BEHAVIORAL FINANCE CHAPTER ELEVEN Practical Investment Management Robert A. Strong
Introduction <ul><li>There are three sub fields to modern financial research. </li></ul><ul><li>Theoretical finance  is th...
<ul><li>“ Financial economists have been aware for a long time that in laboratory settings, humans often make systematic m...
<ul><li>Behavioral finance research focuses on </li></ul><ul><li>How investors make decisions to buy and  </li></ul><ul><l...
Established Behaviors <ul><li>Representativeness Heuristic </li></ul><ul><li>The representativeness heuristic takes one ch...
Representativeness Heuristic Insert Table 11-1 here. Read the information and give your best assessment
Representativeness Heuristic Insert Figure 11-1 here.
<ul><li>Loss Aversion </li></ul><ul><li>Investors do not like losses and often engage in mental gymnastics to reduce their...
<ul><li>Fear of Regret </li></ul><ul><li>Investors do not like to make mistakes.  </li></ul><ul><li>People tend to feel so...
<ul><li>Myopic Loss Aversion </li></ul><ul><li>Investors have a tendency to assign too much importance to routine daily fl...
<ul><li>Herding </li></ul><ul><li>Herding refers to the lemming-like behavior of investors and analysts looking around, se...
<ul><li>Anchoring </li></ul><ul><li>Reflects the use of irrelevant information as a reference for evaluating or estimating...
<ul><li>Illusion of Control </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to people’s belief that they have influence over the outcome of uncon...
<ul><li>Prospect Theory </li></ul><ul><li>Risk averse investors get increasing utility from higher levels of wealth, but a...
Prospect Theory Insert Table 11-2 here.
Prospect Theory Insert Figure 11-2 here. Typical Utility Function
Prospect Theory Insert Figure 11-3 here. Prospect Utility Function
<ul><li>Mental Accounting </li></ul><ul><li>Mental accounting refers to our tendency to “put things in boxes” and track th...
<ul><li>Asset Segregation </li></ul><ul><li>Asset segregation refers to our tendency to look at investment decisions indiv...
Asset Segregation Decision I Decision II 25% chance of a $1,000 gain 75% chance of no gain B Sure gain of $240 A 25% chanc...
Asset Segregation Insert Table 11-3 here. <ul><li>Combined selections reflect tendency to look at each  </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Hindsight Bias </li></ul><ul><li>Hindsight bias refers to our tendency to remember positive outcomes and repress n...
<ul><li>Overconfidence </li></ul><ul><li>Overconfidence refers to our tendency to believe that certain things are more lik...
<ul><li>Framing </li></ul><ul><li>The concept of framing involves attempts to overlay a situation with an implied sense of...
<ul><li>Availability Heuristic </li></ul><ul><li>The availability heuristic is the contention that things that are easier ...
<ul><li>Illusion of Truth </li></ul><ul><li>People tend to believe things that are easier to understand more readily than ...
<ul><li>Biased Expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Our  prior experience  causes us to anticipate certain relationships or char...
<ul><li>Reference Dependence </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;That stock was $80 last year, now it's trading at $20 - so it's got t...
Mistaken Statistics <ul><li>There are some other tendencies that may have a behavioral influence on asset values. </li></u...
<ul><li>The Special Nature of Round Numbers </li></ul>Mistaken Statistics <ul><li>Given a giant lottery wheel with numbers...
<ul><li>Extrapolation </li></ul><ul><li>We have a tendency to assume that the past will repeat itself and to give too much...
<ul><li>Percentages vs. Numbers </li></ul><ul><li>Many people process numbers and percentages differently </li></ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>Sample Size </li></ul><ul><li>There are many instances where people draw incorrect inferences from statistical dat...
<ul><li>Apparent Order </li></ul><ul><li>A single occurrence of an unlikely event becomes much more likely as the sample s...
<ul><li>Regression to the Mean </li></ul><ul><li>The regression to the mean concept states that given a series of random, ...
