bit.ly/1QwHPR) or at the BBC News website (http://bit.ly/XTULO). 5. Choose a method of communication. Decide how teachers and students will communicate. It is important that partner teachers email consistently to quickly and efficiently share ideas and to motivate each other. Although traditional pen pal relationships are accomplished through writing paper letters, you and your students have a world of options! Technology resources are listed on page 7. 6. Choose projects from the manual and incorporate your own ideas. Suggest two or three projects, ask for feedback, and respond to your partner’s ideas. (See the Project Listing on page 8.) 7. Collaborate with your partner teacher to create a project timeline and goals. 8. Communicate regularly. We suggest partner teachers communicate by email once a week or at least three times per month. Communication can be as brief as sending a greeting, confirming packages were sent and received, or sharing school holiday schedules. Read messages and letters to your students so communication is consistent and you remain connected. Student interaction is usually once or twice a month. The students’ role is to work on project materials (e.g., letters, bios, cultural information) to send to their partner classroom(s). 9. Update the Program Coordinator. We appreciate hearing from you, so please send updates to the Program Coordinator two to three times per school year. Your news may be shared in one of PTPI’s publications, which are circulated to other teachers in the School & Classroom Program and to PTPI’s 6
  6. 6. membership at-large. One teacher is highlighted in each e-newsletter. Please send us photos of your students in action to be included! 10. Thank your partner. As the school year ends, be sure to thank your partner teacher and students for their project work and sharing. 11. Make a plan for next school year. Do you and your partner teacher intend to continue the partnership next school year? If yes, please inform the Program Coordinator so they can update your records with PTPI and send you next year’s edition of the School & Classroom Program Manual. Connect through Technology Incorporating technology into your partnership can be mutually beneficial by enhancing the communication, ease, and efficiency of global collaboration. Finding a virtual learning space for you and your partner classroom to communicate will help develop intercultural competencies for your students that are not possible in traditional curriculum. Including technology in your partnership will only enhance your outcomes. Here are some free online tools that will enhance your partnership: Twitter Create an account for your class. Follow updates from your partner class and share your own. Want to see what other educators are doing to make it a smaller world? Follow the hashtags #globaled, #globalclassroom, #globallearning, and #flatclass to join the ongoing discussion on global education and collaboration. Skype Skype is a software application that allows users to make voice and video calls over the Internet. Calls to other Skype users are free! Use instant messaging, file transfer, and video conferencing to enhance your partnership. YouTube |TeacherTube | SchoolTube Share videos with your partner classroom. Blogger Create a free blog to share information about your class with your partner class. Privacy settings are available to protect your content. Prezi Prezi offers an alternative to traditional PowerPoint slides for your students to create engaging storytelling and virtual presentations. Voice Thread Upload, share, and discuss documents, presentations, images, audio files, and videos with your partner class. VoiceThread offers more than 50 different types of media. Your VoiceThread can be private or shared with your partner teacher. Google Calendar, Google Docs, & Google Translate Create a Google account with your partner to take advantage of a variety of Google services and products. Use the Google Calendar to schedule projects and activities you plan to do together, use Google Docs to share and collaborate on documents, and use Google Translate to help overcome language barriers. 7
  7. 7. Project Listing The following projects are suggestions for teachers who want to incorporate global education concepts into their classroom. These projects give teachers a place to begin and examples to consider. Some projects are designed for you to do with your partner, and others can be done independently. We encourage teachers to modify or incorporate additional concepts or technology into projects to better suit their needs, goals, and resources. Project suggestions are welcome. The projects are grouped into sections based on PTPI’s mission: creating multinational experiences and cross-cultural learning, building global leadership skills, and making people-to-people connections. Please note that because of the interdisciplinary nature of many PTPI projects, these groupings are meant as a guide only. Full descriptions begin on page 12. EXPERIENCE | Individuals can better connect with cultures when they make unforgettable memories together through purposeful engagement. We value immersion experiences as the gateway to a deeper appreciation of diverse cultures. 13 Global Youth Murals This project provides the opportunity for students to create artwork that depicts different cultures and their interpretation of friendship, peace, and making cross-cultural connections. Winners are chosen each year and are published in PTPI’s quarterly newsletter, Connections. 13 Video Conference Conduct a video conference between partner classes. 14 Traveling Buddy This is a popular project that lets younger students exchange a buddy between partner classrooms 14 Magazine Project: Celebrating Global Differences Partner classes collaborate to create a magazine featuring articles about themselves. 15 Class Culture Students determine the cultural universals found in their classroom and learn about those of their partner class. 15 Creative Writing: Personal Values Students write short essays about their personal values in life. 15 Start Cooking Recipes Project Students choose favorite recipes to create a recipe book for their partner class. This project encourages classrooms to prepare and sample recipes from other cultures. 16 A Day in My Life Students describe an average school day to their partner classroom. 16 Poems for Peace in Our World: Poetry Contest Students compose poems expressing the concept of peace for our world. Student can contribute poems to be considered for publication in the PTPI newsletter, Connections. 17 Everyone Smiles in the Same Language Students exchange photographs of smiles – their own, their pets’, their families’, their friends’ – and make gratitude journals about the things that make them smile. 17 Get to Know Your Partner This introductory project helps classes gain a better cultural understanding of their international peers. CONNECT | PTPI connects people of diverse countries and cultures, and facilitates the building of long-term meaningful relationships across borders. 27 Letter or Email Exchange This project to acquaints classrooms and facilitates a successful partnership through email or letter exchange. 28 Word Cloud: First Impressions and Stereotypes Students discuss first impressions and stereotypes of their partner class and of their own community and culture. 28 Postcard Exchange Classrooms exchange postcards created or purchased by students. 28 Friendship Quilts Students create a quilt depicting themselves, their writings, and their culture.
