American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting:
                Philadelphia, PA  USA
                      Dec 2009
...
The Social Life of Trees: Community 
 Resilience, Collective Action, and 
 Environmental Behavior
 (Reviewed by Anthropolo...
Rival, Laura.  1998.  The Social Life of Trees: Anthropological Perspectives on Tree Symbolism.
           Berg Publishers...
Trees as Social Objects  in 
              Anthropology
“From its beginnings , anthropology has 
  concerned itself as muc...
Trees and Rebirth: 
                                                                              Resilience, Ritual and S...
Abstract
The relationship between trees and rituals and symbols is well described in 
   anthropology, from classics like ...
Tree Symbolism in Anthropology
“…Trees are used symbolically to 
  make concrete and material the 
  abstract notion of li...
“GLOBAL HYPOTHESIS”

In urban post‐disaster and post‐conflict contexts, community –based 
natural resources management, su...
Resilience is…
• Explanations for the source and role of 
    change in adaptive systems, particularly 
    the kinds of c...
Methods
Trees Shaped Resilience before and 
             after  Katrina
Before                             After
• Ecosystem servi...
Actionable Restoration Target
Parkway Partners "ReLeaf New Orleans" Post‐Katrina Trees Planted, 
              by Site Typ...
Symbol of Re‐birth
On Tennessee Street, only trees
                                                                                     remai...
Trees Shaped Resilience before and 
             after  Katrina
Before                             After
• Ecosystem servi...
Source of Memory & Memorialization
                                           The 2002 "Restore the Oaks" art installation...
Community of Practice
   A community of practice defines itself along 
   three dimensions.
   What it is about – its join...
Trees Shaped Resilience before and 
             after  Katrina
Before                             After
• Ecosystem servi...
Virtuous v Vicious Cycles
Memorial tree examples are familiar…




 Scythe Tree, Waterloo, NY   Survivor tree Nagasaki
 From a postcard             ...
Memorial tree examples are familiar…
        The Oklahoma City bombing “Survivor Tree”




Image from http://www.panoramio...
Memorial tree examples are familiar…
               The New York City 9/11 “Survivor Tree”

              2001            ...
Memorial tree examples are familiar…
Saint Paul’s Chapel, NYC
Tree memorials are “Living Memorials…
Because of the 
  overwhelming 
  desire to honor 
  and memorialize 
  the tragic l...
Living Memorials connect people
            "This tree, a gift from the People of 
            Oklahoma City, is the offsp...
In conclusion
Thank you CFERP and NOLA Partners




    Thanks also to my Cornell colleagues:  Marianne Krasny, 
        Mark Bain, Max ...
Tree Troopers 2009
Population by race/ethnicity (2000‐2007)




 Source: Greater New Orleans Community Data Center (www.gnocdc.org) analysis ...
For More…
www.resilientgreen.org
Trees and Rebirth: Resilience, Ritual and Symbol in Community‐based Urban Reforestation Recovery Efforts in Post‐Katrina N...
Trees and Rebirth: Resilience, Ritual and Symbol in Community‐based Urban Reforestation Recovery Efforts in Post‐Katrina N...
Trees and Rebirth: Resilience, Ritual and Symbol in Community‐based Urban Reforestation Recovery Efforts in Post‐Katrina N...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Trees and Rebirth: Resilience, Ritual and Symbol in Community‐based Urban Reforestation Recovery Efforts in Post‐Katrina New Orleans

7,731 views

Published on

The relationship between trees and rituals and symbols is well described in anthropology, from classics like Turner’s milk tree in The Forest of Symbolsto more recent explorations by Rival, Brosse, and others inThe Social Life of Trees.Trees often appear in life cycle rituals or are used as kinship models, and are frequently seen deployed as images of continuity and reproduction as contrasted to images of change and destruction. Current research in fields of horticultural therapy, natural resources management, city and regional planning, and social‐ecological system resilience also acknowledge both biophysical and cultural aspects to trees in urban contexts. Historically trees have held special symbolic significance to residents of New Orleans, contributing to identity and sense of place. This paper includes observations of how in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, trees as symbols have been observed to take on additional and more explicit meanings related to determination to recover from the disaster and demonstrate community resilience. Further, the paper describes the author’s observation of a kind of ritualizationof the act of planting trees, which may result in deepening individual and community commitment to demonstrating and enhancing New Orleans’s resilience.

