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Tuberculosis in Prisons World Health Organization http://www.who.int/tb
Prisons <ul><li>World’s prisons hold 8-10 million prisoners, but high turnover means 4-6 times this many annually </li></u...
Prisons <ul><li>Prison conditions can fan the spread of disease through overcrowding, poor ventilation, weak nutrition, in...
<ul><li>The level of TB in prisons can be up to 100 times higher than that of the civilian population and up to 25% of a c...
MDR-TB in prisons <ul><li>Up to 24% of TB cases are MDR </li></ul><ul><li>Prisoners self-treat because of lack of access t...
Why is it important? <ul><li>Prisons act as a reservoir for TB, pumping the disease into the civilian community through st...
Why is it important? <ul><li>Drawing attention and resources to the problem of TB is likely to lead to an improvement in p...
Solutions <ul><li>Access to the diagnosis and treatment of TB. </li></ul><ul><li>Delays in the detection and treatment of ...
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TB in prisons

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TB in prisons

  1. 1. Tuberculosis in Prisons World Health Organization http://www.who.int/tb
  2. 2. Prisons <ul><li>World’s prisons hold 8-10 million prisoners, but high turnover means 4-6 times this many annually </li></ul><ul><li>Socio-economically disadvantaged populations where burden of disease is high and access to medical care limited </li></ul>
  3. 3. Prisons <ul><li>Prison conditions can fan the spread of disease through overcrowding, poor ventilation, weak nutrition, inadequate or inaccessible medical care </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>The level of TB in prisons can be up to 100 times higher than that of the civilian population and up to 25% of a country’s TB burden </li></ul><ul><li>HIV infection and other pathology more common in prisons (e.g. malnutrition, substance abuse) encourage the development of active disease and further transmission of infection </li></ul>TB in Prisons
  5. 5. MDR-TB in prisons <ul><li>Up to 24% of TB cases are MDR </li></ul><ul><li>Prisoners self-treat because of lack of access to supplies of anti-TB drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Treatment is erratic and unregulated contributing to MDR </li></ul>
  6. 6. Why is it important? <ul><li>Prisons act as a reservoir for TB, pumping the disease into the civilian community through staff, visitors and inadequately treated former inmates </li></ul><ul><li>TB does not respect prison walls </li></ul>
  7. 7. Why is it important? <ul><li>Drawing attention and resources to the problem of TB is likely to lead to an improvement in prison conditions, the health of inmates and human rights. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Solutions <ul><li>Access to the diagnosis and treatment of TB. </li></ul><ul><li>Delays in the detection and treatment of TB cases must be minimized </li></ul><ul><li>Unregulated, erratic treatment of TB in prisons should cease. </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate prison and civilian TB services to ensure treatment completion for prisoners released </li></ul>

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