Managing Environmental     and Social Impacts    of Local Companies A Response Guide and Toolkit
AcknowledgmentsThis Response Guide and Toolkit was prepared by the World Bank Institute (WBI)Finance and Private Sector De...
World Bank), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), which joined the Foundation inApril 2002, as well as 41 African countr...
The AIDS Business Coalition TanzaniaThe AIDS Business Coalition Tanzania (ABCT) is a coalition of Tanzanian employers whoh...
Associação dos Empresários Contra o SIDA (ECOSIDA)The Mozambique Business Coalition Against HIV/AIDSThe mission of EcoSIDA...
Table of Contents         Introduction                                                  6         Framework for Business A...
IntroductionEvery company has the power and ability to reduce their negative impacts on theenvironment and positively bene...
The diagram shows the relation between the companies’ economic, social andenvironmental performance issues and responsibil...
as their financial impacts, in their workforce management, investment, and productionsdecisions.Businesses are now operati...
* Some of these costs and benefits were adapted from (1) Environmental ManagementSystems: A Design for the Environment App...
practical tools that can help your company to plan, organize, report on, and follow itsenvironmental and social responses....
Framework for Business Action on Environmental and Social ResponseThe following framework includes typical components of a...
•   External communication & marketing of environmental & social responses•   Development of partnerships with civil socie...
Part 1.Environmental and Social Leadership Commitment                                                 13
Steps for ActionLeadership building is a dynamic process that needs to extend across your company.In environmental and soc...
□ Step 1. Build Environmental and Social Response Commitment in your     CompanyUnderstand the business case for environme...
International Finance Corporation, Sustainability:http://www.ifc.org/ifcext/sustainability.nsf/Content/HomeInternational L...
□ Step 2. Demonstrate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response     CommitmentEven before you start an environmenta...
□ Step 3. Communicate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response     CommitmentThe formal commitment to address envi...
□ Step 4. Continuously Demonstrate your Company’s Environmental and Social     CommitmentLong-term demonstration of commit...
Part 1.Resources Section                    20
Step 1. Build Environmental and Social Response Commitment in your Company        1.1 Company Management Survey on Environ...
7. What types of technical guidance do you need to develop your environmental   and social response?   ___________________...
*Some of these questions were adapted from (1) Environmental Management Systems:A Design for the Environment Approach, U.S...
Step 2. Demonstrate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response Commitment1.2 Model Environmental and Social Commitme...
Step 3. Communicate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response Commitment1.3 How to Communicate Your Environmental a...
External Communication:Who are your external audiences (government officials, customers, the localcommunity, buyers, etc.)...
Part 2.Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in the Workplace and      or Environmental and Soci...
Steps for ActionEnvironmental and Social Focal Points are typically people in your company. Forexample, Focal Points can b...
A.      □ Step 1. Decide the Types of Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places, and        Target Areas to Develop Wh...
Focal Point and or Committee will become an effective guiding force for organizing andimplementing environmental and socia...
□ Step 2. Assign the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in your CompanyThis step is to officially recognize selected p...
□ Step 3. Describe the Activities and Purposes of the Focal Points, Places, and     Target AreasThe environmental and soci...
□ Step 4. Continuously Strengthen the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas and     the CommitteeJust like with other Env...
Part 2.Resources Section                    34
Step 1. Decide the Types of Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places and TargetAreas to develop and engage Management...
Step 2. Assign the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in your Company and SelectEnvironmental and Social Committee Mem...
Focal Places:                     Location                                    Reason1234Add more locations, as you require...
Step 2. Assign the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in your Company and SelectEnvironmental and Social Committee Mem...
I hereby support the above individuals as members of our company’s Environmental andSocial Committee.Name_________________...
Step 3. Describe the Activities and Purposes of the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areasand describe the Environmental a...
Step 3. Describe the Activities and Purposes of the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areasand describe the Environmental a...
2. Committee ManagementMembers are elected by ___________________________. Each member is assigned bymanagement, and his/h...
Step 4. Continuously Strengthen the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas andStrengthen the Environmental and Social Comm...
Develop your Partnerships     Identify partners and other    A list of partners andand Community Relations       organizat...
Part 3.        Environmental and Social Response Planning and Strategizing:Environmental and Social Issues Capabilities As...
Steps for ActionIt is important to understand the environmental and social issues that are relevant toyour company. Then, ...
□ Step 1. Conduct an Environmental Self-AssessmentA.   Identify Environmental Issues Affecting your CompanyB.   Identify E...
Environmental       o   Does your company have an organized management structure for addressing           environmental is...
□ Group Discussion: Use the questions below to further discuss how to best  use/access resource to assist environmental re...
□ Step 2: Conduct a Social Self-AssessmentA.   Identify Social and Community Issues Affecting your CompanyB.   Identify So...
o Does you company have an internal and external awareness-raising and         communication plan for key social and commu...
□ What resources can your company contribute to its Social Response  Program? Think of resources already existing in your ...
Community ActivitiesCommunity activities stem from your company’s involvement in society at local,national, regional, and ...
Part 3 i.Environmental Resources Section                                  54
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(A)3.1 i Identifying Priority Environmental Issues in your CompanyThis re...
responses?             Leaders and top management in the             company             All employees and staff          ...
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(A)3.2 i Group ExchangeThere are many environmental issues and activities...
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(B)3.3 i Company Environmental Self-AssessmentCompany OperationsThis reso...
How oftenThis procedure is repeated annually to ensure that any new environmental, health, andsafety issues are identified...
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(B)3.4 i Basic and Supporting OperationsUse the space below to identify t...
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(B)3.5 i Input/Output DiagramsRecord your input/output flows of materials...
Can you draw an input/output diagram for a part of your company’s operations?Think of an important part.           Product...
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(C)3.6 i Company Environmental Self-AssessmentThink more about the enviro...
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(C)3.7 i Health, Safety, and Potential Environmental ConcernsIf an operat...
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(C)3.8 i Exposure to Chemicals and MaterialsIf an operation involves use ...
Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(D)3.9 i Company Environmental Self-Assessment Company CapabilitiesLeader...