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
7,731
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,111
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Trees and Rebirth: Resilience, Ritual and Symbol in Community‐based Urban Reforestation Recovery Efforts in Post‐Katrina New Orleans

  1. 1. American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting: Philadelphia, PA  USA Dec 2009 THE SOCIAL LIFE OF TREES:  COMMUNITY RESILIENCE, COLLECTIVE  ACTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL  BEHAVIOR Photo by David Kozlowski
  2. 2. The Social Life of Trees: Community  Resilience, Collective Action, and  Environmental Behavior (Reviewed by Anthropology and Environment Section) Chair: Keith G. Tidball 8:00‐ 8:05 Introductions 8:05‐ 8:30 Rodolfo Tello 8:30‐ 8:45 discussion 8:45‐ 9:10 Keith G. Tidball 9:10‐ 9:25 discussion 9:25‐ 9:45 General discussion, concluding remarks
  3. 3. Rival, Laura.  1998.  The Social Life of Trees: Anthropological Perspectives on Tree Symbolism. Berg Publishers: Oxford.
  4. 4. Trees as Social Objects  in  Anthropology “From its beginnings , anthropology has  concerned itself as much with the ways in  which natural processes are conceptualized  and the natural world classified, as with the  ways in which human societies interact with  their natural environments and use natural  resources.” Laura Rival‐ The Social Life of Trees
  5. 5. Trees and Rebirth:  Resilience, Ritual and Symbol in Community‐ based Urban Reforestation Recovery Efforts in   Post‐Katrina New Orleans Keith G. Tidball Cornell University Department of Natural Resources American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting: Philadelphia, PA  USA Dec 2009 Session: THE SOCIAL LIFE OF TREES: COMMUNITY RESILIENCE, COLLECTIVE ACTION  AND ENVIRONMENTAL BEHAVIOR “Scrap House”  art installation by Sally Heller.  Convention Center, NOLA. Photo: Arts Council of New Orleans 
  6. 6. Abstract The relationship between trees and rituals and symbols is well described in  anthropology, from classics like Turner’s milk tree in The Forest of Symbols to more recent explorations by Rival, Brosse, and others in The Social Life  of Trees. Trees often appear in life cycle rituals or are used as kinship  models, and are frequently seen deployed as images of continuity and  reproduction as contrasted to images of change and destruction.  Current  research in fields of horticultural therapy, natural resources management,  city and regional planning, and social‐ecological system resilience also  acknowledge both biophysical and cultural aspects to trees in urban  contexts.  Historically trees have held special symbolic significance to  residents of New Orleans, contributing to identity and sense of place.  This  paper includes observations of how in  the wake of Hurricane Katrina,  trees as symbols have been observed to take on additional and more  explicit meanings related to determination to recover from the disaster  and demonstrate community resilience.  Further, the paper describes the  author’s observation of a kind of ritualization of the act of planting trees,  which may result in deepening individual and community commitment to  demonstrating and enhancing New Orleans’s resilience.
  7. 7. Tree Symbolism in Anthropology “…Trees are used symbolically to  make concrete and material the  abstract notion of life [and are]  … ideal supports for such  symbolic purpose precisely  because their status as living  organisms is ambiguous.”  Laura Rival‐ The Social Life of Trees
  8. 8. “GLOBAL HYPOTHESIS” In urban post‐disaster and post‐conflict contexts, community –based  natural resources management, such as “greening” or “urban  community forestry,”  a.) confers resilience across multiple scales before  a catastrophic event, and b.) demonstrates resilience and reactivates  recovery feedbacks and virtuous cycles after a catastrophic event. CASE SPECIFIC HYPOTHESES  1. Trees shaped resilience before and following disaster in New Orleans. 2. The active engagement of citizens with trees played/plays a crucial,  yet often unrecognized, role across multiple scales in recovery and  resilience in Post‐Katrina New Orleans.
  9. 9. Resilience is… • Explanations for the source and role of  change in adaptive systems, particularly  the kinds of change that are transforming. • Focused on social‐ecological systems ‐ linked systems of people and nature.  • Found at multiple scales, from the scale  of a farm or village, through communities,  regions, and nations to the globe. Resilience ‐ the ability to absorb disturbances, to be changed and then to re‐organize  and still have the same identity. It includes the ability to learn from the disturbance.  Walker, B., C. S. Holling, S. R. Carpenter, and A. Kinzig. 2004. Resilience, adaptability and transformability in social–ecological systems. Ecology and Society 9(2): 5. [online] URL:  http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol9/iss2/art5
  10. 10. Methods
  11. 11. Trees Shaped Resilience before and  after  Katrina Before After • Ecosystem service provision • Actionable restoration target – cooling • Symbol of regeneration,  – storm water mgmt rebirth, resilience – air quality • Source of memory and  – aesthetic & recreational  memorialization values • Sense of place • Basis for emergence of a  Community of Practice – Well‐being – Social capital • Catalyst for re‐initiation of  – Links to SES resilience virtuous cycles in social‐ ecological system
  12. 12. Actionable Restoration Target Parkway Partners "ReLeaf New Orleans" Post‐Katrina Trees Planted,  by Site Type ( +6k through Mar 2009) Street to Sidewalk 22% Schoolyards and Parks 37% Neutral Ground Trees 7% Home Landscapes (purchased) 10% Native Saplings (give‐aways) 24% “I have taken trees and so many other things for granted before the storm;  I guess you don’t appreciate what you have until it is gone. Planting trees  now will give future generations an environment they can appreciate and  makes me feel like a part of something way bigger than myself (Parkway  Partners “Tree Trooper” volunteer, May 19, 2009).”