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  1. 1. BEHAVIORAL FINANCE CHAPTER ELEVEN Practical Investment Management Robert A. Strong
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>There are three sub fields to modern financial research. </li></ul><ul><li>Theoretical finance is the study of logical relationships among assets. </li></ul><ul><li>Empirical finance deals with the study of data in order to infer relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Behavioral finance integrates psychology into the investment process. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>“ Financial economists have been aware for a long time that in laboratory settings, humans often make systematic mistakes and choices that cannot be explained by traditional models of choice under uncertainty.” </li></ul><ul><li>– Paul Pfleiderer </li></ul><ul><li>Amos Tversky, Daniel Kahneman, Werner Debondt, Richard Thaler, and Meir Statman have contributed greatly to the behavioral finance literature. </li></ul><ul><li>Daniel Kahneman won the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economics “for having integrated insights from psychological research into economic science, especially concerning human judgement and decision-making under uncertainty. </li></ul>Introduction
  4. 4. <ul><li>Behavioral finance research focuses on </li></ul><ul><li>How investors make decisions to buy and </li></ul><ul><li>sell securities </li></ul><ul><li>How they choose between alternatives </li></ul><ul><li>Comparison: Behavioral finance tries to discover how humans actually make decisions and form judgments (including emotions and cognitive errors), while traditional theoretical finance tries to figure out how rational investors would behave (focusing on logic). </li></ul>Introduction
  5. 5. Established Behaviors <ul><li>Representativeness Heuristic </li></ul><ul><li>The representativeness heuristic takes one characteristic of a company and extends it to other aspects of the firm. </li></ul><ul><li>Representativeness is a cognitive heuristic in which decisions are made based on how representative a given individual case appears to be independent of other information about its actual likelihood. </li></ul><ul><li>In particular, many investors believe a well-run company represents a good investment. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ If it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck” </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Representativeness Heuristic Insert Table 11-1 here. Read the information and give your best assessment
  7. 7. Representativeness Heuristic Insert Figure 11-1 here.
  8. 8. <ul><li>Loss Aversion </li></ul><ul><li>Investors do not like losses and often engage in mental gymnastics to reduce their psychological impact </li></ul><ul><li>Loss aversion reflects the tendency for people to weigh losses significantly more heavily than gains </li></ul><ul><li>Loss aversion can be observed in our tendency, when faced with a choice between a sure loss and an uncertain gamble, to gamble unless the odds are strongly against us </li></ul><ul><li>Their tendency to sell a winning stock rather than a losing stock is called the disposition effect in some of the behavioral finance literature. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Meir Statman and I (Shefrin and Statman 1985) coined the term disposition effect , as shorthand for the predisposition toward get-evenitis .&quot; </li></ul></ul>Established Behaviors
  9. 9. <ul><li>Fear of Regret </li></ul><ul><li>Investors do not like to make mistakes. </li></ul><ul><li>People tend to feel sorrow and grief after having made an error in judgment. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Makes people slow to act (unable to decide) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>One theory is that investors avoid selling stocks that have gone down in order to avoid the pain and regret of having made a bad investment. </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  10. 10. <ul><li>Myopic Loss Aversion </li></ul><ul><li>Investors have a tendency to assign too much importance to routine daily fluctuations in the market. (i.e. be shortsighted) </li></ul><ul><li>Abandoning a long-term investment program because of normal market behavior is sub optimal behavior. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Checking on investment portfolio frequently can lead to loss of discipline in adherence to a well thought out long term investment plan and lead to buy high and sell low trading </li></ul></ul>Established Behaviors
  11. 11. <ul><li>Herding </li></ul><ul><li>Herding refers to the lemming-like behavior of investors and analysts looking around, seeing what each other is doing, and heading in that direction. </li></ul><ul><li>Herding reflects the feeling of safety and well being by behaving in harmony with the group. </li></ul><ul><li>As many recent financial disasters show (Enron, Worldcom), there may not have been safety in numbers, but there probably was some comfort in them. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I lost money but at least I had company” </li></ul></ul>Established Behaviors