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  1. 1. Managing Environmental and Social Impacts of Local Companies A Response Guide and Toolkit
  2. 2. AcknowledgmentsThis Response Guide and Toolkit was prepared by the World Bank Institute (WBI)Finance and Private Sector Development Division Business, Competitiveness andDevelopment (BCD) Program, with support from the African Capacity BuildingFoundation (ACBF) and the Norwegian and Finnish Governments through a World BankTrust Fund for Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development (TF-ESSD), andwith input from the Danish Ministry of Economics and Business Affairs Commerce andCompanies Agency (DCCA) Centre for CSR. Parts of this resource were adapted and/ortaken from the DCCA “People and Profit: A Practical Guide to Corporate SocialResponsibility” publication.The Response Guide and Toolkit team was led by Amina El-Sharkawy (WBI), Jenny Gold(WBI) and Caroline Grunewald (WBI), in collaboration with George Oumo (EnterpriseUganda), and Martin Imalingat (Enterprise Uganda). Overall guidance was provided byDjordjija Petkoski (WBI), Edwin Forlemu (ACBF), and Ernest Etti (ACBF). The team alsoreceived valuable input from consultations with the Danish International DevelopmentAssistance (DANIDA) office in Uganda, and local companies and organizations in Uganda,Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia and Mozambique.WBI Business, Competitiveness, and Development (BCD) ProgramThe BCD Program works directly with the private and public sectors and their keystakeholders to integrate social and environmental responsibility, good governance,accountability, and transparency as vital components of corporate strategy, and toimplement responsible approaches for enhanced economic competitiveness at the firm,sector, and country level.www.developmentandbusiness.orgThe African Capacity Building FoundationThe African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), based in Harare, Zimbabwe, is anindependent, capacity-building institution established in 1991 through the collaborativeefforts of the African Development Bank (AfDB), the World Bank, and the UnitedNations Development Programme (UNDP)), African governments and bilateral donors.The current membership comprises the three sponsoring agencies (AfDB, UNDP and the
  3. 3. World Bank), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), which joined the Foundation inApril 2002, as well as 41 African countries and non-African countries and institutions.The establishment of ACBF was a response to the severity of Africas capacity problemand the challenge to invest in indigenous human capital and institutions in sub-SaharanAfrica.http://www.acbf-pact.org/Enterprise UgandaEnterprise Uganda aims at promoting private sector development and contributingindirectly to poverty reduction through the creation of new business ventures as well asbuilding the competitiveness of existing small and medium enterprises (SMEs). TheseSMEs will in turn contribute significantly to the creation of employment opportunitiesand the diversification of the Uganda economy.http://www.enterprise.co.ugCenter for Corporate GovernanceThe Center for Corporate Governance (CCG), formerly the Private Sector CorporateGovernance Trust, based in Nairobi, Kenya, was established as the Private SectorInitiative for Corporate Governance in 1999. CCG is an independent, not-for-profitorganization. The Centre is affiliated with the Commonwealth Association for CorporateGovernance (CACG). The values upon which CCG was founded and which guide itsoperations are to act in the best interest of society in promoting effective and efficientuse of resources, in a manner based on accountability, integrity, responsibility andtransparency.http://www.ccg.or.ke 2
  4. 4. The AIDS Business Coalition TanzaniaThe AIDS Business Coalition Tanzania (ABCT) is a coalition of Tanzanian employers whohave come together to fight HIV/AIDS at the workplace. ABCT is currently expanding itsmission to include a broader range of social and environmental issues. ABCT serves as aresource center, offers trainings, and acts as a pressure group. ABCT is run by aManagement Board consisting of 12 member companies: Coca cola Kwanza, TwigaCement, NBC Bank, Swiss Port, National Social Security Fund (NSSF), Unilever Tea,Scania, Mwananchi Communication, Holliday Inn Hotel, Standard Chartered Bank,Delloitte & Touché, Tanzania Cigarette Company (TCC).http://www.abctz.org/The Ethiopian Business Coalition Against AIDSThe Ethiopian Business Coalition on AIDS (EBCA), established in 2004, aims to respondto the challenges of HIV/AIDS in the workplace. The Coalition seeks to transform thebusiness response to HIV/AIDS, promoting HIV prevention, care and treatmentprograms for the workplace and innovative partnerships with governments and civilsociety. EBCA is currently expanding its mission to include a broader range of social andenvironmental issues in its programming.http://www.ebca-hiv.org/home.htm 3
  5. 5. Associação dos Empresários Contra o SIDA (ECOSIDA)The Mozambique Business Coalition Against HIV/AIDSThe mission of EcoSIDA, which was established in 2005, is for all formally registeredcompanies to embark on the Road Map designed by EcoSIDA, to fight HIV/AIDS in theworkplace, and that they execute the steps of the Road Map according to best practice,within the mutually agreed timings. ECOSIDA is currently expanding its mission toinclude a broader range of social and environmental issues in its programming.http://www.gbcimpact.org/live/involved/connections/mozambique.phpCentre for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Danish Commerce and CompaniesAgency, Ministry of Economics and Business Affairs – Government of DenmarkThe Danish Commerce and Companies Agency (DCCA) is an Agency under the Ministerof Economic and Business Affairs. The DCCA is the official place of registration for Danishbusinesses. In parallel, the DCCA administers legislation regulating businesses, theCompanies Act and the Company Accounts Act, among others. Registration andpublication of business information favors the free market and provides businesses withgood basic conditions. An easy and quick access to registration and an effective butflexible administration of the legislation is at the same time the basis of the DCCA´simportant role in the national effort to reduce the administrative burdens. 4
  6. 6. Table of Contents Introduction 6 Framework for Business Action 11Part 1 Environmental and Social Leadership Commitment 13 Steps for Action 14 Part 1 Resources Section 20Part 2 Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places, and Target 27 Areas in the Workplace and or Environmental and Social Workplace Committee for larger companies Steps for Action 28 Part 2 Resources Section 34Part 3 Environmental and Social Response Planning and 45 Strategizing: Environmental and Social Issues Capabilities Assessment and Situation Analysis Steps for Action 46 Part 3i Resources Section (Environmental) 54 Part 3ii Resources Section (Social) 69Part 4 Environmental and Social Policy Development 79 Steps for Action 80 Part 4 Resources Section 87 Generic Environmental and Social Policy 89Part 5 Environmental and Social Response Planning and 98 Strategizing: Environmental and Social Response Action Planning Steps for Action 99 Part 5 Resources Section 102Part 6 Environmental and Social Reporting 108 Steps for Action 109 Part 6 Resources Section 118 Road Map for Business Action on Environmental Issues 137 Road Map for Business Action on Social Issues 143 Appendix 149 5
  7. 7. IntroductionEvery company has the power and ability to reduce their negative impacts on theenvironment and positively benefit their communities.What is an Environmental and Social Response?Definition: The policies, strategies, and actions taken by companies to addressenvironmental and social issues in the workplace, and among their customers, partners,and broader community.A Company Has Many Environmental and Social Impacts – Positive and Negative…..Examples of environmental and social impacts of business include: Environmental SocialAs a producer, a company has an impact As an employer, a company has an impacton its environment (e.g. through pollution on the lives of its employees (e.g. provisionand effluent, use/misuse/overuse of water of health services; mainstreaming genderand energy resources, misuse/overuse of and equal opportunity into the workplace;land and natural resources. occupational health and safety standards; treatment of migrant labor).As a consumer of raw materials, a As a neighbor, a company interacts withcompany has an impact on its physical other businesses and families which areenvironment (e.g. contamination of located in their community (e.g.drinking water, desertification, and awareness raising and educationaldegradation of land). campaigns; foundations for community projects and schools; contribution to conflict and land disputes; use/misuse of public goods, such as lake or river water).As an operation, a company has an impact By creating jobs and providing income, aon its community (e.g. odor; human, company contributes to the economicanimal, and plant effects from toxins and development of a communityhazardous wastes; indoor air quality; (contribution to wealth disparity;smog) addressing youth unemployment; raising standards of living).As a role model, an environmentally A company can act as an example of goodresponsible business can be an example of practice (e.g. human rights, culturalgood practice (e.g. waste management, diversity).use of alternative energy). 6
  8. 8. The diagram shows the relation between the companies’ economic, social andenvironmental performance issues and responsibilities.Source: UNIDOFor further information on the business case, please view Peter Raynard and MayaForstater and staff of UNIDO’s Small and Medium Enterprises Branch. Corporate SocialResponsibility: Implications for Small and Medium Enterprises in Developing Countries.United Nations Industrial Development Organization. Vienna, 2002Why is an Environmental and Social Response Program Important?The business environment has changed dramatically over the past few decades, andbusinesses must manage these changes. A business cannot limit itself to its financialimpact alone. Businesses not only contribute to employment and economic growth, butthey also impact the environment and the communities in which they operate.Increasingly, businesses must consider their environmental and social impacts, as well 7
