Water Cycle interactive presentation

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  • Water Cycle interactive presentation

    1. 1. Hello boys and girls! Welcome to . . .A Water Cycle Adventure Click HERE to begin! Kimberly Grant EDT 530 Professor Gail Garthwait March 2011
    2. 2. We are going to have so much fun learning about the water cycle! You will learn cool new For Teachers: words like evaporation and precipitation! Student GoalsFor StudentsThe Water Cycle Click on the topic Resources you want to start with. Clouds Photo CreditsThe Water Cycle and ME Water Cycle ReviewTake this challenge to see how much you learned! Back to the beginning
    3. 3. Clouds • What are clouds?A cloud is a large collection of very tinydroplets of water or ice crystals. Thedroplets are so small and light that they canfloat in the air. Click on a type of cloud to learn more! Stratus Clouds Fog Table of
    4. 4. Cumulus Clouds• Cumulus Clouds are white, puffy clouds that look like pieces of floating cotton. Cumulus clouds are often called "fair- weather clouds". The base of each cloud is flat and the top of each cloud has rounded towers. When the top of the cumulus clouds resemble the head of a cauliflower, it is called cumulus congestus or towering cumulus. These clouds grow upward and they can develop into giant cumulonimbus clouds, which are thunderstorm clouds. Back to
    5. 5. Stratus Clouds• Stratus clouds are uniform grayish clouds that often cover the entire sky. They resemble fog that doesnt reach the ground. Light mist or drizzle sometimes falls out of these clouds. Back to
    6. 6. Cirrus Clouds• Cirrus clouds are the most common of the high clouds. They are composed of ice and are thin, wispy clouds blown in high winds into long streamers. Cirrus clouds are usually white and predict fair to pleasant weather. By watching the movement of cirrus clouds you can tell from which direction weather is approaching. When you see cirrus clouds, it usually indicates that a change in the weather will occur within 24 hours. Back to
    7. 7. Fog• Fog: There are many different types of fog, but fog is mostly formed when southerly winds bring warm, moist air into a region, possibly ending a cold outbreak.• As the warm, moist air flows over much colder soil or snow, dense fog often forms. Warm, moist air is cooled from below as it flows over a colder surface. If the air is near saturation, moisture will condense out of the cooled air and form fog. With light winds, the fog near the ground can become thick and reduce visibilities to zero. What kind of cloud is lazy because it will never wake up? FOG! Back to
    8. 8. The Water Cycle • The earth has a limited amount of water.  That water keeps going around and around and around and around and in what we call the "Water Cycle". • Water Cycle SongThis cycle is made up of a few main parts:• evaporation (and transpiration)• condensation Click to learn more about each part of the• precipitation water cycle.• collection• What does the water cycle look like? Table of
    9. 9. The Water Cycle Song Wow, that was a cool Water Cycle Song by Mr. Davies!! Back to Water
    10. 10. What Does the Water Cycle Look Like? Back to Water
    11. 11. Condensation • Water vapor in the air gets cold and changes back into liquid, forming clouds. This is called condensation.You can see the same sort of thing at home... pour a glass of cold wateron a hot day and watch what happens.  Water forms on the outside ofthe glass.  That water didnt somehow leak through the glass!  Itactually came from the air.  Water vapor in the warm air, turns back intoliquid when it touches the cold glass. Back to Water
    12. 12. Precipitation What happens when it rains cats and dogs? YOU HAVE TO BE CAREFUL NOT TO STEP IN A POODLE!• Precipitation occurs when so much water has condensed that the air cannot hold it anymore.  The clouds get heavy and water falls back to the earth in the form of rain, hail, sleet or snow. Back to Water
