Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Chapter 5 - Magazines

2,286 views

Published on

  • my company was wanting AK Form 08-4229 a few weeks ago and encountered a web service that hosts a searchable forms database . If others are interested in AK Form 08-4229 also , here's http://pdf.ac/3bbs3o
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Chapter 5 - Magazines

  1. 1. 1 Magazines Chapter 5 © 2009, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. 2 CHAPTER OUTLINE • History • Magazines in the Digital Age • Defining Features of Magazines • Organization of the Magazine Industry • Magazine Ownership • Producing the Magazine • Economics • Feedback
  3. 3. 3 HISTORY • Magazines have had a long history in the US
  4. 4. 4 The Colonial period • “Magazine”: warehouse or depository – Variety of opinion pieces, facts, human interest stories • Strong political bias • Written to educated urban audience • Encouraged literate and artistic expression • Unified the colonies
  5. 5. 5 After the Revolution • Continue to target educate elite audience • Present mix of topical and political articles • Roots of modern news magazine
  6. 6. 6 The Penny-Press Era • 1820s-1860s -- Magazines appealed to mass audience • Parallel strategies of penny press newspapers • Target the middle class
  7. 7. 7 The Magazine Boom • 1860-1900 – many new magazines appeared – More available money – Improved printing techniques – Postal Act of 1879 • Special mailing rates for magazines – Magazines could reach national mass audience • Muckrakers – investigative reporting
  8. 8. 8 Between the Wars • Changing lifestyles influenced magazine development • Three magazine types emerged – Digest – News weeklies – Pictorial magazine
  9. 9. 9 The Postwar Period • Publishers continued to specialize to satisfy readers who had – Increased leisure time – Liberalized views – New interests in urban lifestyles
  10. 10. 10 Contemporary Magazines • Challenges to magazine industry – Declines in single-copy sales – Sweepstakes competitions have nearly disappeared – National do-not-call list – Cable TV and Internet
  11. 11. 11 MAGAZINES IN THE DIGITAL AGE • Magazines are still learning how to use the Internet • Generating revenue from the Internet – Ad-supported web-only titles – Repackaged print content – Charging for access to archives – E-commerce
  12. 12. 12 Replica Editions • Replica editions are not online editions • Replica editions mimic the print magazine
  13. 13. 13 Mobile Magazines • Magazines can be read on laptops, cell phones, PDAs • Magazine podcasts are available • Challenges with mobile magazine delivery – How long will readers stay with mobile editions? – What about payment
  14. 14. 14 User-Generated Content • Publishers are cautiously exploring user- generated content – Want to retain control of content – Not sure how to generate revenue – Could be way to build audience base
  15. 15. 15 DEFINING FEATURES OF MAGAZINES • Specialized audiences • In tune with social, economic, cultural trends • Can influence social trends • Convenient portable format
  16. 16. 16 ORGANIZATION OF THE MAGAZINE INDUSTRY • The magazine industry can be classified by the types of content presented in the magazine, or by the three traditional components of manufacturing.
  17. 17. 17 Content Categories • General consumer magazines • Business publications • Custom magazines • Literary reviews and academic journals • Newsletters • Public relations magazines
  18. 18. 18 Functional Categories • Production • Distribution – Paid circulation – Controlled circulation • Retail
  19. 19. 19 MAGAZINE OWNERSHIP • The magazine industry is dominated by large corporations, many with holdings in other media. • The five leading magazine publishers are Time Warner, Advance Publications, Hearst Corporation, Meredith Corporation, and Reader’s Digest Association
  20. 20. 20 PRODUCING THE MAGAZINE A variety of people work together to create a magazine
  21. 21. 21 Departments and Staff • Publisher • Circulation Department • Advertising Department • Production Department • Editorial Department
  22. 22. 22 Publishing the Magazine • Plan for upcoming issues • Convert ideas into articles, pictures, illustrations • Create dummy – conceptual plan or blueprint of final publication • Assign work schedules and deadlines • Begin the work
  23. 23. 23 ECONOMICS • Revenue sources – Subscriptions – Single-copy sales – Advertising – Ancillary services • The magazine industry is facing tough times
  24. 24. 24 FEEDBACK • Audit Bureau of Circulation (ABC) – Paid circulation – Rate base • Business Publication Audit (BPA) • Mediamark Research, Inc (MRI) – Primary audience – Pass-along audience • Online readership – Audit Bureau of Circulation – Nielsen/NetRatings
  25. 25. 25 Magazine Audiences • 85% of US adults read at least one magazine per month • Adults look through an average of 10 magazines per month • Readers more educated and more affluent than non-readers • Readers tend to be joiners

×