  9. 9. as their financial impacts, in their workforce management, investment, and productionsdecisions.Businesses are now operating under new conditions, risks, market and stakeholderpressures, and challenges that they must consider and respond to in order to remainviable and stay competitive. This new business environment affects large, medium, andsmall companies through new export requirements and supply chain standards,community pressures, and responses from the media. New and emerging compliancestandards, as well as environmental, governance, and social (health, communityrelations, labor, and human rights) standards are being required by buyers, consumers,and governments.What are the Costs and Benefits to Businesses?All businesses, regardless of size, can benefit from developing and followingenvironmental and social policies. Some of these benefits include: □ Lower costs in the long-term (cost-savings on electricity bills; reduced fines for non-compliance or pollution/dumping; healthy, reliable, and skilled workforce). □ Increased revenues (expanded consumer base; more money to invest in marketing; greater output). □ Reduced operational risk (reduced occupational hazards; stronger community relations). □ Stimulated innovation (ability to hire more employees; ability to invest in new capital; new technologies). □ Increased access to markets (niche markets; broader customer appeal; compliance with international standards). □ Improved reputation (become known as a “good” company; pillar of the community; quality and integrity of products and services). □ Improved access to finance, capital, and resources (some banks look at environmental and social performance on financing applications; partnership opportunities leads to access to financial and in-kind resources).There are also, of course, some costs involved with the development andimplementation of environmental and social responses in a company. Some of theseinclude: □ Staff/employee time (information collection; understand the policy and operational response; Focal Points and or Environmental and Social Committee responsibilities). □ Technical resources to analyze environmental and social impacts and improvement options. □ Training of new employees and personnel. □ Possible external assistance (consultant; environmental or systems engineer; NGO). □ Resources required to make the changes 8
  10. 10. * Some of these costs and benefits were adapted from (1) Environmental ManagementSystems: A Design for the Environment Approach, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency;Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, March 1999, and (2) EnvironmentalManagement Systems: An Implementation Guide for Small and Medium-SizedOrganizations. Ann Arbor, MI: NSF International, November 1996.Focus of this ManualThis Manual is to help your company get organized and started on its Environmental andSocial Response Program. This Manual can be used as a practical guide or as a trainingresource. The materials offer concrete Steps for Action, as well as Resources, to assistyour company in developing a customized Environmental and Social Response Program.The Manual was developed based on consultations with businesses, these businesses’experiences, and national and international good practices.Getting Started and Organized: Management of the Environmental and SocialResponse ProgramWithout a strong initiation, preparation, and guidance for implementation, theEnvironmental and Social Response Program is unlikely to achieve its ultimate goal ofmitigating risk to and negative effects on your company, your workforce, and yourcommunity. In this priority area, your company develops and organizes themanagement of its Environmental and Social Response Program through leadershipcommitment, planning and strategizing, the establishment of Focal Points in theworkplace and or Environmental and Social Committees for larger companies,developing an Environmental and Social Response Policy and plan for action, andestablishing reporting practices for the company’s environmental and social response.This Manual is divided into six parts: • Part 1 is on developing environmental and social leadership commitment in your company. • Part 2 is a guide to establishing focal points, places, and target areas in the workplace and a guide to forming an environmental and social committee for larger companies. • Part 3 is on environmental and social situation analysis and capabilities assessment for accurate response planning and strategizing in your company. • Part 4 presents steps to develop a company environmental and social policy. • Part 5 is on developing an action plan for environmental and social response in your company. • Part 6 is on environmental and social reporting in your company.At the end of the Manual, you will find a Road Map for Business Action onEnvironmental Issues and a Road Map for Business Action on Social Issues. These are 9
  11. 11. practical tools that can help your company to plan, organize, report on, and follow itsenvironmental and social responses. 10
  12. 12. Framework for Business Action on Environmental and Social ResponseThe following framework includes typical components of a company levelenvironmental and social response. The content was developed based on a review ofexisting experiences and recommendations from local companies and partners in EastAfrica, collected in consultations held between 2006 and 2008. The consultationsshared good practices, challenges and lessons learnt by local companies in regards tomanaging environmental and social impacts.The framework can serve as a working resource to guide planning and learning fordeveloping an environmental and social response program in a company. The activities(or ‘program items’) in the framework can serve as examples of goals and/or choices toplan as components of your company’s environmental and social response. Companiesmay also think of other innovative actions to address environmental and social issues inthe context of their business. The framework is only a starting point to think about howto take action. Step-by-step, a company can learn about priority environmental andsocial issues, possible responses to these issues and relevant good practices for aneffective response. They can then plan how to take actions that fit the company.This working framework is a resource developed to guide the environmental and socialresponse of a company. Management of the Program • Leadership commitment and training • Environmental and social focal points and or environmental and social committee in the workplace • Environmental and social planning and strategizing • Environmental and social policy development in the company • Company reporting on environmental and social issues Implementation • Internal communication & awareness-raising • Training & education for behavioral change • Mainstreaming of environmental practices to reduce, re-use, re-design & recycle resources in the workplace • Provide health & social assistance programs & services in the workplace Business Linkages, Market Development & Extending the Program • Analysis of business networks & supply chain 11
  13. 13. • External communication & marketing of environmental & social responses• Development of partnerships with civil society, community groups, government, business groups & other companies• Community relations & outreach activities• Fund-raising and/or social fund development Documentation & Assessment• Documentation of environmental & social responses in a manual or resource guide• Write a case study• Monitoring & reporting of benchmarks, performance audits and checklists• Impact assessments, workplace studies, life cycle analysis, cost/benefit analysis• Regular review & improvement of the company’s response• Regular reporting to leadership 12
  14. 14. Part 1.Environmental and Social Leadership Commitment 13
  15. 15. Steps for ActionLeadership building is a dynamic process that needs to extend across your company.In environmental and social response program organization, as well as throughoutenvironmental and social response program development in your company, owners,board members, management, and employees need to commit to take action onenvironmental and social issues. Moreover, this commitment needs to bedemonstrated and communicated to all employees and staff at all levels in yourcompany, as well as external partners, such as customers.Below are Steps for Action to help you develop Environmental and Social LeadershipCommitment in your company: Step 1. Build Environmental and Social Response Commitment in your Company Step 2. Demonstrate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response Commitment Step 3. Communicate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response Commitment Step 4. Continuously Demonstrate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response Commitment 14
  16. 16. □ Step 1. Build Environmental and Social Response Commitment in your CompanyUnderstand the business case for environmental and social response:This can help senior management and leaders in your company to commit toenvironmental and social response. They can learn about environmental and socialissues affecting your company, the impacts that these environmental and social issuescan have on business, the workforce, and the community, as well as effectiveenvironmental and social response strategies.Materials on environmental and social issues and their impacts on business are availablefrom many sources, including your business association, the Internet, and local resourcecenters. Review publications on environmental and social issues and their impact on your business. Train your company’s managers on these issues, and how to mainstream responses into strategy and daily operations. Share experiences with other companies. Learn about the costs and benefits of environmental and social response development for your company.Useful websites to start your learning:Below is a list of useful web sites to help you learn more about addressingenvironmental and social issues and the business case for action. This list should not beconsidered exhaustive, but rather as a valuable starting point for your learning.Business Action for Africa: http://www.businessactionforafrica.org/Business and Sustainable Development, A Global Guide: http://www.bsdglobal.com/Corporate Council on Africa: http://www.africacncl.org/CSR Quest: http://www.csrquest.net/Global Business Coalition on HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria:http://www.gbcimpact.org/Global Environment Facility: http://www.gefweb.org/default.aspxIf People, NGO Guide to Tools for CSR:http://www.ifpeople.net/learn/resources/sustainability/tools 15
  17. 17. International Finance Corporation, Sustainability:http://www.ifc.org/ifcext/sustainability.nsf/Content/HomeInternational Labor Organization, Resource Guide on Corporate Social Responsibility:http://www.ilo.org/public/english/support/lib/resource/subject/csr.htmInternational Organization of Employees, CSR: http://www.ioe-emp.org/en/policy-areas/csr/index.htmlThe Global Reporting Initiative: http://www.globalreporting.org/WhoAreYou/SME/UNIDO, Corporate Social Responsibility: http://www.unido.org/index.php?id=876United National Environment Program, Business & Corporate Social Responsibility:http://www.unep.fr/scp/business/World Bank Institute Program on Business, Competitiveness and Development:www.developmentandbusiness.orgWorld Business council for Sustainable Development: http://www.wbcsd.org/World Economic Forum: http://www.weforum.org/en/initiatives/globalhealth/World Resource Institute: http://www.wri.org/Local resource include your National Cleaner Production Center, business associations,Business Coalitions on AIDS, your National Environmental Protection Agency, and civilsociety organizations with expertise in addressing environmental and social issues. What is your business case for environmental and social response program development?Assess your management commitment.Using the Management Survey (see the Part 1 Resources Section), hold a discussionwith the General Manager, Human Resource Manager, Health and Safety Officer, andLabor Union Representative. This survey can help you assess your current managementcommitment to environmental and social issues, and follow changes in this commitmentover time. 16