    13. 13. Evaporation • Evaporation is when the sun heats up water in rivers or lakes or the ocean and turns it into vapor or steam. The water vapor or steam leaves the river, lake or ocean and goes into the air.Did you know that plants sweat?People perspire (sweat) and plants transpire.  Transpiration is theprocess by which plants lose water out of their leaves.  Transpirationgives evaporation a bit of a hand in getting the water vapor back up intothe air. Back to Water
    14. 14. Evaporation • Evaporation is when the sun heats up water in rivers or lakes or the ocean and turns it into vapor or steam. The water vapor or steam leaves the river, lake or ocean and goes into the air.Did you know that plants sweat?People perspire (sweat) and plants transpire.  Transpiration is theprocess by which plants lose water out of their leaves.  Transpirationgives evaporation a bit of a hand in getting the water vapor back up intothe air. Back to Water
    15. 15. Collection• When water falls back to earth as precipitation, it may fall back in the oceans, lakes or rivers or it may end up on land.  When it ends up on land, it will either soak into the earth and become part of the “ground water” that plants and animals use to drink or it may run over the soil and collect in the oceans, lakes or rivers where the cycle starts Back to Water
    16. 16. Water Cycle ReviewWhat is a cloud made of?A. snowB. cottonC. water droplets & ice crystals Home
    17. 17. Water Cycle ReviewWhat happens whenwater evaporates?A. Heat turns the water into steam and it goes into the air.B. the water disappearsC. the water dries up Home
    18. 18. Water Cycle Review What is precipitation?A. Sleet and SnowB. Rain and HailC. All of the above Home
    19. 19. Sorry,WRONGanswer! Try Again
    20. 20. Right!Super Job! Next Question
    21. 21. Sorry,WRONGanswer! Try Again
    22. 22. Right!Super Job! Next Question
    23. 23. Right!Super Job! Home
    24. 24. Sorry,WRONGanswer! Try Again
    25. 25. How Does the Water Cycle effect our lives? Click the pictures to learn moreWater to drink Gardens Weather Back to Water
    26. 26. Water We Drink • The sun sucks up the evaporated water from lakes, rivers and oceans. That water is perfectly clean. The clouds move over the land and drop the water as rain. The rain runs into rivers eventually ending up in the ocean. The cycle starts again. Water has always been an important and life-sustaining drink to humans and is essential to the survival of all organisms.Back to Water Cycle and ME
    27. 27. Gardens• Animals and people get energy from the food they eat. We can grow food in gardens and we need water to grow food. Back to Water Cycle and ME
    28. 28. Weather All the earths weather is dependent on part of the water cycle concerning evaporation and condensation (resulting in precipitation). In places where there is plenty of water in the atmosphere, there are clouds, and precipitation. In other places, where the amount of water in the atmosphere is sparse, skies are mostly cloud-free, and little or no precipitation falls.Back to Water Cycle and ME
    29. 29. Student Goals Students will: • Be able to name and explain the stages of the water cycle; including 4 types of clouds • understand that the water cycle is continuous • understand that we need the water cycle in order to survive Maine Parameters for Essential Insruction Science & TechnologyA3 Constancy and ChangeStudents observe that in the physical setting, the living environment, and the technological world somethings change over time and some things stay the same.D2 EarthStudents describe Earth’s weather and surface materials and the different ways they change.E2 EcosystemsStudents understand how plantsand animals depend on each other and the environment in which they live. Table of Contents
    30. 30. ResourcesGames: • http://www.teacherplanet.com/links/redirect.php?url=http://www.quia.com/jg/62.html • http://kids.earth.nasa.gov/droplet.html • http://apps.southeastwater.com.au/games/education_kidsroom_wcactivity.aspBooks:http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3170Resources:http://geology.com/teacher/water.shtml Table of Contents