  8. 8. Want more? Connect to PTPI’s Global Network of members and educators by becoming a member of People to People International today. For access to members- only projects, program-related documents, and more: www.ptpi.org/join LEARN | Through intentional cultural education, exploration of global challenges, and firsthand experiences, individuals gain the tools to lead and enrich their unique communities. 18 Understanding Culture Help students understand the meaning of culture. 18 Stories and Folklore Project Gather stories and folklore from around the world that emphasize good moral values, such as kindness, honesty, respect, friendship, and hard work. 18 Currency Project Classrooms exchange the units of coin and paper currency from their country. Learn about exchange rates. 19 Names around the Globe This project encourages students to think about the origin and history of their own name. 19 Wonders of the World Students research and share information about the different “Wonders of the World “within your nation. 19 Multiplicity of Music Project Compile music files with the diverse music types in your country for your partner classroom. 19 Festival of Lights: Investigation and Presentation Students research a festival from another country and present their findings in an essay and visual presentation. 20 Science: Similar Environments in Different Countries Students study or visit the same environment and compare/contrast data. 20 Friendship in Two Languages Exchange greetings recorded in your native language or create video presentations showing your classroom, city, native dances, theater productions, etc. 21 The Form Language Takes This project allows foreign language students to reconstruct an image of a person or character described to them in another language. Partner classrooms then compare the original and reconstructed images. 21 Stamp Project Collect and exchange stamps with your partner classroom, then explain the significance of the images on the stamps from your country. 22 My Country’s Symbols and Government This project focuses upon patriotism and the construction of a scrapbook exhibiting and explaining a classroom’s national symbols and government. 22 Children of War Students gather articles, books, or documentary films about children of war and choose five to eight to read/view and analyze. LEAD | Our world needs more leaders – everyday people who are eager to understand others & to make a difference 24 Community Service Project Award Students perform a community service project to earn recognition from People to People International. Nominations are due April 1. 25 Global Leaders of Tomorrow Students give presentations on a variety of career paths and explain the skills necessary to get the job. 9
  9. 9. Support International Education Week! International Education Week (IEW), jointly sponsored by the U.S. Departments of State and Education, is held the third week of November (in 2015, IEW is November 16-20). During this week, individuals, schools, and organizations worldwide host activities that celebrate cross-cultural relationships and learning. Teachers and students in PTPI’s School & Classroom Program can support IEW by asking a guest, artist, or performer from another country to visit the classroom to give a presentation and answer questions; sending a special message or gesture of friendship to your partner classroom; organizing a visit to a museum to learn about another country; or inviting other teachers at your school to join the School & Classroom Program. For additional ideas and to post your activity for others around the world, visit http://iew.state.gov/. If you are planning something for IEW, please contact us at classroom@ptpi.org. We want to share news about your efforts with other teachers in the School & Classroom Program and with our PTPI membership at-large. Project Identification Use the following icons to quickly search for the projects that best suit your interests. Use the internet for research and to deepen the learning experience Use email to share with your partner class Work independently – these projects do not require working with your partner Use postal mail to share with your partner class Creative projects incorporating the arts PTPI gives awards for participation in this project. Don't be left out! Projects created for foreign language teachers Community service emphasis Environmental topics
  10. 10. Tips for Success • Communicate with your partner teacher. Staying in touch is the key to success. Be honest and clear about your intentions and expectations. • Contact your partner teacher in a timely manner. When beginning a partnership, introduce yourself to your partner teacher as soon as possible. If you do not receive a response to an email message, please follow up or resend it as it may have been lost or not received. If you do not get a response within 10 days, inform the Program Coordinator so they can contact your partner teacher. • Use technology to connect. Cheaper than a plane ticket, the internet allows you to communicate face-to-face, to collaborate on a writing project, or to research your partner class’s country. • Share school and holiday schedules. As a holiday nears, provide your departure and return dates. Learn the difference between your time zone and that of your partner. • Guarantee positive representation of you and your country. Remember that you and your students represent your country. Students should take care when composing letters and projects by using their best spelling, grammar, and punctuation. • Ensure language is cross-cultural. Consider what needs explanation or description for an audience from another culture. Slang and colloquial language must be used carefully and meanings should be explained as needed. • Learn about international mail and customs policies for your partner’s country. International mail requires different postage than domestic mail. Your post office can help you with postage rates for airmail, the preferred method to send letters and parcels. Finally, you may be asked to complete a short customs form. Always identify the contents of your letter or parcel as a GIFT on customs forms to ensure delivery and do not gift wrap the contents. • Ask questions. If you are unsure how to proceed on any matter, contact the Program Coordinator. Be honest with your partner teacher(s) when you are confused about any communication discrepancies. • Be a responsible partner. If for any reason you can no longer participate, please inform the Program Coordinator and your partner so a new classroom can be assigned. When a partnership ends without explanation, students tend to take this personally and question whether their partner disliked them. As the school year ends, inform your partner teacher. Consider a plan for next school year. Will you work together again? If yes, please inform the Program Coordinator. Most importantly, if you plan to continue working together, stay in touch with your partner teacher during the summer or winter breaks to assure them of your continued interest. • Record your partnership. Take pictures of your students writing letters, opening letters, and working on projects with their partner. Keep them for yourself, but also send them to classroom@ptpi.org so that we can highlight your work in e-newsletters and various publications. 11