  18. 18. □ Step 2. Demonstrate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response CommitmentEven before you start an environmental and social response program, formalrecognition of environmental and social issues as CORE issues for your company bytop managers and workplace leaders is important.This commitment can initiate the program, build understanding of the business case andthe management’s goal of protecting your company, its workers and its communityfrom harmful environmental, health, and safety conditions. It can also empowerworkers to take action on environmental and social issues, as well as stimulate an opendialogue around these issues in your company. One way to start to develop yourcompany’s leadership commitment is to release a written statement.To do this, you can use the Environmental and Social Commitment Statement (see thePart 1 Resources Section) as a guide. Top management can sign the statement.Witnesses, or co-signers, might be from key groups that participate in programdevelopment, such as members from the labor union, your company’s focal points andor environmental and social committee, and/or you company’s health and safetycommittee. 17
  19. 19. □ Step 3. Communicate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response CommitmentThe formal commitment to address environmental and social issues in your companyshould also be communicated by top management and workplace leaders to the rest ofthe company. Communication can be internal to workers at all levels in your company,as well as to external audiences, such as shareholders, buyers, insurance companies,banks, customers, and the broader community. This communication can take place viadifferent channels, such as in a general assembly, lunch meetings, posters in theworkplace, media, and advertising. Moreover, communication should continue on aregular basis throughout program development. Communication of commitment maybe combined with education and other company activities on environmental and socialissues, as well.The resource on “How to Communicate Your Environmental and Social Commitment”,found in the Part 1 Resources Section, can help your company’s leadership to plan howto communicate its environmental and social commitment is attached. 18
  20. 20. □ Step 4. Continuously Demonstrate your Company’s Environmental and Social CommitmentLong-term demonstration of commitment can be shown through active managementparticipation and support of environmental and social activities in your company.Examples of activities that a manager or leader can regularly support are the focalpersons and or environmental and social committee (s), environmental and socialstrategic planning, policy development, adjustment of operational activities andequipment, and training/education. Further, a company leader can present and shareyour company’s environmental and social response experiences in meetings and atpublic events. In good practice, top management, as well as other workplace leaders,show commitment in a number of different ways on a regular and consistent basis.Regular review of the Environmental and Social Commitment is also very important tohelp your company successfully manage and adapt to change (this will be covered inPart 3). 19
  21. 21. Part 1.Resources Section 20
  22. 22. Step 1. Build Environmental and Social Response Commitment in your Company 1.1 Company Management Survey on Environmental and Social IssuesThis survey is used to assess the extent of your management commitment toenvironmental and social issues.The General Manager or CEO should complete the survey together with the HumanResource Manager, Health and Safety Officer, Environmental Officer, and Labor UnionRepresentative. This survey can be useful to start an open discussion on yourcompany’s commitment to environmental and social issues. Use the survey over timeto assess changes in your company’s top management commitment.Company Name: _________________________________________ Littl Very Not e Sure1. To what extent are you concerned about the impact of environmental 1 2 3 4 0 and social issues on your company?2. To what extent is management willing to participate in 1 2 3 4 0 environmental and social activities in your company?3. To what extent are you willing to delegate workers to lead all 1 2 3 4 0 environmental and social response decision-making in your company?4. To what extent are you willing to assign budget for environmental 1 2 3 4 0 and social response activities?5. To what extent are you willing to implement specific environmental 1 2 3 4 0 and social policies and standards in your company?6. To what extent do you think environmental and social issues 1 2 3 4 0 have already impacted your company? 21
  23. 23. 7. What types of technical guidance do you need to develop your environmental and social response? __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________8. What measures do you intend to take to ensure continuity of your environmental and social response program at your business? __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________9. To what extent do you think environmental and social issues will impact your company in the next 5 years? __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________10. Which environmental and worker health and safety laws and regulations is your company required to follow? __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________11. Does lack of time or resources prevent your company from developing and implementing environmental and social responses? __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________12. Is your company aware of how environmental and social objectives relate to business objectives? __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________13. Any other comments? __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ 22
  24. 24. *Some of these questions were adapted from (1) Environmental Management Systems:A Design for the Environment Approach, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Office ofPollution Prevention and Toxics, March 1999, and (2) Environmental ManagementSystems: An Implementation Guide for Small and Medium-Sized Organizations. AnnArbor, MI: NSF International, November 1996. 23
  25. 25. Step 2. Demonstrate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response Commitment1.2 Model Environmental and Social Commitment StatementThis statement is to commit to addressing environmental and social issues andconsiderations as part of the core business of _________________ (company name).We know that not managing or mismanaging the environment, natural resources,human resources, health and social issues can have many negative impacts on ourcompany, our workforce, their families, and the communities in which our businessoperates. Some possible impacts in our company include production inefficiencies,compromised product quality, increased work expenditures, and worker absenteeism.We also know that to protect the people in our work environment and in ourcommunity, it is essential at this time to organize and implement an environmental andsocial response. With this recognition, we further express our commitment to thedevelopment of a comprehensive environmental and social response program in ourcompany led by a focal point and or committee that represents workers at all levels.Our program will: □ Give attention to environmental and social issues as CORE issues in regular company work. □ Have a range of different program items to address specific environmental and social priority issues in our workplace. □ Promote good practice when implementing environmental and social responses. □ Implement environmental and social response activities in a sustainable way whenever possible. □ Involve different groups, internally and externally.Name:__________________ Signature:__________________General Manager/CEODate: ___________C0-signers: 1. Labor Union 2. Health and Safety 3. Environment and Social Focal Point and or Committee 4. Female worker 5. Other 24
  26. 26. Step 3. Communicate your Company’s Environmental and Social Response Commitment1.3 How to Communicate Your Environmental and Social CommitmentThis resource can help your company to plan the communication of its environmentaland social response commitment. Effective communication of your company’scommitment to environmental and social response is important for many reasons,including: □ It can motivate workers at all levels. □ It can involve top managers in environmental and social mainstreaming, operational changes, and decision-making. □ It can help to document your achievements and share your experiences. □ It can enhance your public reputation and attract new partners. □ It can help to tailor the program to the needs of your company.You need to make sure that company leaders and top management communicate bothinternally and externally. Internal and external communication is done in differentways.Responsible Persons or Groups:Who is responsible for communicating your company’s environmental and socialcommitment (e.g. the CEO, the General Manager, the Environmental and Social focalpoint and or the Committee chairperson, the Labor Union Leader, etc.)?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Internal Communication:List how you intend to communicate your environmental and social commitment toyour workers at all levels (e.g. training, posters, management meetings, etc.):________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 25
  27. 27. External Communication:Who are your external audiences (government officials, customers, the localcommunity, buyers, etc.)?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Now think about how you would like to communicate your environmental and socialcommitment to external audiences (e.g. a public statement, advertising, presentations,a website, etc.). The modes of communication may be different for different audiences.List these ideas below:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 26
  28. 28. Part 2.Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in the Workplace and or Environmental and Social Workplace Committee for larger companies 27