  13. 13. Symbol of Re‐birth
  14. 14. On Tennessee Street, only trees remained after the storm. Residents now look to the trees as a symbol of their neighborhood’s endurance, and their street bustles with new construction. In fact, Tennessee offers a veritable textbook example of construction methodology. American Apartment Owners Association Newsletter http://www.american‐apartment‐owners‐ association.org/blog/2009/02/02/three‐years‐after‐ katrina‐brad‐pitt‐still‐rallies‐in‐new‐orleans/ http://www.chicagotribune.com/travel/chi‐new‐orleans‐0525_r_lmvmay25,0,4086594,full.story
  15. 15. Trees Shaped Resilience before and  after  Katrina Before After • Ecosystem service provision Actionable restoration target – cooling Symbol of regeneration,  – storm water mgmt rebirth, resilience – air quality • Source of memory and  – aesthetic & recreational  memorialization values • Sense of place • Basis for emergence of a  Community of Practice – Well‐being – Social capital • Catalyst for re‐initiation of  – Links to SES resilience virtuous cycles in social‐ ecological system
  16. 16. Source of Memory & Memorialization The 2002 "Restore the Oaks" art installation featured  30 local artists, each creating an original mural on the  outer freeway columns to memorialize the live oak  trees that once stood on either side of Claiborne  Avenue. I am going to go further back (than Katrina)…We lost  something…we had these big majestic oaks that city planning  and everyone else saw fit to uproot. Along with those oaks we  had inherited businesses. So that’s the legacy that’s lost. So,  these trees (we are planting) might be a reminder of what we  lost, so that we don’t ever forget it and don’t let that happen to  us again, as well as kind of light a fire under us to ensure that we  won’t have to worry about a legacy being lost (due to Katrina)  (Treme community member and tree planter, January 19 2009). 
  17. 17. Community of Practice A community of practice defines itself along  three dimensions. What it is about – its joint enterprise as  understood and continually renegotiated by its  members. How it functions ‐ mutual engagement that  bind members together into a social entity. What capability it has produced – the shared  repertoire of communal resources  that  members have developed over time. Communities of practice can be seen as self‐ organizing systems and have many of the  benefits and characteristics of associational life  such as the generation of what Robert Putnam  and others have discussed as social capital.  Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning and identity. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Wenger, E. (1998). "Communities of Practice: Learning as a Social System." Systems Thinker , June. Smith, M. K. (2003, 2009) 'Communities of practice', The Encyclopedia of Informal Education,  www.infed.org/biblio/communities_of_practice.htm.    Putnam, Robert D. (2000). Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York: Simon & Schuster.
  18. 18. Trees Shaped Resilience before and  after  Katrina Before After • Ecosystem service provision Actionable restoration target – cooling Symbol of regeneration,  – storm water mgmt rebirth, resilience – air quality Source of memory and  – aesthetic & recreational  memorialization values • Sense of place Basis for emergence of a  Community of Practice – Well‐being – Social capital • Catalyst for re‐initiation of  – Links to SES resilience virtuous cycles in social‐ ecological system
  19. 19. Virtuous v Vicious Cycles
  20. 20. Memorial tree examples are familiar… Scythe Tree, Waterloo, NY Survivor tree Nagasaki From a postcard Photo by: Meghan Deutscher
  21. 21. Memorial tree examples are familiar… The Oklahoma City bombing “Survivor Tree” Image from http://www.panoramio.com/photo/14637493
  22. 22. Memorial tree examples are familiar… The New York City 9/11 “Survivor Tree” 2001 Spring 2009 Michael Browne/Parks Department David W. Dunlap/The New York Times
  23. 23. Memorial tree examples are familiar… Saint Paul’s Chapel, NYC
  24. 24. Tree memorials are “Living Memorials… Because of the  overwhelming  desire to honor  and memorialize  the tragic losses  that occurred on  September 11,  2001 (9‐11) the  United States  Congress asked  the USDA Forest  Service to create  the Living  Memorials  Project (LMP). See USDA Forest Service Living Memorials Project www.livingmemorialsproject.net This initiative invokes the resonating power of trees to bring people  together and create lasting, living memorials to the victims of terrorism,  their families, communities, and the nation.
  25. 25. Living Memorials connect people "This tree, a gift from the People of  Oklahoma City, is the offspring of the  Survivor Tree which remained standing  in the wake of the bombing of the  Alfred P. Murrah Building on April 19,  1995. It is planted here among the  trees that survived the September 11,  2001 attacks upon the World Trade  Center  to symbolize our common  bond, resiliency and renewal. May it  forever represent hope and strength to  endure. World Trade Center Survivors‘  Network, September 10, 2006“
  26. 26. In conclusion
  27. 27. Thank you CFERP and NOLA Partners Thanks also to my Cornell colleagues:  Marianne Krasny,  Mark Bain, Max Pfeffer, and Richard Stedman
  28. 28. Tree Troopers 2009
  29. 29. Population by race/ethnicity (2000‐2007) Source: Greater New Orleans Community Data Center (www.gnocdc.org) analysis of US Census Bureau data from Census 2000 and American Community Survey 2007
  30. 30. For More… www.resilientgreen.org

×