  11. 11. Forty-five students from Russia and the United States participated in this video conference, learning more about their partner class, face to face. Special thanks to their teachers, Lyubov Parfenova and Donna Dooner, for making this happen. Video Conference Global Youth Murals EXPERIENCE | Grow personally and professionally through sharing your culture and experiencing new people, places, cultures & ideas. Recommended ages: 4-18 Please join us for this extraordinary project! The Global Youth Murals project invites students to create artwork that illustrates their cultures, communities, and ideas about friendship and Peace through Understanding. Two to six murals will be featured in PTPI’s quarterly newsletter, Connections. Each year, we will include photographs of several murals in our online galleries, available on the PTPI Facebook page (www.facebook.com/peopletopeople). Be sure to visit all of the galleries for inspiration! This project is ongoing and new submissions are accepted annually. The deadline for the 2015 project is October 30; however, murals may be sent year round. Past Global Youth Murals have included flags, landscapes, landmarks, notable citizens/leaders, festivals, holidays, holy days, and native cuisine, clothing, and proverbs. Students have depicted their schools, homes, and themselves. Murals have represented friendships with pen pals in another country. This year’s theme is Human Rights. For the 2015 guidelines or for questions about how to create a mural, contact us at classroom@ptpi.org. Want to see which murals won awards last year? The 2014 winning murals are featured on the back cover of this manual. Recommended ages: 7-18 Set up a scheduled video conference between your two classes. Pick a time that works for students in both countries. This is a great opportunity to meet face to face without leaving the classroom, while introducing your students to new technology. Invite the students to prepare a welcome message to their partner class. One student should be chosen ahead of time to deliver the welcome. Prior to the video conference, have your students write out any questions they may want to ask. Assign one or more students to ask the questions. Younger students will need teachers to lead the call. If you have older students, they will feel more ownership if you allow them to speak directly to their peers and lead the conference. This is a great leadership training opportunity. 12
  12. 12. Traveling Buddy Magazine Project: Celebrating Global Differences Recommended ages: 4-13 A popular project for younger students is exchanging a traveling buddy between partner classrooms. Students of each classroom select a buddy, often an animal or character, that is associated with the class’s region. For example, a classroom in Egypt chose a camel to send to its partner. The buddy is sent to your partner classroom, perhaps carrying a greeting or photograph; you might even send a disposable camera with it that can be returned later for developing. After the buddy reaches its destination, allow the students of your partner classroom to name it. They provide a piece of clothing or other article specific to their partner’s region for the buddy. The Egyptian camel received boots when he traveled to Canada! After naming, the buddy is introduced to the classroom and school it is visiting. Take photographs or have students draw images of what the buddy sees and experiences, such as meeting the principal, eating lunch, the playground, nap time, learning mathematics, etc. A different student takes the buddy home at the end of each school day for an overnight visit and returns it the next day. During the evenings, students record the buddy's different adventures and experiences by taking photographs (disposable cameras are acceptable quality and parents can take photographs) or writing them in a simple pen pal letter. After the buddy has gone home with all students and the teacher, it is returned to his home classroom carrying the photographs and letters recording his journey. Recommended ages: 11-14 This project can be adjusted for other age groups. Partner classes collaborate to create a magazine, enabling students to write and illustrate stories about themselves and their partner class. While students prepare articles, they begin to understand and accept differences, and develop empathy and acceptance for others. The completed magazine (or more than one issue, if you are ambitious) is a perfect souvenir or reminder of their experience of having a partner class in another part of the world. Here are some guidelines for how to create a magazine: • Introduce students to the country or region of the world where their partner class is located. • Talk with students to generate themes and types of articles for the magazine. Discuss ideas with your partner class. Examples include interviewing students from your partner class by email or online tools for first-person descriptions of everyday life and topics such as sports, school events, and family. • Help students to write and revise articles. Think about photos to include. • Publish the magazine. Ideas include creating a blog or assigning a number of printed pages to each class. If your class creates multiple issues of the magazine, this project can be used to record the partnership from the beginning to end of the school year. Students in Nora Davidson’s class in Idaho USA welcome a Traveling Buddy “My studentsare correspondingwith students fromCalifornia andFlorida, whichis greatbecausethey representtwo different perspectivesandcontexts. Thisexperience taught me a lot.” Brahim Elkhalil Afaichil, Morocco 13
  13. 13. Class Culture Creative Writing: Personal Values Start Cooking: Recipes Project Recommended ages: 10-18 This project demonstrates the variety of cultures within a single classroom. As everyone has a different culture, the challenge of this project is to determine the shared ideas that make up your class’s collective culture. To begin to understand people of different cultures, students must first understand that there are certain elements common to all human cultures, called “cultural universals.” Cultural universals may include religion, values, games, music, rites of passage, and so on. After discussing this concept with students, concentrate on the universal idea of “right and wrong.” Explain and discuss how each culture has its own ideas about acceptable or unacceptable behavior and work with the students to reach an agreement on the behavioral norms of the class’s culture. Have each student make a private list of things that they consider to be wrong or unacceptable behavior. After 10 minutes, students divide into groups of two or three and share their lists with the rest of the class. Have students organize their ideas into categories, and then create lists for their group. In order for an idea to be on the group list, all students in a group must agree to it. The teacher may need to remind students that everyone has their own culture as a result of their individual upbringing and life experiences; the goal is to determine things that everyone in the class can agree upon. After the groups have made a group list, they can join another group and repeat the process. Next, all ideas from each group are written so everyone can see them. Remind students that everyone has discussed and defended their ideas at least twice. Everyone must agree on an idea for it to be a part of the class culture. If there are disagreements, students may make short speeches about their ideas and reasons in an attempt to persuade others to their viewpoint. Ultimately, the remaining ideas represent the “cultural universals” of the class. Recommended ages: 13-18 Students write short essays about their personal values in life. Students express and describe the rules, ideals, and principles by which they live, and explain the sources of their values (e.g., reading, life experiences, religion, culture, family, role models). After exchanging copies of their essays with a partner, students discuss what they have learned about their own values and those of their partner. Finally, students discuss with their partner how they can initiate change within their communities. Recommended ages: 10-18 Students choose favorite recipes to create a recipe book for their partner classroom. Recipes should represent each classroom’s culture or region and be simple enough for most students to prepare. Please include images of food as it appears fully prepared, when possible. Classrooms can choose one or more recipes from their partner classroom cookbook to prepare and sample. Students write a review of the prepared food that includes overall appearance, complexity of preparation, expense of ingredients, originality, aroma, and taste. Consider how your classroom’s food compares to that of your partner classroom’s culture and region. Ask students to be open-minded and adventurous when tasting the food. 14