  29. 29. Steps for ActionEnvironmental and Social Focal Points are typically people in your company. Forexample, Focal Points can be a specific person or groups responsible for environmental,health and gender activities. Focal Points serve as a “contact” point in your company forall environmental and social issues.Environmental and Social Focal Places and Target Areas are typically specific places usedfor environmental activities and community engagement, or are areas of your companythat are targeted for a specific environmental and/or social response.Having Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas can help link everyone working onenvironmental and social responses. Many of the ideas in the Environmental and SocialCommittee resources can also work for Focal Points. In all companies, Focal Points arekey and in a large company can be complemented by an Environmental and SocialCommittee.Below are Steps for Action to help you develop Environmental and Social Focal Points,Places, and Target Areas in your company: □ Step 1. Decide the Types of Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas to Develop and engage Management in the Environmental and Social Response Commitment. □ Step 2. Assign the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in your Company and select Environmental and Social Committee Members. □ Step 3. Describe the Activities and Purposes of the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas and describe the Environmental and Social Committee and Establish the Meeting Program for the Environmental and Social Committee. □ Step 4. Continuously Strengthen the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas and strengthen the Environmental and Social Committee through Action.For larger companies a central Environmental and Social Committee (task force, group,team, etc.) with employees from all levels is important to lead, organize and implementthe entire environmental and social response program in your company, whereasworking groups and focal persons may have specific roles such as recycling, awareness-raising of environmental and/or occupational safety issues, communication of theenvironmental and social policy, and so forth. The Environmental and Social Committeealso serves as the critical link between the management and employees onenvironmental and social-related issues.Keep in mind that this is a guideline and the order of the steps may vary slightly fromcompany to company. 28
  30. 30. A. □ Step 1. Decide the Types of Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas to Develop What types of Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas are important for your company? There are different types of Focal Persons and Places that your company can assign. Moreover, new Focal Points, Places, or Target Areas may be needed as the Environmental and Social Response Program grows. □ Focal Points are people or a group or a committee in the workplace whose job can include specific environmental and social responses, such as an environmental engineer, an auditor, a community relations manager, a line worker, a human resources officer, working groups, and/or a health and safety officer. □ Focal Places are common places that can be used for raising awareness, training, and communicating environmental and social responses in your company. These might include an office for Environmental and Social Focal Persons and or Committee meetings, a bulletin board for awareness raising materials, a cafeteria for showing related videos and holding informational and training sessions, or a community garden. □ Target Areas are the parts of your company that will be targeted for a specific environmental and/or social response. These might include the chemicals or fertilizers storage room, the wastewater treatment area, the kitchen, the waste room, the open space next to your company, or the community center. B. Engage Management in the Environmental and Social Focal Points and Response Commitment.Meet with Management to discuss forming the Environmental and Social Focal Point andor Committee. In good practice, top managers (the General Manager, ProductionManager, etc.) should provide written support for the development of an Environmentaland Social Focal Point and or workplace Committee, and a senior employee should begiven the responsibility of making a keeping the Focal Point and or Committee active. Asample Environmental and Social Committee Delegation Letter is included (Part 2Resources Section). Top management support of such a Focal Point and or Committee iscomplementary and additional to the Leadership Commitment (refer to Part 1 of thisManual).The regular involvement of a manager in the Environmental and Social Focal Point and orCommittee is important to lead decision-making and strategic change. It ensures that the 29
  31. 31. Focal Point and or Committee will become an effective guiding force for organizing andimplementing environmental and social actions in your company.Problem Solving: In some cases, an Environmental, Occupational Health and Safety, or Community Relations working group or club may already exist in your company without Management involvement. For example, your company may have a working group of only workers, auditors, or a few motivated people interested in environmental and/or social issues and causes. While these people are essential to bring environmental and social issues awareness and education into your company, the support of a formal Committee with direct access to Leadership and Top Management, may also be important. 30
  32. 32. □ Step 2. Assign the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in your CompanyThis step is to officially recognize selected persons, places, and target areas as importantfor environmental activities, health and safety information, and community engagement(please refer to the Part 2 Resources Section).For larger companies, select Environmental and Social Committee Members □ A Manager and workplace leader should be assigned as the Chair and Vice-Chair of the Committee. □ Other positions can be based on volunteerism and or election, taking into consideration the membership structure of the Committee and the capabilities of the person. All members should have a personal interest in working on environmental and social issues in the workplace. □ All positions should be formally recognized in writing by top management. □ The number of members in the central Committee will depend on your company; typically, it consists of about eight (8) people. The Committee should include at least one (1) person from each work area.Please refer to the resource “Environmental and Social Committee MembershipAssignment Form” in the Part 2 Resources Section. 31
  33. 33. □ Step 3. Describe the Activities and Purposes of the Focal Points, Places, and Target AreasThe environmental and social activities to take place in Focal Places and Target Areasshould be explained, and the work, activities, qualifications, and management of theFocal Persons should be described. This will help clarify the environmental and socialactivities that happen in Focal Places and Target Areas, as well as the responsibilities ofthe Focal Persons.A model terms of reference for Environmental and Social Focal Points is available in thePart 2 Resources Section. In good practice, the environmental and social activities ofFocal Points can also be added to existing company documents, such as job descriptions,employee evaluation procedures, and departmental functions.Describe the Environmental and Social Committee.For a larger company, after the decision to form an Environmental and SocialCommittee is made, a terms of reference is required for the Environmental and SocialCommittee (refer to the Part 2 Resources Section). This is simply a written documentthat describes the Committee, including its management, membership, activities, andstructure. □ The management section should define reporting lines and decision-making power of the Committee. □ The Committee members should include managers and employees, people from different departments, and people with specialized skills, such as planning, procurement, and occupational health and safety. □ The jobs of the Committee in your company should include environmental and social response activities, plans, meetings, and progress reports.In good practice, the terms of reference should be drafted in consultation with topmanagers, employees, and other stakeholders, such as auditors, people living in thecommunity that is affected negatively by the company’s operations, and safetyinspectors. Consensus among stakeholders on the description of the Committee will putthe Committee in the best position to implement environmental and social responseprogram items. 32
  34. 34. □ Step 4. Continuously Strengthen the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas and the CommitteeJust like with other Environmental and Social Response Program items, the assignmentof Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas alone does not make an Environmental andSocial Response Program. Some ideas to strengthen Environmental and Social FocalPoints, Places, and Target Areas in your company:Establish the Meeting Program for the Environmental and Social CommitteeEstablish a regular meeting program during work hours, and at a convenient time andplace. The major reason for the Committee meetings is to continuously organize andimplement environmental and social response activities in the workplace. Regularmeetings are also essential for ongoing exchange among members, follow up, andteamwork. Some ideas to help you to get started with your Environmental and SocialCommittee’s meetings and activities are included in the Part 3 Resources Section.Strengthen the Environmental and Social Focal Point and or Committee throughAction and following a regular schedule □ Start discussion forums on environmental topics in the cafeteria each week. □ Have weekly or bi-monthly workshops on worker safety. □ Provide HIV/AIDS counseling services. □ Start a Family Day each quarter where you hold environmental education and community activities in your local community. □ Start a recycling program.Other strengthening actions can be innovative ideas to sustain and improve theCommittee. □ Register the Committee as an NGO or an association. Taking this step has helped some Committees to raise funds for acquiring new technologies, receiving specialized training, or paying for baseline assessments and follow up monitoring activities.Provide the Focal Point and or Committee with office space. Companies have used thisas a way to motivate the Focal Point and or Committee and allocate common space forenvironmental and social issue awareness-raising and training activities. 33
  35. 35. Part 2.Resources Section 34