  12. 12. <ul><li>Anchoring </li></ul><ul><li>Reflects the use of irrelevant information as a reference for evaluating or estimating some unknown value or information </li></ul><ul><li>When anchoring, people base decisions or estimates on events or values that are known to them, even though these facts may have no bearing on the actual event or values </li></ul><ul><li>In the context of investing, investors will tend to hang on to losing investments by waiting for the investment to &quot;break even&quot;  with the price at which it was purchased. Thus, these investors anchor the value of their investment to the value it once had, even though it has no relevance to its current valuation </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  13. 13. <ul><li>Illusion of Control </li></ul><ul><li>Refers to people’s belief that they have influence over the outcome of uncontrollable events </li></ul>Established Behaviors <ul><li>Example: We like to pretend that we can influence the resulting dice roll by varying the force with which we throw a dice. (Hard – High, Gentle – Low) </li></ul><ul><li>Similarly, investors like to look at charts, although charts are theoretically not helpful in predicting the future prospects for a stock. </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>Prospect Theory </li></ul><ul><li>Risk averse investors get increasing utility from higher levels of wealth, but at a decreasing rate. </li></ul><ul><li>Research (by Kahneman and Tversky) shows that while risk aversion may accurately describe investor behavior with gains, investors often show risk seeking behavior when they face a loss. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I can’t quit now, I am too far down” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Implication: Money managers may take bigger chances when things have not gone their way in an attempt to recover the losses </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  15. 15. Prospect Theory Insert Table 11-2 here.
  16. 16. Prospect Theory Insert Figure 11-2 here. Typical Utility Function
  17. 17. Prospect Theory Insert Figure 11-3 here. Prospect Utility Function
  18. 18. <ul><li>Mental Accounting </li></ul><ul><li>Mental accounting refers to our tendency to “put things in boxes” and track them individually. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, investors tend to differentiate between dividend and capital (gain) dollars, and between realized and unrealized gains. </li></ul><ul><li>Investment Example: The practice of buying dividend-paying stocks so that one can avoid &quot;dipping into capital&quot; - selling stock - to pay for life's necessities. </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  19. 19. <ul><li>Asset Segregation </li></ul><ul><li>Asset segregation refers to our tendency to look at investment decisions individually rather than as part of a group. </li></ul><ul><li>The portfolio may be up handsomely for the reporting period, but the investor will still be concerned about the individual holdings that did not perform well. </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  20. 20. Asset Segregation Decision I Decision II 25% chance of a $1,000 gain 75% chance of no gain B Sure gain of $240 A 25% chance of no loss 75% chance of losing $1,000 D Sure loss of $750 C
  21. 21. Asset Segregation Insert Table 11-3 here. <ul><li>Combined selections reflect tendency to look at each </li></ul><ul><li>decision independently from the other </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>Hindsight Bias </li></ul><ul><li>Hindsight bias refers to our tendency to remember positive outcomes and repress negative outcomes. </li></ul><ul><li>Investors remember when their pet trading strategy turned up roses, but do not dwell on the numerous times the strategy failed. </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  23. 23. <ul><li>Overconfidence </li></ul><ul><li>Overconfidence refers to our tendency to believe that certain things are more likely than they really are. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, most investors think they are above-average stock pickers. </li></ul><ul><li>Money managers, advisors, and investors are consistently overconfident in their ability to outperform the market, however, most fail to do so. </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  24. 24. <ul><li>Framing </li></ul><ul><li>The concept of framing involves attempts to overlay a situation with an implied sense of gain or loss. </li></ul><ul><li>It is easier to pay $3,400 for something that you expected to cost $3,300 than it is to pay $100 for something you expected to be free. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic impact is $100 for both cases </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ A loss seems less painful when it is an increment to a larger loss than when it is considered alone.” - Daniel Kahneman </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  25. 25. <ul><li>Availability Heuristic </li></ul><ul><li>The availability heuristic is the contention that things that are easier to remember are thought to be more common. </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  26. 26. <ul><li>Illusion of Truth </li></ul><ul><li>People tend to believe things that are easier to understand more readily than things that are more complicated. </li></ul><ul><li>Most investors prefer a low PE ratio, since they prefer to buy low-priced stocks with high earnings, and this idea is easy to understand </li></ul><ul><li>Some people believe that stock splits and cash dividends are wealth-enhancing events, even when we know that these corporate events do not affect shareholder wealth at all. </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  27. 