  14. 14. A Day in My Life Poems for Peace: Poetry Contest Recommended ages: 9-13 In this project, students describe an average school day to their partner classroom. The goal is to present a cohesive timeline and description of an average school day for youth in your country/culture. Ask each student to document one school day from the time they wake to the time they go to sleep. Explain the need to consider environment, time, food, clothing, school, and extracurricular activities. Suggested questions for students: • What time do you wake in the morning? • What pattern of activities do you perform to get ready for school? • What do you typically wear to school? • How do you travel to school? • What signals the start of school? What time does school begin? • How do the sights and sounds in the hallway change during different times of the day? • What subjects do you study? • When is lunch? What do you eat? Where do you eat? • When does school end? What do you do after school? • Do you go outside during your day? What does it look and sound like? • What is your favorite time of the day? What is your least favorite time of day? • When do you go to sleep? Together, students use their experiences and documentation to tell the story of a typical school day in their culture. Use the questions to guide the day’s timeline and descriptions. Indicate variances; for instance, traveling to school might include public transportation, such as bus or train, walking, and driving. Consider dividing students into teams to work on parts of the day’s timeline and descriptions. To complete the project, exchange descriptions and photographs between partner classrooms. Discuss the differences and similarities with your students. Recommended ages: 13-18 We invite your students to submit poems expressing the concept of peace for our world to be considered for publication in our quarterly newsletter, Connections. Poems may be submitted at any time. Please email submissions to classroom@ptpi.org or mail to: People to People International World Headquarters | Attn: Poems for Peace | 2405 Grand Boulevard, Suite 500 | Kansas City, MO 64108 | USA Poems may be composed in any format or length and must be students’ original work. Submit poems with a signed parental permission, provided on page 32. You may request more information from the Program Coordinator. “When the Americankids startedwritingabout theirfavorite thingsandtalkingabout solving thesameproblemsin different ways,wequickly gotthe deep understanding that thereisno culture better than theother – weareall somuchthe same.” David Yayravi, Ghana
  15. 15. Everyone Smiles in the Same Language Get to Know Your Partner Recommended ages: 4-10 In this project, students think about the power of a smile and that everyone, no matter their origin or location, smiles in the same language. All people experience humor and happiness regardless of characteristics like culture, race, language, age, ability, or gender. Exchange Photographs: Have students select a few scanned or original photographs of smiles -- their own, their pets’, their families’, friends’, etc. – to exchange with their partner. Include explanations of the photographs’ content – who is smiling, and why? Gratitude Journals: Students compose gratitude journals about the things or actions that make them smile. Ask students to write an entry in a notebook each day for one month. In the entries, students should describe the events or actions that made them happy or grateful. (Teachers may determine entry length.) Each week, ask students to select and share one entry from their journals with their classmates and their partner classroom. Student entries can be combined and sent in a single email message, or neatly written out and mailed as a package to their partner classroom. Emailing via teacher email accounts is the preferred method of exchange. Remind students that this project emphasizes acceptance and understanding of their international and domestic peers. Ask students to be considerate of different lifestyles and the value of different experiences. As partner classes exchange information and classroom discussions ensue, students often realize they are grateful for the lifestyle and privileges of their country, homes, or school. They also gain a better cultural understanding of peers in another part of the world. Recommended ages: 4-18 This introductory project helps students gain a better cultural understanding of their peers. After completion, send your students’ work to your partner classroom. Students prepare answers to the topics below, and then exchange their answers with their partner classroom by email. Be courteous by giving explanations for answers that may not be easily understood by your partner classroom. For example, one classroom wrote that baklava is a dessert made of baked pastry with sweet filling between thin layers of dough. If students do not understand their partner classroom’s answers, ask for clarification or ask students to do simple research. 1. Examples of food we eat 2. Types of homes we live in 3. Information about the school we attend 3a. Description of our school and its location 3b. Total number of students at our school 3c. Subjects we study 3d. Days of the week and hours of the day we attend school 3e. School year (when it begins and ends) 4. Clothing we wear 5. Climate/weather we have 6. Languages we speak 7. Ways we greet one another 8. Religions we practice 9. Popular sports/games we play or compete in 10. Holidays we celebrate 11. Music we listen to 12. Rules of polite behavior and ways we greet people 13. Three most important historical events of our country 14. Three important values or goals we have 15. Three biggest concerns about our lives and about the world 16. Optional: additional information we want to share 16
  16. 16. Letter or Email Exchange CONNECT | Connect with people of diverse countries and cultures! Recommended ages: 4-18 The PTPI School & Classroom Program encourages partners to build the foundation of their relationship with a project that acquaints students with those of their partner classroom or school. A letter or email with a photograph from each student is a good way to begin. Review the letter and email samples below. Letters and email messages can be supplemented with photographs, drawings, scanned images, etc. Classrooms can use this project throughout the duration of their partnership to compare students’ daily lives, hobbies, concerns, ideas, etc. Please review students’ text for cultural sensitivity and correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Attention classes that speak English as a first language: Because you are often linked with students who are learning English, we recommend that your class initiates the letter or email exchange. SAMPLE LETTER Dear Friend, My name is Emma. I am 12 years old and in the seventh grade. I am writing to you from my school, Maize South Middle School, in Wichita, Kansas in the United States of America. I have enclosed a photograph with this letter. I have two younger brothers. My brothers’ names are Ethan and Alex. My mother is an elementary school teacher, and my father is an accountant at a bank. We live in a one-story house that is red with white trim. We have a pet cat named Franklin. My hometown is located in the central United States – called the Midwest. About 350,000 people live here, but there are many towns and cities close to us. The weather changes dramatically almost weekly. One week the weather will be nice and warm, and a week later it will be cold, rainy, and windy. The summer is usually hot and humid, while the winter is cold and snowy. I like living in the United States. My family has traveled to many different states. This is a beautiful country. I would like to learn about you and your country. Sincerely, Emma Johnson (female) SAMPLE EMAIL EXCHANGE Below is the recommended format for an email exchange. Each student composes one or two questions for their partner classroom. Ask students to share their questions with the entire class to avoid repetition. Type the questions in one document to send by email. Partner students answer the questions and pose their own. The exchange continues so forth. 1. Jacob (male) There is a “Just Say No to Drugs” campaign at our school. We learned about identifying drug abuse, its consequences and how not to respond to peer pressure. Do you have a similar program about drug awareness at your school? If yes, please tell me about it. 2. Diego (male) I play football. It is my favorite sport. What I call football, you call soccer in the United States. What sports do you play? What sports are played at your school? 3. Aurelia (female) What are your favorite foods? Do you have special eating habits like using chop sticks, fasting, or praying before meals? My favorite food to eat is pizza with crumbled hamburger on top. 4. Jin (male) What subjects do you study? What languages can you speak? I am Chinese-American, so I can speak Mandarin and English. Both languages are spoken at my house. 17