  36. 36. Step 1. Decide the Types of Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places and TargetAreas to develop and engage Management in the Environmental and Social ResponseCommitment2.1. Environmental and Social Committee Delegation Letter Date___________To: Chair of the Environmental and Social CommitteeSubject: Management Support for the Company Environmental and Social CommitteeAn Environmental and Social Committee with employee members from all levels is abasic requirement of a workplace program to implement effective, sustainable, and costefficient environmental and social responses. It is required to lead, organize, andimplement all parts of the Environmental and Social Response Program in the company,including community relations, outreach, and partnerships. It also serves as the criticallink between management and employees on environmental and social issues.To organize and implement its Environmental and Social Response Program, ourcompany requires an Environmental and Social Committee. This letter is to fullyauthorize you to form the Environmental and Social Committee in the company withrepresentative worker membership according to the terms of reference, as well as toassign you to lead the Committee as Chairperson. In your absence, the Vice-Chairperson will lead the Committee.You will work according to the Committee’s program and report to the General Managereach month on activities, challenges, and progress.Thank you,Name_______________________General ManagerSignature_____________________General ManagerCCAll departments 35
  37. 37. Step 2. Assign the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in your Company and SelectEnvironmental and Social Committee Members2.2 Assignment of Environmental and Social Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas inyour CompanyThis resource assists you in formally assigning Environmental and Social Focal Points,Places, and Target Areas in your company. Add the appropriate number of Focal Points,Places, and Target Areas for your company, and remember more can be added overtime as the Program develops.Complete the names, job title, and location of your assigned Focal Points, Places, andTarget Areas, and give the reason for choosing that place, person, and target area.Company Name: _________________ Date: _________Focal Persons: Name Job Title Reason1234You can make your own assignment form and add more Focal Persons, as you require. 36
  38. 38. Focal Places: Location Reason1234Add more locations, as you require.Target Areas: Location Reason1234I recognize the above people and places as Focal Points, Places, and/or Target Area forenvironmental and social response activities in my company.Name: __________________________________ Date:_________General Manager 37
  39. 39. Step 2. Assign the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas in your Company and SelectEnvironmental and Social Committee Members2.3 Environmental and Social Committee Member Assignment FormThis document can be used to formally assign Environmental and Social Committeemembers in your company.The main Environmental and Social Committee can include eight (8) to ten (10) people.In good practice, the members may include: managers, employees from alldepartments, interest groups, and people with specialized skills such as auditing andplanning. Examples are the Human Resources Manager, the Health and Safety Officer,the labor union representative, the company Head Engineer, a leader from thecommunity, the Budget Officer, and young workers.List your Environmental and Social Committee members here:Company Name:____________________________________Committee Name:___________________________________Members: Position in Name Job Title in Signature Committee Company 38
  40. 40. I hereby support the above individuals as members of our company’s Environmental andSocial Committee.Name_______________________ Signature_______________General Manager 39
  41. 41. Step 3. Describe the Activities and Purposes of the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areasand describe the Environmental and Social Committee and Establish the MeetingProgram for the Environmental and Social Committee2.4. Terms of Reference for Environmental and Social Focal PersonsThis resource is an example of a terms of reference, or a job description, of anEnvironmental and Social Focal Person in a Human Resources position. Thequalifications, management, and activities of the Focal Person will vary depending onthe type of Focal Person and your company’s situation. You can make a shortdescription like this for every Focal Person in your company. Qualifications: □ Background in accounting, auditing, environmental engineering, environmental and social standards, community outreach, or a related field. □ Interest to continue his/her professional development in business-related environmental and social impacts and responses, specifically in environmental management systems, environmental assessments, business- community relations, and health and safety workplace issues. □ Willing to engage in continuous self-learning on environmental, health and safety, and community issues affecting the workplace and the broader community. □ Good communication and leadership skills. Management: □ This position will be assigned in writing by management. □ Reports to and advises the Environmental and Social Committee on environmental and social issues related the company every month. □ Commits to providing updated communication and/or training material, as appropriate. Major Activities: □ Conduct an environmental and social impact assessment of the company and report back to the Environmental and Social Committee. □ Develop and conduct an environmental and/or worker health and safety training day. □ Develop an initiation program on the company’s environmental and social program, policy, and commitment for new employees. 40
  42. 42. Step 3. Describe the Activities and Purposes of the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areasand describe the Environmental and Social Committee and Establish the MeetingProgram for the Environmental and Social Committee2.5. Terms of Reference for the Environmental and Social CommitteeThis document is to help you describe the Environmental and Social Committee in yourworkplace, including its 1) membership, 2) management, and 3) major activities. Use itas a guideline to write the terms of reference for your company’s Environmental andSocial Committee.Company Name____________________________ Date__________1. Committee MembershipThe Committee has ____ number of members. The positions are (Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson, Secretary, Treasurer,etc.):____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Members represent persons from: □ Management □ Young workers □ All departments □ The community □ The labor union □ The Health and Safety Committee □ The Auditor Office □ The Budget Office □ Environmental engineers □ Other(s)___________________________________________________________ _____________________________________ 41
  43. 43. 2. Committee ManagementMembers are elected by ___________________________. Each member is assigned bymanagement, and his/her job description will be adjusted to consider theenvironmental and social responsibilities. The Committee Chairperson reports to theGeneral Management on a monthly basis, and is delegated to lead democratic decision-making on all environmental and social response issues in the company.Other____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________3. Committee Major ActivitiesThe Committee will meet _____ time(s) per month. It will organize and implement ALLenvironmental and social response activities in the company workplace and thecommunity. _______________ time is allocated per week to organize, implement, andmonitor environmental and social activities and decisions.Members will: prepare Action Plans, reports, and proposals for all environmental andsocial response activities; organize, implement and monitor different types of innovativeenvironmental and social activities, programs, or linkages that fit the company; followgood practice and make use of existing resources in the workplace and community;attend trainings and engage in self-learning on environmental and social issues; serve asrole models for environmental and social issues in the company; network to shareexperiences on environment, health, and community relations and business, and; serveas advisers to the company’s management, labor union, and community onenvironmental and social issues.Other____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________General Manager Name____________ Signature____________Labor Union Name____________ Signature____________Committee Name____________ Signature____________ 42
  44. 44. Step 4. Continuously Strengthen the Focal Points, Places, and Target Areas andStrengthen the Environmental and Social Committee through Action2.6. Getting the Environmental and Social Committee StartedBelow are discussion ideas, actions, and objectives to help you to start theEnvironmental and Social Committee in your company. Following the suggestions canhelp the Environmental and Social Committee to become an active force in thecompany. Results can evolve over time and with regular meetings and action.Getting Started: Discussion Idea Action Points AchievementDevelop a meeting Decide on a meeting The Environmental andschedule schedule to start the Social Committee has a Committee’s work. Include regular meeting schedule. the meeting time, place, duration, frequency, speakers, and an agenda (topics).Identify work activities The Committee can allocate The Environmental and monthly work assignments Social Committee has an to implement the active work plan. environmental and social responses in the company. Include timelines and specific tasks for each member.Develop a guideline for the The Committee guideline The Environmental andEnvironmental and Social can put together all the Social Committee has aCommittee information on the guideline that is followed operations of the for each of its activities. Committee, including its structure, meeting program, Subcommittees, member job descriptions, strategy, money handling, etc. 43
  45. 45. Develop your Partnerships Identify partners and other A list of partners andand Community Relations organization that can resources to start your support the work of your work. committeeMeetings of the Environmental and Social Committee:The Committee can use meetings to discuss how to take action on specificenvironmental and social responses in the company, such as environmental education,training for a new operational procedure, how to implement the company’sEnvironmental and Social Action Plan, inviting a guest expert on soil types, etc. Keep inmind that a Committee should try to problem-solve, rather than ONLY identifychallenging environmental and social issues.The Committee consists of ACTIVE PROBLEM-SOLVERS! 44
  46. 46. Part 3. Environmental and Social Response Planning and Strategizing:Environmental and Social Issues Capabilities Assessment and Situation Analysis 45
  47. 47. Steps for ActionIt is important to understand the environmental and social issues that are relevant toyour company. Then, you can plan, organize and implement actions to effectivelyaddress these issues and your situation.Key Steps for Action to analyze your company’s environmental and social situation are:Environmental issues: □ Step 1. Conduct an Environmental Self-Assessment.Social issues: □ Step 2. Conduct a Social Self-Assessment. 46