27. <ul><li>Biased Expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Our prior experience causes us to anticipate certain relationships or characteristics that may not apply outside our frame of reference </li></ul><ul><li>Example: A stock sells at a price of $1.12 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Investor in US may infer that it is a risky, young company, that pays no dividends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>But in Japan a lot of companies trade at an equivalent dollar price of $1.12 or so </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Closer to home example: This is a utility stock </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An Investor may assume that it is a conservative and safe investment with high dividend yield </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How about if that utility stock was Enron? </li></ul></ul>Established Behaviors
  28. 28. <ul><li>Reference Dependence </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;That stock was $80 last year, now it's trading at $20 - so it's got to be cheap.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>This is known as reference dependence , and it's the tendency to focus on some point of reference. </li></ul><ul><li>Investment decisions seem to be affected by an investor's reference point. If a certain stock was once trading for $20, then dropped to $5 and finally recovered to $10, the investor's propensity to increase holdings of this stock will depend on whether the previous purchase was made at $20 or $5. </li></ul>Established Behaviors
  29. 29. Mistaken Statistics <ul><li>There are some other tendencies that may have a behavioral influence on asset values. </li></ul><ul><li>These involve “innumeracy” or a misunderstanding of the likeliness of an event or series of events. </li></ul>
  30. 30. <ul><li>The Special Nature of Round Numbers </li></ul>Mistaken Statistics <ul><li>Given a giant lottery wheel with numbers from one to one thousand, many of us would find a random outcome like 287 to be more reasonable than the “unusual” outcome of 1,000. </li></ul><ul><li>Similarly, investors tend to make disproportionate use of round numbers when placing stop or limit orders. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Place a stop price at $25 rather than $25.16 </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. <ul><li>Extrapolation </li></ul><ul><li>We have a tendency to assume that the past will repeat itself and to give too much weight to recent experience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Some investors believe that because a stock has risen in the past recently it will continue doing so in the future </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A belief that recent occurrences influence the next outcome in a sequence of independent events is known as the gambler’s fallacy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Craps example: A shooter has a “hot hand” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sports example: The player is “in a zone” </li></ul></ul>Mistaken Statistics
  32. 32. <ul><li>Percentages vs. Numbers </li></ul><ul><li>Many people process numbers and percentages differently </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Version A: The incidence of a disease rose 30% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Version B: The incidence of a disease rose from 10 in a million to 13 in a million </li></ul></ul><ul><li>We would likely find that to many people, 3 more cases is not a cause for concern, although a 30% increase is </li></ul>Mistaken Statistics
  33. 33. <ul><li>Sample Size </li></ul><ul><li>There are many instances where people draw incorrect inferences from statistical data </li></ul><ul><li>Small sample problem: Thinking that a few observations can lead towards a meaningful inference, when it may not mean anything. The mistake is compounded when the sample is biased </li></ul><ul><li>Even in large samples, statistical significance does not mean that it is important or interesting </li></ul>Mistaken Statistics
  34. 34. <ul><li>Apparent Order </li></ul><ul><li>A single occurrence of an unlikely event becomes much more likely as the sample size increases. </li></ul><ul><li>However, many people will find a run of six consecutive numbers in a daily state lottery extremely unlikely </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There is nothing special about outcomes that have an “apparent order” </li></ul></ul>Mistaken Statistics
  35. 35. <ul><li>Regression to the Mean </li></ul><ul><li>The regression to the mean concept states that given a series of random, independent data observations, an unusual occurrence tends to be followed by a more ordinary event </li></ul><ul><li>Investments Interpretation: Good performance tends to be followed by lesser results. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hence, chasing last year’s mutual fund or stock with the best performance is likely to be a losing strategy, although many investors do precisely this </li></ul></ul>Mistaken Statistics

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