    31. 31. Teachers• Grade level: 2nd-4th• This project was designed for a class; Introduction to Hypermedia. I created this presentation as an interactive addition to a unit on the water cycle appropriate for young students.• Teacher background: Water on earth is used over and over. The water cycle, the continuous movement of water from ocean to air and land then back to the ocean in a cyclic pattern, is a central concept in meteorology. In the water cycle, the sun heats the Earths surface water, causing that surface water to evaporate (gas). This water vapor then rises into the earths atmosphere where it cools and condenses into liquid droplets. These droplets combine and grow until they become too heavy and fall to the earth as precipitation (liquid if rain, solid if snow). Water is temporarily stored in lakes, glaciers, underground, or living organisms. The water can move from these places by streams and rivers, returns to the oceans, is used by plants or animals or is evaporated directly back into the atmosphere. Table of Contents
    32. 32. Photo Credits• “stratus clouds.” Destination of Marvel. 31 Jan. 2011 [http://destinationofmarvel.blogspot.com/2011/01/ clouds.html]• “cirrus clouds”, “cumulus clouds.” Blessed Family of Flowers. 24 Feb. 2010 [http:// blessedfamilyofflowers.wordpress.com/2010/02/]• “driving in fog.” Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. 2008 [http://www.flhsmv.gov/safetytips/ Fog.htm]• “condensation.” Bjorn Tore Kieding. The First Kieding Watercooling Project. [http://bt.kieding.org/projects/ watercooling/?page=2]• “fair weather cumulus clouds.” Joshua. The Fun Times Guide. [http://weather.thefuntimesguide.com/2009/12/ cumulus_clouds.php] Table of More Credits Contents
    33. 33. Photo Credits• “water cycle.” Western Water. 2010 [http://www.westernwater.com.au/commedu/Pages/Schoolresources.aspx]• “evaporation.” Fremont Magnet Elementary. Feb. 2011 [http://schools.bcsd.com/fremont/ 5th_Sci_weather_maps_severe_weather.htm]• “precipitation.” Fondriest Environmental. 2011 [http://www.fondriest.com/science_library-htm/precipitation.htm]• “cloud chart.” Christen Leigh Maxwell. How Are Clouds and Precipitation Connected. 2006 [http:// www.valdosta.edu/~clmaxwell/topic.html]• “stratus cloud.” Clouds and How They Got Their Names. 7 Dec. 2010. [http://blog.justcheaphotel.com]• “fog.” National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office. 18 Apr. 2007 [http://www.crh.noaa.gov/jkl/?n=fog_types]• “cirrus cloud.” Thunda Funda. [http://thundafunda.com/wallpaper-blog/nature-pictures/clouds/pictures-of- clouds/]• “drinking water.” Hoover Ng. Water Replenishment District of Southern California. [http://www.wrd.org/ water_quality/drinking-water-standards-california.php]• “garden.” Urban Farmer. 2011 [http://www.ufseeds.com/Planting-a-Garden-Urban-Farmers1.html] More Credits• “weather.” Lumpenprofessoriat. Attendance Forecast. 3 Feb. 2011 [http://lumpenprofessoriat.blogspot.com] Table of• 4 seasons. Vxside. 4 Seasons. [http://vxside.deviantart.com/art/4-seasons-81436429] Contents
    34. 34. Photo Credits• “cows.” The Carmarthenshire Rivers Trust. 2010 [http://carmsriverstrust.com/Problems.aspx]• “gardening.” Patricia Meyer. Happy Living Magazine. 2010 [http://www.happynews.com/ living/gardening/beginner-gardening.htm]• “cloudy sky.” Redman 20732. Southern Maryland Online. 1 Apr. 2009 [http:// photos.somd.com/showphoto.php/photo/7237]• “cloudless sky.” Nature Photography. 9 Mar. 2011 [http://nitrophoto.wordpress.com/]• “water cycle.” The Water Cycle. 1998 [http://www.mbgnet.net/fresh/cycle/cycle.htm] Table of Contents
    35. 35. Sources• http://www.weatherwizkids.com/ weather-clouds.htm• http://www.life123.com/home- garden/kids-gardening/plant-science/ six-things-kids-should-know-about-the- water-cycle.shtml Table of Contents

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