  48. 48. □ Step 1. Conduct an Environmental Self-AssessmentA. Identify Environmental Issues Affecting your CompanyB. Identify Environmental Response Gaps in your CompanyC. Capabilities AssessmentD. Review the Available Resources for your Environmental ResponseA. Identify Environmental Issues Affecting your Company In the beginning of your environmental response planning, you can use rapid methods to identify potential environmental risks and vulnerabilities facing your company. As the program grows, information on environmental vulnerabilities, risks and costs should also come from environmental response monitoring and evaluation activities and workplace studies. Identify the priority environmental issues to address in your company’s environmental response planning using the resource in the Part 3i Resources Section. It also helps you identify who your company wants to target with its environmental response. □ Group Discussion can provide a rapid analysis of the environmental situation in your company. Your company’s environmental response Action Plan can then include actions to help change identified issues. A tool in the Part 3i Resources Section can guide group exchange. It asks you to identify 3 priority issues to address in the next 6 months, as well as 3 priority issues to address in the next 1-2 years. □ Company Self-Assessment is another way to rapidly identify potential vulnerability and environmental risk factors facing your company (please refer to the Part 3i Resources Section).B. Identify Environmental Response Gaps in your Company Many companies have already implemented environmental responses. For example, some companies may already be recycling or using more energy efficient technology, and an Environmental and/or Occupational Health and Safety Committee may already be set up. Existing experiences, whether big or small, active or inactive, can inform planning by further helping you to identify program items to improve on, challenges to tackle, and gaps in your company’s environmental response planning. □ List some response gaps/needs to address in your company’s environmental response planning (refer to the resource in the Part 3i Resources Section). □ Group Discussion further helps you to think about environmental actions needed in your company. 47
  49. 49. Environmental o Does your company have an organized management structure for addressing environmental issues? o Does your company have an internal and external environmental awareness- raising and communication plan? o Are environmental issues and responses addressed in the daily operations in your company? o Has your company identified key partners to assist with resource and cost- sharing of environmental responses? What about technical assistance? o Has your company documented your environmental achievements and performance? o What is missing from your actions?C: Environmental Capabilities AssessmentThe objective of an Environmental Capabilities Assessment is to compile data that willprovide an overview of certain characteristics of your company. This allows yourcompany to identify risk factors regarding environmental issues, and to identify areas ofopportunity where environmental responses can be integrated and developed.The most effective programs will leverage existing capabilities, so answers should reflectthe current situation within your company, as this will form the basis for action for yourcompany’s environmental responses.You can conduct an environmental capabilities assessment for your company using theresource in the Part 3i Resources Section.Adapted from: International Finance Corporation, IFC Against AIDS, “HIV/AIDS and theWorkplace: Company Self-Assessment Form and Company Capabilities”.D. Review the Available Resources for your Environmental ResponseEnvironmental response planning should consider new and creative ways of usingexisting resources in your company and community. Improving how you use/accessresources can help your company to run, facilitate and support environmental responseprogram items, and make environmental response program development moresustainable and cost-effective. □ List resources for your company’s environmental response planning (refer to the Part 3i Resources Section). 48
  50. 50. □ Group Discussion: Use the questions below to further discuss how to best use/access resource to assist environmental response program development in your company. This activity will also build team work for planning. □ What resources will be needed for your company’s Environmental Response Program? Typically, this might be in terms of fund allocation, but companies also have many non-cash resources that can be used for environmental response program development. □ What resources can your company contribute to its Environmental Response Program? Think of resources already existing in your company for information capturing and awareness-raising, office space, material resources, expertise, budget lines, and existing standards and codes. How can these resources be used for your environmental response activities? □ What resources will you seek from partners? Think of your business partners, your business association, your labor union, and any partners from government, civil society and the community. Partnering can help a company to access additional or new expertise, knowledge and resources on new technologies or techniques, and important contacts for your Environmental Response Program development. 49
  51. 51. □ Step 2: Conduct a Social Self-AssessmentA. Identify Social and Community Issues Affecting your CompanyB. Identify Social Response Gaps in your CompanyC. Capabilities AssessmentD. Review the Available Resources for your Social ResponseA. Identify Social and Community Issues Affecting your Company In the beginning of your social response planning, you can use rapid methods to identify potential social risks and vulnerabilities facing your company. As the program grows, information on social vulnerabilities, risks and costs should also come from social response monitoring and evaluation activities and workplace studies. Identify the priority social and community issues to address in your company’s social response planning in the Part 3ii Resources Section. This also helps you identify who your company wants to target with its social response. □ Group Discussion can provide a rapid analysis of the social situation in your company. Your company’s social response Action Plan can then include actions to help change identified issues. A tool in the Part 3ii Resources Section can guide group exchange. It asks you to identify 3 priority issues to address in the next 6 months, as well as 3 priority issues to address in the next 1-2 years. □ A Company Self-Assessment is another way to rapidly identify potential vulnerability and risk factors facing your company (please refer to the Part 3ii Resources Section).B. Identify Social Response Gaps in your Company Many companies have already implemented social responses. For example, some companies may have set up an HIV/AIDS Committee, offer advanced training, or hold a community day. Existing experiences, whether big or small, active or inactive, can inform planning by further helping you to identify program items to improve on, challenges to tackle, and gaps in your company’s social response planning. □ List some response gaps/needs to address in your company’s social response planning (refer to the Part 3ii Resources Section). □ Group Discussion further helps you to think about social actions needed in your company. o Does your company have an organized management structure for addressing social issues? 50
  52. 52. o Does you company have an internal and external awareness-raising and communication plan for key social and community issues? o Are social issues and responses mainstreamed into daily operations in your company? o Has your company identified key partners to assist with resource and cost- sharing of social responses? What about for community outreach activities? o Has your company documented your community and social related achievements and performance? o What is missing from your actions?C: Social Capabilities AssessmentThe objective of a Social Capabilities Assessment is to compile data that will provide anoverview of certain characteristics of your company. This allows your company toidentify risk factors regarding social issues, and to identify areas of opportunity wheresocial responses can be integrated and developed.The most effective programs will leverage existing capabilities, so answers should reflectthe current situation within your company, as this will form the basis for action for yourcompany’s social responses.Conduct your company’s social capabilities assessment using the resource in the Part 3iiResources Section. D. Review the Available Resources for your Social ResponseSocial response planning should consider new and creative ways of using existingresources in your company and community. Improving how you use/access resourcescan help your company to run, facilitate and support social response program items,and make social response program development more sustainable and cost-effective. □ List resources for your company’s social response planning (refer to the Part 3ii Resources Section). □ Group Discussion: Use the questions below to further discuss how to best use/access resource to assist social response program development in your company. This activity will also build team work for planning. □ What resources will be needed for your company’s Social Response Program? Typically, this might be in terms of fund allocation, but companies also have many non-cash resources that can be used for social response program development. 51
  53. 53. □ What resources can your company contribute to its Social Response Program? Think of resources already existing in your company for information capturing and awareness-raising, office space, material resources, expertise, budget lines, and existing standards and codes. How can these resources be used for your social response activities?□ What resources will you seek from partners? Think of your business partners, your business association, your labor union, and any partners from government, civil society and the community. Partnering can help a company to access additional or new expertise, knowledge and resources on new technologies or techniques, and important contacts for your Social Response Program development. 52