  17. 17. Word Cloud: First Impressions & Stereotypes Postcard Exchange Friendship Quilts Recommended ages: 9-18 In this project, students will learn about perceptions and stereotypes. The beginning of this project is about first impressions. Start off the project by asking your students to brainstorm words that they think of when they think about their partner class’s country. Take those words and create a word cloud (visual representation for text data) using a website like Wordle, Taxedo, or WordItOut. Next, have your students make a word cloud using of words that do NOT describe your partner’s country. Questions for the students: How do stereotypes affect your behavior toward others? Can stereotypes change? What can you do to reduce stereotyping? Now that you can see your words in one visual thought, would you make any changes? What would a world cloud about your own country look like? In the end, exchange your word clouds with your partner class and review the words with your class. Are your students surprised by the perception of their own country? Can they identify with the words in your partner class’s word cloud? Do they want to change any stereotypes? Recommended ages: 4-18 Each student exchanges a postcard that they purchase or create using newspaper/magazine clippings, photographs, drawings, etc. Postcards should display sites, monuments, surroundings, or notable citizens of students’ town, city, region, state, or country. The postcards should bear meaningful messages of friendship and facts about the images featured. Recommended ages: 4-18 Students create a quilt depicting themselves, their school, culture, and country from fabric, mixed materials, or digital technology. Each student is responsible for creating one quilt square. Partner classrooms exchange quilts and display them in the school to commemorate the friendship established. Be imaginative. For a fabric quilt, students can sew the quilt or make the process simpler by using fabric paints, markers, or glue to assemble fabric swatches, ribbons, or buttons to create images. For a mixed media quilt, illustrations can be drawn, painted, clipped from magazines or newspapers, or printed, and can be decorated with glitter, buttons, ribbons, paper, etc. “ The School& ClassroomProgramhas enriched our learning experienceand we havereached outfromourclassroom to the wide worldaroundus. We haveappreciatedandcelebrated our differencesandsimilarities.” Slavica Jević, Serbia
  18. 18. Understanding Culture Stories and Folklore Project Currency Project LEARN | Develop global competence by learning about emerging trends and topics from a cross-cultural perspective. Recommended ages: 8-18 Students must understand the meaning of culture so they can evaluate the ways their own culture has shaped their identity and how they understand others. Ask your students to define the term “culture,” then ask for their opinions about other cultures, particularly that of their partner classroom. Introduce the concept of culture and then discuss features of culture. What are the features of our culture? What are the features of other cultures? Below are examples of features that may be evaluated and discussed: Styles of dress Foods Ways of greeting people Importance of time Values Concept of beauty Attitudes about personal space Holiday customs Nature of friendship Religious beliefs Concept of fairness/justice Attitude toward age Recommended ages: 4-18 Students gather stories and folklore from around the world or unique to their region that emphasize good moral values, such as kindness, honesty, respect, friendship, and hard work. Classrooms exchange stories and folk tales by email or copy and assemble them into a book and send by mail. Students then examine the meaning of each story or folk tale and identify its moral value. Students can make a book cover and create illustrations for each story or folk tale. Recommended ages: 8-13 Students exchange the units of coin and paper currency from their countries. Mount and display the currency in a fashion, such as a notebook, that allows students to identify each unit and its amount, and the cumulative amount of all units (e.g. United States: $1.91). Also compile a list of sample purchases that could be made with each currency unit or a combination of currency. Partner classrooms exchange displays. “ My students realizedthat students intheUSAarenormal peoplewithnormal problems – they arepeople likethem and not likethe onesthey see infilms. They alsoappreciated thevalueof learningEnglish!” Aleka Mela, Greece 19
  19. 19. Names around the Globe Wonders of the World Multiplicity of Music Project Festival of Lights: Investigation and Presentation Recommended ages: 9-14 In this project, students research information about their own names. Students explore and answer these questions: • How are names given in your country? • Who takes part in naming children and how is it done? • How are last names formed? • Do you have more than one last name? • Are middle names given? • What does this process mean for students, their parents, and their grandparents? Share results with your partner class via email. Recommended ages: 9-15 Students research the “Wonders of the World” and share significant monuments or accomplishments – “wonders” – of their country with their partner classroom. Choose a set of “wonders” from the Ancient World, Forgotten World, Natural World, Man-Made World, African World, European World, Asian World, American World, and others. Divide students into groups and assign each group one or two wonders from the chosen set. Direct students to books, electronic resources, and other materials, so they may read about and see photographs, drawings, or paintings of their assigned wonder. Ask students to compile a report about the historic characteristics of their wonder and to include selected images. Recommended ages: 13-18 Students in each classroom collect music from their home countries to record on audio files or CDs. Music submissions should originate from different time periods and be arranged chronologically on the audio file or CD to create a short music history. Students narrate the date and musical style (e.g., classical, folk, jazz, blues, rock, pop, country, soul, gospel, hip-hop, house, R&B, techno, and rap) between each recording. Please remember to speak clearly and not too fast. Classes then email the audio files or mail the CD to each other. Recommended ages: 9-12 Festivals with the theme of “light” are very common around the world. Students are assigned a festival celebrated in another country to research. Students will prepare three research questions and complete the project by writing an essay on their findings and preparing a visual presentation to teach their fellow classmates about the festival. The objective of this project is to promote tolerance of other cultures and religions, as well as introduce the students to other cultures and religions. Use this opportunity to teach about researching, note-taking, essay-writing, editing and presentations. A few examples of festivals are: Lantern/Moon festival (China), Diwali (India), Ligligan Parul (Philippines), Loi Krathong (Thailand), O’bon (Japan), Santa Lucia (Sweden), and Lyon Festival of Lights (France).
  20. 20. Science: Similar Environments in Different Countries Friendship in Two Languages The Form Language Takes Recommended ages: 4-18 Partner classes study or, even better, visit the same type of environment such as a zoo, wetland preserve, national park, or conservatory. Students in each country make a list of the types of animals and plant life they learn about or see. This project is a good exercise for students to research and analyze data about the animals and plants. They also gather images or take photographs if they can visit the environment. Classrooms exchange information and images via email so they can compare and contrast the types of animals and plant life they learn about or see in the same environment in each of their countries. Recommended ages: 12-18 Students split into groups to write short statements (three to five sentences) that extend friendship to the partner classroom and explain its importance. Students write in their native language and again in a second language. In both languages, students read the statements aloud and record them on an audio file or CD. The audio file or CD should feature a sequence of a statement in the students’ native language followed by the same statement in a second language and so on. Classrooms exchange the written statements along with the audio files, CDs, or videos posted online. Please remember to speak clearly and not too fast. If the technology is available, this project would be an opportunity to use YouTube to share your message. Other technology suggestions can be found on page 7. Recommended ages: 12-18 Students attempt to communicate specific images using writing skills. The classroom is split into groups that each illustrates a person or animal in their country. Groups focus on authentic appearance or attire and have fun combining unique facial and body features. Groups then describe their design in a second language using writing skills. Write each description with the knowledge that the students in your class or your partner classroom will try to recreate the same drawing by reading the description written by your students. Be as specific as possible. Partners exchange descriptions and use their reading skills to translate them. According to the translations, students then draw the people or animals designed and described by students in their partner classroom. Finally, students give their new drawings to those who wrote the descriptions. “ It's a great thing to communicatewitha partner who is thousands of kilometersfromusandknow a lot of interesting thingsabouteachother's lives.” Timea Bujdoso, Hungary 21
  21. 21. Stamp Project My Country’s Symbols and Government Children of War Recommended ages: 7-10 Students collect different stamps, or photocopy, scan, or print examples from old letters or found on the Internet. Stamps should be issued by students’ country. Mount the stamps in a way that allows students to describe the person, place, or event commemorated and the reason the stamp was issued, if possible. Also provide the price of each stamp and what may be mailed with it. Partner classrooms exchange stamp projects by scanning and sending via email or sending the project via postal mail. This project works well when combined with the Currency Project found on page 18. Recommended ages: 4-18 Patriotism is an important part of everyone’s life, particularly during times of strife and war. In this project, students construct a scrapbook exhibiting and explaining their country’s symbols and government. a. Compile images of state and country capitals, flags, and other national symbols. Include the stories of the flags’ creations and the symbols’ meaning. b. Provide information about your country’s government and compile a dictionary of terms as they are used in your country. For example, in the United States: President, Congress, state and federal governments, democracy, and elections. c. Incorporate informative, positive newspaper and magazine articles about your country’s government, symbols, and patriotism. d. Include the music and words of your national anthem. Explain how your anthem came to be written and adopted. Upon receiving similar items from your partner classroom, good discussion topics might be: e. Does our partner classroom feel the same about its country as we do? f. If we are each loyal to our own country, can we manage to live together in peace? Recommended ages: 13-18 Students gather articles, books, or documentary films about children of war and choose five to eight to read/view and analyze. Split students into groups assigned to each of the books, articles, or films chosen by the classroom. Each group identifies notable excerpts/scenes and develops questions for classroom discussion. The excerpts/scenes are read aloud/shown to the remaining students and the questions discussed. The biographic details of the articles, books and films, accompanying questions, and discussions are transmitted to a scrapbook that is shared with the partner classroom. Continued classroom discussion on children and war ensues after examination of the partner classroom’s scrapbook. “ PTPIunderstands thepower of relationshipstoinspirekids tochange theirworld!” Dale Peterson, Colorado USA
  22. 22. Community Service Project Award Global Leaders of Tomorrow Teacher-to-Teacher Exchange on Facebook! While you are partnered with one classroom, there are many teachers in this program from whom you and your students can gain insight. We invite you to introduce yourself to our closed Facebook group, which is open and visible only to School & Classroom Program participants. Join us at: http://www.facebook.com/groups/SchoolandClassroom. Here you can share photos, experiences, and get updates from the Program Coordinator. • Video Introduction: Send a video introducing yourself or your class to the School & Classroom Program Coordinator. The coordinator will then post the video on the School & Classroom Program Facebook group page. • Wall Post Introduction: Share a written introduction directly onto the Facebook page. Give a short description of you, your school, and your community! • Picture Introduction: Upload a picture to the Facebook group page to share! • Project Sharing: Did you complete a successful project? Share your experience, findings, and secrets to success! • Short Exchange: Do you want to exchange with a new teacher for one project? Use this Facebook group to find a partner. LEAD | Gain the skills necessary to lead from a global perspective. Recommended ages: 4-18 Students organize a project that benefits and serves their local community or that of their partner class. Examples include food drives, book drives, community clean up or beautification, and volunteering at hospitals, parks, schools, day-care centers, and homeless or pet shelters. Partner classrooms offer advice and updates to each other regarding the progress of their community service. Projects can stimulate classroom discussion or essays about the importance of serving others’ and one’s own community. Partner classrooms exchange photographs and/or news clippings of students performing community service and a summary of what they accomplished, and who benefited. Each year, one School & Classroom Community Service Project Award is presented to a class that has excelled in the organization and implementation of a community service project. Nominations for the award must be received by April 1. A reminder of the deadline will be included in e-newsletters. Nominations may be made through PTPI’s website at www.ptpi.org/community/SchoolClassProjAward.aspx. Recommended ages: 13-18 Students research five career paths. Divide students into groups and assign each one a career. Direct students to books, electronic resources, and other materials to discover what skills are necessary for each career path. Ask students to compile a list of global competence-related skills that are necessary for their chosen career. Will you have to work with people of different cultures? Will you need to know a second language? Have students compile results into a visual presentation; for example, a scrapbook, infographic, or poster board. Here is an example: 23
  23. 23. People to People International (PTPI) The purpose of People to People International is to offer multinational “people to people” experiences that foster cross-cultural learning, the development of global leadership skills, and the ability to connect with an international network of people committed to making a positive difference in the world. People to People International, with World Headquarters in Kansas City, Missouri USA, was established by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1956 to enhance international understanding and friendship. People to People International (PTPI), an NGO with a U.S. not-for-profit, [501(c)(3)] tax rating, has reached more than 160 countries with people of all ages participating in our programs. Membership The School & Classroom Program is one of many programs for adults and students offered by People to People International. Teachers may become at-large members of the organization or join a local PTPI chapter. Membership entitles you to extended and in-depth projects in the “MyPTPI” section of the website and opens the door to many PTPI programs. Our programs enable you to meet and form friendships with people around the world and learn more about the world’s diverse countries and cultures. You will also receive special member rates for programs, monthly e-news, quarterly newsletters, and access to scholarship opportunities for students in your life. Become a member of PTPI and show your commitment to advancing international understanding and friendship among the world’s people. PTPI Chapters Chapters are the backbone of PTPI, implementing the vision and purpose on a local level. Join our cross- cultural network of engaged and knowledgeable everyday citizen leaders, and be an active force in creating and sustaining a more peaceful world. Learn more about our global presence and see if there is a chapter near you on our website www.ptpi.org. Find PTPI on the Web www.Facebook.com/PeopletoPeople Log in today and become a fan of PTPI! In addition, there is a School & Classroom Program group to connect with other participating teachers. www.YouTube.com/ptpinetwork Watch PTPI-sponsored videos including those from travel programs and student chapters. www.Twitter.com/PTPI Follow PTPI’s daily tweets! http://blog.ptpi.org/ Visit the PTPI Blog to read stories about what PTPI members are doing around the world, join in the Global Book Club discussion, and follow PTPI travel experiences. 24