  54. 54. Community ActivitiesCommunity activities stem from your company’s involvement in society at local,national, regional, and even international levels. You can work with communityactivities in many different ways.Your company may have many different reasons for wanting to get involved with itscommunity. For example, your company might want to engage in community activitiesto: • Make your company an attractive workplace for employees and make current employees proud of their workplace. • Create new business opportunities. • Contribute to compiling new experience and learning in your company through working with organizations and areas in which your company has not operated before. • Ensure the availability in your community of resources you need – qualified labor or development opportunities for partnership businesses.You can use the tools in part 3ii when you are considering engaging in communityactivities. 53
  55. 55. Part 3 i.Environmental Resources Section 54
  56. 56. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(A)3.1 i Identifying Priority Environmental Issues in your CompanyThis resource can help you to list priority environmental issues to address in yourcompany’s environmental response planning.Using the checklist below, formulate your individual priority list of environmental issuesfacing your company. Then, please check the items for which there is group consensusthat this is a key priority issue that needs to be addressed in your company.Individually, and then as a group, check the top four (4) issues that you identify aspriority environmental issues that your company should address. At the end, check allthe target groups that you want to reach.What environmental My Commonissues does your Choice Agreementcompany want toaddress? √ √ Sustainable Natural Resource Management Environmental Rehabilitation Biodiversity Conservation Pollution Abatement Global Warming Desertification Energy Issues Transportation Wastewater Solid Waste Management OtherWho does yourcompany want totarget with itsenvironmental 55
  57. 57. responses? Leaders and top management in the company All employees and staff Suppliers Buyers Consumers Local community Other Your choice:_________________________ _______________________________ _________________________ 56
  58. 58. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(A)3.2 i Group ExchangeThere are many environmental issues and activities for a company to consider. Whatare the most critical ones for your company? Please identify three (3) immediate orshort-term priorities (next 6 months) and three (3) long-term priorities (next 1-2 years).Short Term Priority 1 (Next 6 Months)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Short Term Priority 2 (Next 6 Months)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Short Term Priority 3 (Next 6 Months)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Long Term Priority 1 (Next 1-2 Years)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Long Term Priority 2 (Next 1-2 Years)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Long Term Priority 3 (Next 1-2 Years)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 57
  59. 59. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(B)3.3 i Company Environmental Self-AssessmentCompany OperationsThis resource can help you to compile data on environmental risk factors in and/orfacing your company. It can assist you in identifying issues that can be addressed withinyour environmental response program. It serves as an assessment and analysis of yourcompany’s current situation. You will be able to use this as a baseline to measure theimpacts that your environmental response program has on these same issues onceimplementation begins.* The following resources are adapted from Integrated Environmental ManagementSystems: Company Manual Template for Small Businesses, United States EnvironmentalProtection Agency; Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, December 2000.Identification of Environmental, Health and Safety IssuesWhyIn order to understand and manage actual and potential environmental impacts, yourcompany needs to identify the basic manufacturing and supporting operations that arerelevant for your environmental response program. You should also, if relevant, identifythe health and environmental concerns related to particular chemicals used in yourcompany’s operations, if relevant.Who and how □ The company focal point and or committee chair (described in detail in Part 2 of this Manual): o Identify the basic manufacturing and supporting operations that are relevant for the environmental response program. o Develop an input/output diagram. o Assess the companies’ environmental impact and their actual or potential impacts (quantified to the extent possible) and list them by operation. o If an operation involves the use of a potentially harmful chemical (s) or substance (s), the focal point and or committee chair is responsible for researching the known health and environmental concerns, and then listing these.On the next pages you will find the resources to do all the suggested steps above. 58
  60. 60. How oftenThis procedure is repeated annually to ensure that any new environmental, health, andsafety issues are identified.ReportingRecords of all these information are maintained by the focal point and or committeechair. 59
  61. 61. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(B)3.4 i Basic and Supporting OperationsUse the space below to identify the basic (manufacturing) and supporting operations inyour company that are relevant to your environmental response program. List thembelow:Such as suppliers, distribution channel, etc.1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.Contact Person: _____________________________Date Completed: _____________________________* From Integrated Environmental Management Systems: Company Manual Template forSmall Businesses, United States Environmental Protection Agency; Office of PollutionPrevention and Toxics, December 2000 60
  62. 62. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(B)3.5 i Input/Output DiagramsRecord your input/output flows of materials into diagrams to make the process easier.Use the sample diagrams below to help you– one for an office operation, and the otherfor a manufacturing operational activity in your company. These are meant as examplesand may be different in your company. Example: Input-Output Diagram for Office Operations Paper Printed Documents Energy Copying Waste Paper Toner Used Toner Odors Example: Input-Output Diagram for a Manufacturing OperationChemicals Chemical WasteMaterials Manufacturing Materials WasterEnergy Step Waste WaterWater Air Releases Product for Next Step 61
  63. 63. Can you draw an input/output diagram for a part of your company’s operations?Think of an important part. Product or Service Component Parts* From Integrated Environmental Management Systems: Company Manual Template forSmall Businesses, United States Environmental Protection Agency; Office of PollutionPrevention and Toxics, December 2000 62
  64. 64. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(C)3.6 i Company Environmental Self-AssessmentThink more about the environmental impacts of your operations.The environmental aspects of your operations can be listed in the following table: Environmental Concern Operation Input/Output (quantify if readily possible) Environmental Impact* From Integrated Environmental Management Systems: Company Manual Template for Small Businesses, United StatesEnvironmental Protection Agency; Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, December 2000 63
  65. 65. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(C)3.7 i Health, Safety, and Potential Environmental ConcernsIf an operation involves use of a potentially harmful chemical (s) or substance (s), the focal point and or committee chair isresponsible for researching the known health and environmental concerns. You can use this table to start your research: Regulatory Data Human Health Effects Effects on Wildlife or by Pathways Acute Other Environmental RankWork and Chronic EffectsActivity/Chemical Environmental Concern Information Source Carcinog en? Permissi ble E Volatile Organic C Toxic Releases ? Inhalatio n Dermal Ingestio n Air Water Land Safety Concerns Human Environ mentContact Person: ____________________ Date: _________________* From Integrated Environmental Management Systems: Company Manual Template for Small Businesses, United StatesEnvironmental Protection Agency; Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, December 2000 64
  66. 66. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(C)3.8 i Exposure to Chemicals and MaterialsIf an operation involves use of chemicals and materials, the focal point and or committee chair is responsible for researching theknown environmental concerns and their exposure. You can use this table to start your analysis: Exposure How are they exposed? Who is exposed?Operation Environmental Quantity Time Personal Concern Used Protective per Equipment Time How How Human Environmental Workers Community Environment Period long? often? (inhalation, (air, water, dermal, land) oral)Contact Person:________________________ Date: ___________________* From Integrated Environmental Management Systems: Company Manual Template for Small Businesses, United StatesEnvironmental Protection Agency; Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, December 2000 65
  67. 67. Step 1. Conduct and Environmental Self-Assessment(D)3.9 i Company Environmental Self-Assessment Company CapabilitiesLeadershipBy reviewing commitment to environmental management through leadership, your companycan ensure commitment at all levels and an “environmentally responsible” company culture. 1. Are senior managers involved in environmental issues and management? Are they involved in setting environmental objectives and monitoring targets? 2. Does senior management promote a positive company culture towards environmental issues? 3. Do senior managers communicate your company’s environmental performance to all levels?Organization and TrainingBy reviewing your company’s policies, training programs, resources and documentationprocesses, your company can ensure that your environmental goals are being met in the mostefficient way.1. Is there a document for employees describing your company’s policies? How/when is thisinformation communicated to employees?2. What are the training programs, if any, that already exist? What topics do they cover? Howlong does each training program take? Where does it take place? Are these group or individualtraining sessions? Are they for existing employees or new employees, or both?3. What are your company’s environmental programs, if any? Do all employees know aboutyour company’s environmental programs? What is the human resources capacity for theseprograms? Is there one person or a group of people, for example, who is responsible for yourcompany’s environmental programs and activities?Operations, Products, and ServicesBy reviewing your company’s operations and activities, you can ensure that environmental risksrelating to operations, products, and services are identified and evaluated, and that risk-reducing measures are developed. 1. Does your company have management processes for the identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of environmental hazards and effects associated with your activities? What are they? 66

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