  24. 24. Frequently Asked Questions Q. What is the teacher’s role? A. Foremost, a teacher, advisor, youth director, supervisor, scout leader, etc. serves as the primary contact between partner classes or schools. This adult assumes responsibility for students’ communication and actions, and should review all student correspondence and project materials before they are sent to a partner class. Q. Is there any expense involved? A. The program is free; however, classrooms are responsible for the expense of mailing letters and sending project materials to their partner class. Q. What language do we use? A. Partner classrooms communicate in English or another language common to both groups. Q. How would a foreign language class participate? A. Second or foreign language classes often request to be paired with students who are native speakers of the language that they are studying. For example, students in France who are learning English are paired with a class in the United States that is learning French. To help both classes with the language they are learning, we would recommend that the students in France write in English and the students in the United States respond in French so that the partnership is mutually beneficial. It can be helpful for students to include a short paragraph in their native language in their letters or messages. This way, students of both classes may practice writing the language they are studying while retaining some comfort in also using their native language skills for reading. Q. May I have more than one partner for my class? A. Yes. However, it is very important to equally maintain relationships with all partners. We typically will ask you to begin by establishing one partnership and then contact us when you feel comfortable beginning a second partnership. Q. How long does a partnership last? A. We encourage partners to work together through one academic school year. After the year-long partnership, many teachers decide to continue to work together, while others re-register for a new partner each year. Q. I want to work with the same partner next year. How does this work? A. Please re-register with the School & Classroom Program so we have your current contact details and class information or contact the Program Coordinator at classroom@ptpi.org with the specifics of your continued partnership. Please indicate the teacher(s) you would like to continue working with on the form or in your email. If you do not re-register, then you may miss updated versions of the manual, announcements, student opportunities, or other news. Q. Is it necessary for teachers to have an email address? A. Yes. Communication with the Program Coordinator and your partner teacher will necessitate having a working email address. Email is the most effective method to correspond with a partner. Q. Do students need their own email addresses? A. No. We recommend electronic correspondence be exchanged between teacher email accounts or through a resource like Yahoo Groups (http://groups.yahoo.com/). If you are interested in safe, secure email accounts for your students that can be monitored, we recommend registering for School Mail on the ePals website (www.epals.com). If you assign individual email addresses to students, consult your school’s computer lab about employing an email filter that safely monitors messages and perhaps contact parents for permission. If you allow students to share their personal email addresses with other students, PTPI cannot be held responsible. “ This experiencegiveskidsan easy and practicalway to learn Englishandget to know another culture.” Lyudmila Golubeva, Russia
  25. 25. Frequently Asked Questions Continued Q. Can I propose a project not in the manual? A. Yes. You may modify projects to fit your needs. You are not required to implement our suggested projects. Q. I haven’t heard from my partner teacher. What should I do? A. All cultures perceive time differently. Ask yourself whether you have given your partner a reasonable amount of time to answer. If you are communicating by email, resend your last message because it is possible that it was not received. A lot of spam (illegitimate, unsolicited email) is invading email inboxes, so your email service (private or at school) may have increased the strength of spam filters. Your message to your partner teacher or their response to you may have been caught by a spam filter. Adding your partner teacher’s name to an email address book/contacts listing or safe list often corrects this problem. If you are using school email, talk with your computer administrator about options. Another option is to open a new email account with a free service such as Hotmail, Yahoo, or Gmail. If you still do not receive a response within 10-15 days, inform the Program Coordinator, who will contact your partner on your behalf. Most of the time, contact with your partner teacher can easily be re-established. If not, then we will try to arrange a new partner class as a replacement. Q. It is the end of the academic year. What should I do? A. Tell your partner the date your school year ends and whether you would like to continue the partnership next year. Re- register for the program, whether you are looking for a new partner or continuing with the same partnership. Any questions can be directed to the Program Coordinator at classroom@ptpi.org. Q. What safety precautions are taken? A. PTPI will not request or distribute personal information. The School & Classroom Program does not request, nor does it distribute, personal or residential addresses of teachers or students to other entities. A public address (for a school, church, gymnasium, etc.) is requested, and is exchanged only between teachers in a partnership. Parental Permission Form: A student’s parent or guardian completes a Parental Permission Form before PTPI may use student project work or photographs on its website or in its promotional materials. Only a student’s grade level, school name, city and/or country are published. No names or other identifying information about students will be used on the website or in promotional materials. A Parental Permission Form is available on page 33. Q. How can my class or school be featured in a PTPI publication? A. We would like to feature you in a publication! Submit updates, stories, and photographs to the Program Coordinator (classroom@ptpi.org). Remember to include signed Parental Permission Forms for photographs (see form on page 33). Q. What materials can partners exchange? A. Partners may exchange various project materials such as letters, photographs, audio and music files, etc. All materials must be appropriate in nature and exclude pornography, violence, and foul, hostile, discriminatory, or suggestive language or images. If you have a question or if you or your students receive inappropriate materials, contact the Program Coordinator immediately. Q. Do participants receive a certificate for participation? A. We would be happy to provide you with a Letter of Certification to confirm your participation in the School & Classroom Program. Please write to the Program Coordinator at classroom@ptpi.org to make your request. 26
  26. 26. This form should be filled out if you wish to have your students’ creative project work and/or photograph in connection with the School & Classroom Program on People to People International’s website or in its promotional materials. Dear Parent or Guardian, Your child has participated in an educational program named the School & Classroom Program, which is operated by People to People International (PTPI). The program is a free service that links classes and student groups in different countries for pen pal projects that encourage cross-cultural learning. PTPI, with World Headquarters in Kansas City, Missouri USA, was established by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower on September 11, 1956 to enhance international understanding and friendship through educational, cultural, and humanitarian activities involving the exchange of ideas and experiences directly among peoples of different countries and diverse cultures. People to People International (PTPI), an NGO with a U.S. not-for-profit, [501(c) (3)] tax rating, has reached more than 160 countries with people of all ages participating in our programs. PTPI is proud of the contribution that your student has made to the School & Classroom Program. We wish to gain permission to feature a photograph of your student or his or her project work on PTPI’s website or in promotional materials, which are distributed to inform the public about our organization. If we select a photograph that includes your child, then we will list ONLY his or her grade level, school name, city, and country; no personal names or other identifying information about your child will be used. Photographs including your child or his or her project work for the School & Classroom Program will qualify for use only if he or she, and you as his or her parent or guardian, have signed the following parental permission form. If you have any questions about the School & Classroom Program or your child's contribution to it, please contact the program coordinator at classroom@ptpi.org or +1.816.531.4701. I hereby grant People to People International (PTPI) the right to copy and display ______________________________’s creative project work and/or photograph in connection with the School & Classroom Program on People to People International’s website or in its promotional materials. Student name print ___________________________________________________________________________________ Parent or Guardian signature ______________________________________________ Date ________________________ Parent or Guardian name print _________________________________________________________________________ Email address _______________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing address ______________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ People to People International World Headquarters • School & Classroom Program 2405 Grand Boulevard, Suite 500 • Kansas City, MO 64108 USA • +1.816.531.4701 phone • +1.816.561.7502 fax • classroom@ptpi.org • www.ptpi.org Parental Permission Form 27
  27. 27. Registration is open July – October. Registrations received before or after this time will be held as pending until the registration period opens for the next school year or semester. We will contact you with details. • PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT Teacher/Supervisor Name_____________________________________________________________________________ School Name________________________________________________________________________________________ School Address (include country) in this space: Email Address _______________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone_______________________________________ Fax________________________________________________ Have you participated in this program before? Yes No If yes, when? ______________________________________ You may request partners for up to three classes. Requests for additional partners may be accepted once the initial partnerships are established. • NOTE: Provide information below only about classes you supervise that want partner classes. School Type (Please choose all that apply.) Primary/Elementary Middle Secondary Home School Languages spoken by students: _________________________________________________________________________ Curriculum General Language: ______________________ Other: _________________________________ Dates your school year begins and ends __________________________________________________________________ With which country would you like a partner class? Please select “no preference,” or list in order of preference three countries that interest you. By choosing "no preference" it is likely you will be matched more quickly. No preference 1) ______________________ 2) __________________________ 3) ___________________________ How do you want to communicate with another class? Please choose all that apply. Postal Service Email (Teacher account/student accounts –circle one or both) Other: _______________________________________ How did you learn about the School & Classroom Program? ________________________________________________ Please subscribe me to People to People International’s monthly E-Newsletter On Track. I want to receive PTPI event and travel announcements. People to People International World Headquarters • School & Classroom Program 2405 Grand Boulevard, Suite 500 • Kansas City, MO 64108 USA • +1.816.531.4701 phone • +1.816.561.7502 fax • classroom@ptpi.org • www.ptpi.org Registration Form CLASS ONE: Students’ grade level ________ Students’ ages ________ Number of students in the classroom________ CLASS THREE: Students’ grade level ________ Students’ ages ________ Number of students in the classroom ________ CLASS TWO: Students’ grade level ________ Students’ ages ________ Number of students in the classroom ________ Sharetheexperiencewith your colleagues! 28
  28. 28. Evaluations are important to People to People International (PTPI)! Your feedback ensures we are able to provide the most quality service possible. Please complete this form by July 1. Teachers with a PTPI membership will receive a certificate of program completion for their teaching portfolio upon receipt of this form. Not a member? Join today. The People to People International membership form can be found on the next page.This form is intended for teachers who maintained a partnership for the 2015-2016 school year. If you did not receive a partner or your partnership dissolved, please send concerns and feedback to us at classroom@ptpi.org. Your Name: _________________________________________________________________________________________ Your Partner Teacher’s Name(s): ________________________________________________________________________ Is this the first time you and your students have participated in an global collaboration project? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO Did your students feel connected to their partner class? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO After being matched and starting communication with your partner class, did you notice any effects on the students in your classroom? _____________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Did those effects spread beyond your classroom? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO Do you feel PTPI’s School & Classroom Program is better preparing your students for their future? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO Did you integrate additional global content into your curriculum this year? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO Are your students focused while working on global projects? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO Are your students more motivated or engaged when working with or writing to their partner class? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO If YES, how? _________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Does the School & Classroom Program support your state/nation’s education standards? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO Is the Program Manual a great resource for your classroom? ⃝ YES ⃝ NO Which project was the most impactful? __________________________________________________________________ How likely are you to recommend the School & Classroom Program to another teacher? NOT AT ALL LIKELY EXTREMELY LIKELY ⃝ 1 ⃝ 2 ⃝ 3 ⃝ 4 ⃝ 5 ⃝ 6 ⃝ 7 ⃝ 8 ⃝ 9 ⃝ 10 2015-2016 Evaluation 29
  29. 29. □ Student Membership (ages 12-18) $25 □ Individual Membership (ages 25+) $45 □ Family Membership (couples/families without students) $75 □ Supporting Membership Level $250 □ Sustaining Membership Level $1000 □ Corporate Membership Level $5000 Make a donation to help us keep the School & Classroom Program free to teachers in all countries. Donations to PTPI are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law as contribution to a not-for-profit organization. Please make checks payable to People to People International. Name: ____________________________ _____________ Date of Birth (mm/dd/yy): ___________________ For a Family or Family PLUS Membership, please list other members of household: Name(s): Email: Date of Birth: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ___________________________________________________________________________________________ City: ______ _________ State: Postal Code: _______________________ Province: Country:_______________________________________________________________ Day Phone: ______________ Evening Phone:___________________________________________ Email Address: ______________________________________________________________________________________ For Credit Card Payment: Cardholder’s Name: ________________ Security Code: _______________ Credit Card #: ______ Expiration Date: ____________________________ Billing address (if different from above): ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Your personal information is for PTPI use only and will not be disclosed to any third parties. People to People International World Headquarters • School & Classroom Program 2405 Grand Boulevard, Suite 500 • Kansas City, MO 64108 USA • +1.816.531.4701 phone • +1.816.561.7502 fax • classroom@ptpi.org • www.ptpi.org People to People International Membership Application $ ______ Membership Dues $ ______ Donation $ ______ Total Enclosed 30
  30. 30. Notes: Contact information for my partner teacher:
  31. 31. 2014 Global Youth Murals project winners

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